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Following last night's announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson decided not to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, many may have questions about how grand juries operate.

Grand juries are generally called on to decide whether there is probable cause to bring criminal charges against an individual, typically in cases which may result in serious, felony charges. Although all states have laws allowing for grand juries, not all states make use of grand juries.

Besides Missouri, what other states use criminal grand juries?

Two Ohio men sentenced to death for a 1975 murder have been exonerated after 39 years in prison.

Ricky Jackson and Wiley Bridgeman were set free after the prosecution's key witness recanted his testimony during a hearing last week, reports The Plain Dealer. Following the hearing, the prosecution dropped its objections to a new trial for the men, and later dropped the charges against Jackson and Bridgeman, clearing them of any wrongdoing in the case.

According to the National Registry of Exonerations, Jackson and Bridgeman's nearly four decades behind bars are the longest sentences ever served by any person who was later exonerated. How did these men manage to clear their names so many years after the fact?

Americans have the right to a jury trial when accused of serious offenses under the Sixth Amendment, but can you choose to waive those rights?

A jury of your peers can be between six and a dozen persons with no guarantee of legal background, while a trial by judge places your fate in the hands of one legally accomplished individual.

So when do you get the choice not to have a jury trial, and why would you choose to forgo one?

Following a drunken or drugged driving arrest, working with a DUI attorney can be the best way to potentially avoid criminal penalties as well as negative impacts on your driving privileges.

When hiring a DUI lawyer, you'll want to ask some basic questions -- for example, whether the attorney has experience with DUI cases. But aside from the basics, there are many other questions you may also want answered.

What should you ask? Here are five important questions for your DUI lawyer:

Retrial over the punishment of convicted murderer Jodi Arias resumed Wednesday, after legal issues with the defense's case caused testimony to be delayed for almost two weeks.

Part of this period was spent addressing legal arguments that media outlets should be excluded from court during testimony in Arias' retrial to accommodate a "skittish defense witness" to testify in private, reports The Associated Press. The judge in Arias' case also denied a defense motion to delay the trial based on allegations that police altered or deleted evidence on the victim's computer.

As the retrial resumes this week, what should those interested in Arias' retrial look for?

With fingerprint-reading technology now being implemented in more and more smartphones, rulings like the one last week really get under people's skin.

Last Tuesday, a Virginia judge ruled that police officers can force a suspect to unlock a smartphone using that phone's fingerprint scanner, reports The Wall Street Journal. This ruling has many privacy advocates worried that fingerprint and biometric tech on cell phones will become a loophole for police abuse.

Before you chuck your new phone in the trash, check out our five level-headed takeaways from this ruling:

An Illinois inmate has been released after over a decade in prison for a double-homicide conviction that was key to ending the state's death penalty.

Alstory Simon was the second person to be convicted for a 1982 double murder, but there were serious questions about whether Simon's confession was coerced, the Sun-Times Media Wire reports. Now, more than three decades after the deaths, Illinois prosecutors have asked that charges against Simon be dropped.

What happened in Simon's case, and why is he now being released?

When a police officer asks to search your cell phone, it may be difficult to know if you can legally refuse.

The situations may vary, but in general, arrestees do not have to let the police search their cell phones, even if cops demand it. As one retired California judge told San Francisco's KPIX-TV, officers can only look at a suspect's cell phone with consent, in an emergency, or with a search warrant.

Before you let a cop search your cell phone, consider this:

No one (or at least anyone in their right mind) goes around looking for a fight.

But sometimes, whether you're looking for it a not, a physical confrontation may find you. If you find yourself the victim of an assault, what can you do to defend yourself without also potentially being charged with a crime?

Is it legal to fight back if someone punches you first?

Drunken driving suspects don't always argue "I wasn't drunk" or "I wasn't driving." Sometimes, they get a little more creative with their DUI defense theory.

Of course, the more creative the theory, the less likely it is to work. But hey, everybody needs a Hail Mary once in a while. And if a DUI is likely to impact your career (as it may for police officers and truck drivers, for example) one of these long-shot defenses might be worth trying.

Of course, defense strategy is something that you should discuss with your attorney, and if you're desperate enough to try one of these, you need an attorney, so consider this helpful information -- not legal advice. Here they are, from plausible to utterly nuts: