Dumb Criminals - FindLaw Blotter
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Sure, you can physically hand your ID or driver's license to your friend. And your friend may hold it in her hands momentarily, while pointing and laughing at the goofy look you're sporting in the picture. That friend can even pass it to another friend, while pointing and laughing and saying, "Look!" All of that is perfectly legal.

It's normally what happens after you give a friend your ID that matters.

All rape is bad. Raping a person is bad and witnessing a rape and doing nothing makes you a bad person. But witnessing a rape and deciding, "Yeah, I need to livestream this" makes you a bad and dumb person.

Raymond Boyd Gates is the bad person who allegedly raped a 17-year-old. Marina Alexeevna Lonina is the bad and dumb person who allegedly livestreamed the rape on Periscope. Fortunately, both bad people are currently in jail and have been indicted for crimes that could keep them there for 40 years.

A Texas judge sentenced Ethan Couch to a tentative 720-day jail sentence related to the "Affluenza" teen's probation conditions stemming from his 2013 drunken driving accident that killed four people and injured two more. Couch celebrated his last teenage birthday in the maximum security Lon Evans Correctional Center in downtown Fort Worth, Texas, and could spend his remaining teenage days there.

But District Judge Wayne Salvant did give Couch's attorneys two weeks to come up with an argument to reduce the jail sentence. Can they do it?

'Tis the season for furiously clicking that "Track Package" button in sales confirmation emails. Whether you're worried about outgoing gifts making it to their destination on time or excited about an incoming present, tracking a package online can become a daily or even hourly obsession.

And it can get you arrested, if you happen to be tracking a package full of drugs from China.

Criminal Consequences for Christmas Vandals

A rash of Christmas vandals, determined to take the fun out of kitsch, are attacking inflatable Santa Clauses and other outdoor holiday displays around the country. But yes Virginia, it is a crime.

Police do prosecute vandals of all kinds, and those who attack outdoor holiday displays are in no way exempt from being charged with a crime. In fact, some citizens are so offended by the abuses that they have set up their own surveillance to help cops catch these culprits.

Let's look at two recent cases.

Criminal Consequences of Stealing Packages

It is a federal criminal offense to tamper with the mail. So no matter how delightful and intriguing the neighbor's deliveries seem, avoid the temptation to pilfer a package from their porch because you're short on Christmas gifts.

Theft of a letter, post card, package, bag, or mail from a US post office or a collection center associated with USPS is subject to fines and up to five years imprisonment, according to the United States Code, Section 1708. Receiving mail that was stolen is similarly punishable.

Phone Thief Uploads Selfies to Victim's Cloud Storage

A California high school student whose phone was stolen provided police with a perfect description of the thief. Selfies appeared on the victim's cloud storage days after the robbery, showing the suspect smiling, pouting, and posing happily, NBC News Bay Area reports.

The victim noticed the images uploaded a few days after the incident and gave them to the police. Now they are all over the web, and the cops are asking for the public's help in identifying the thief.

Supervised release works for some ex-cons. Time spent in halfway houses can help some recently released offenders acclimate to life outside and more easily transition into life after prison. Others, not so much.

Phillip Allen Nelson didn't quite take to supervised release, and while there the convicted bank robber knocked over two more banks less than a month after he had been paroled.

An Arlington, Texas man carving a Halloween pumpkin with his daughter stabbed an intruder on Tuesday, unwittingly ending a two-hour, carjacking crime spree. After catching the man rifling through his wife's purse, Scott Hackney stabbed him in his back with a pumpkin carving knife.

Hackney held the man down while a neighbor summoned police, and the home intruder received treatment at a local hospital before heading to jail.

Hey everyone! Watch me break the law!

If two boys commit a crime but no one is watching, did it really happen? Perhaps not, which is why two teenage boys had the bright idea to film and livestream their illegal ice cream stealing escapade.

Unsurprisingly, the video landed them in juvenile court.