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Has someone hacked your computer? Did someone steal your password? You probably have Alex Yucel and his Blackshades malware to blame.

The co-creator of malware technology has been sentenced to prison for hacking after pleading guilty earlier this year.

Last week, a woman was groped on a Brooklyn, NY subway. That might have been the end of the story, but instead, she took a photo of the man with her cell phone and gave it to police, who in turn gave it to the press. Now the article is being shared on Facebook and Twitter, and the perpetrator is more likely to be found than if the victim had only given officers a vague physical description.

The NYPD has been famous for using social media to fight crime. (Or infamous, depending on your perspective.) But the department is merely reflecting what citizens are doing more and more for themselves -- utilizing technology and social media to prevent crime and catch criminals.

First Target, then Home Depot, now, everybody's favorite government agency, the IRS has been attacked by data thieves.

The IRS has admitted this week that 100,000 taxpayer files have been accessed by hackers in the last couple months. While 100,000 people is a small amount compared to the millions affected by Target's data breach, this theft is more worrisome because of how the thieves got the information.

Three years ago, Amanda Todd killed herself.

She was relentlessly harassed and bullied online. A man she met on Facebook charmed her into flashing her topless body to him. He took a picture and put it on the Internet where it went viral. Since then, Todd endured endless bullying and teasing. On October 10, 2012, she couldn't put up with the bullying and harassment any more and committed suicide.

Three years later, many people like Amanda are still victims of online harassment and bullying every day. Even celebrities are fair game. So what can you do to fight back against online harassment?

Last November, hackers who had gained access to Sony Entertainment Pictures data began releasing emails, un-released films, and personal information gained from a possibly year-long attack. Last week, WikiLeaks posted the entire collection of stolen data, around 200,000 documents and emails.

The hack itself was illegal under nearly all state and federal computer crime laws. But does that mean posting and reading the leaked documents is criminal as well?

Man Answers Boy's Craigslist Ad for Sex; Gets 12 Years in Prison

A Florida man was sentenced to more than 12 years in prison after answering a teenage boy's Craigslist ad seeking "adult companionship" and engaging in sexual activity with the teen.

50-year-old Brian Keith Dunn of Coral Springs pleaded guilty to coercing or enticing a minor into engaging in sexual activity, reports the Sun Sentinel. Dunn admitted to communicating with the 14-year-old by text and email, but maintained he never actually met the boy face-to-face.

Police told a different story, however.

A man accused of running Silk Road 2.0, a revived Internet black market, was arrested by the FBI on Wednesday in San Francisco.

Blake Benthall, 26, also known as "Defcon," is accused of attempting to resurrect the infamous Silk Road, a somewhat-secret website which allowed visitors to purchase anything from illicit drugs to murder-for-hire contracts. According to Ars Technica, the FBI reports that Benthall is facing charges of narcotics trafficking, computer hacking, money laundering, and fraudulent document trafficking, all of which carry weighty prison sentences.

What was Benthall doing with Silk Road 2.0, and what is he facing in federal prosecution?

Are Online Rants Criminal Threats? Supreme Court to Weigh In

When does an online rant cross the line from free speech to being a criminal threat?

That's the issue the nation's highest court will soon be taking up. As reported by SCOTUSblog, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal of a lower court's ruling in Elonis v. United States, in which a disgruntled ex-husband's angry Facebook posts got him arrested on federal charges.

What will the Supreme Court be looking at in this case?

A fake Twitter account can potentially lead to real criminal consequences, beginning with your arrest.

Just ask Jacob L. Elliott, 36, who was arrested after police served a search warrant on a home where they believed someone was operating a Twitter account posing as the mayor of Peoria, Illinois, the Peoria Journal Star reports.

Technically, Elliott was booked on drug charges and not in connection with the @peoriamayor account. Still, how can a fake Twitter account get you arrested?

5 Ways You Can Get Charged With Stalking

Though the exact definition of stalking varies by state, it's generally described as the repeated unwanted pursuit of someone. It typically involves a pattern of conduct in which the offender follows, harasses, or threatens the victim, causing the victim to fear for his or her safety.

But what does that mean in reality, how do you know if you're a stalker?

Specific acts that count as stalking include, but are not limited to, the following five situations: