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As virtual reality technology advances, like with every new technology, the law frequently needs time to play catch-up. We have already seen the law extend to cover credible criminal threats made online. However, when it comes to virtual reality (VR), lawmakers may be teetering upon an uncertain slippery slope. 

Recently, a virtual reality user reported having her VR character (avatar) repeatedly molested by another VR user inside the same VR world. Despite the lack of actual physical contact, the violated user explained that she felt many of the same emotions as she did when she was groped in real life, and to make matters worse, there was nothing she could do to stop the virtual attack, short of signing off from the game. In response to the VR sexual assault, the game-makers created a user command that allows a user to create a personal bubble that removes all other live players nearby.

Is Identity Theft a Felony?

Like many other crimes, identity theft is a wobbler. Depending on the state and the severity of the crime, identity theft can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony. Sometimes, it's not even called identity theft, but rather impersonation, or fraud. Generally, an identity thief will gain access to a person's bank or credit card information, or enough personal information to open a new credit card, and use the credit to make purchases or cash withdrawals or cash transfers.

Typically, when an identity thief uses their illicitly gained information to steal money, or make purchases, in the absence of specific identity theft laws, the crime will usually be treated like any other theft. Theft crimes tend to wobble between misdemeanor and felony charges depending on the circumstances and value of the stolen or illegally purchased items. Additionally, restitution is usually part of the punishment, regardless of whether it is charged as a felony or misdemeanor.

Since the assimilation of social media into everyday life became nearly unavoidable, lawmakers have been working to strengthen the laws prohibiting cyberbullying, cybercrime, and online threats. Potentially in spite of the Supreme Court ruling in 2014 that reversed the conviction of a man who posted his own original rap lyrics about his fantasy of killing his wife on social media, state's around the country continue to embrace new laws that create for a safer, less hostile online environment.

The Supreme Court's stance on online threats seems to land more in favor of characterizing even the most despicable speech as protected under the first amendment. Despite the Supreme Court's stance that the online harasser's intent matters, states can still regulate and prosecute people they believe have made credible online threats.

In these modern times where newspapers don’t use paper, the internet and computer technology has opened up a whole new world of potential crimes you may not even be aware are crimes. Even though the internet is still a wild wild west of sorts, there are many laws that allow law enforcement to arrest people for acting out online, and sometimes just for doing what is considered normal online activity.

Below are 5 computer crimes that can get you arrested in order from most likely to get you arrested to least likely.

Amid the recent allegations from the White House that the Russian government was involved in the DNC cyber attack, questions have been arising about the legality of international hackers interfering with elections. There are several laws on the books in the United States -- and in most countries -- that make it illegal to interference with an election, whether through cyber attack or otherwise. However, it's not so simple to determine how these laws can be enforced against a person in a different country.

The White House's recent position on the DNC hack has grave implications due to the strained relationship between the US and Russia. While there are numerous international agreements in place that address international espionage and cyber-crime, getting concrete proof that the attack came from Russian officials may not be possible. Additionally, to enforce US laws that address these issues would require extradition of the responsible party to US soil, so they could be tried in a US court.

The CEO of a popular classified ads website, Backpage.com, was arrested on Thursday on felony pimping of a minor, pimping and conspiracy to commit pimping, charges. CEO Carl Ferrer was arrested in Texas based upon the charges that California Attorney General Kamala Harris filed in California. The complaint alleges that Ferrer and Backpage.com have profited from the escort advertisements that get posted on Backpage.com by individual prostitutes, as well as escort services that are engaged in human trafficking.

Currently, Ferrer is being held on a $500,000 bond and will soon be extradited to California to face criminal chrages. Law enforcement is also currently investigating Ferrer and Backpage.com's offices in Texas. At this point, it is unclear whether Ferrer will also faces charges in a Texas court. If should also be noted, the two controlling shareholders of the site, Michael Lacey and James Larkin, currently have warrants issued for their arrest on similar charges.

5 Mugshot FAQs

Websites that post arrest mugshots online have been the subject of much laughter, but only at the expense of humiliating arrestees, both innocent and guilty. Additionally, the online posting of mugshots can create personal, social, and career problems for the individuals whose mugshots get posted.

The real problem herein lies in the fact that mugshots are taken after an arrest, but before a conviction. Even if a person is found innocent, arrested on accident, or even framed by the police, their mugshot can live on in infamy. To better understand this issue, here are 5 frequently asked questions about mugshots.

If you've been following the Slender Man story, both teenagers involved in the attempted murder of Payton Leutner have now pled not guilty by reason of insanity. Based on what has been reported about the attempted murder, that sounds about right as no rational explanation exists for the horrifying actions.

Payton Leutner was invited to a sleepover at a classmate's house along with one other classmate. The following day, while out in a park, the two other girls, then only 12 years old, attacked, stabbed, and attempted to murder Leutner. Fortunately, she was able to escape, and she has now recovered from her physical injuries.

Imagine a Venn diagram with overlapping circles of hacking, sexual harassment, and extortion -- that's 'sextortion,' a crime whereby a person threatens to distribute someone's private and sensitive information if they don't provide images of a sexual nature, sexual favors, or money. And while this may seem like a rare crime that only targets certain individuals, the FBI has indicated that sextortion incidents have been on the rise.

So how does sextortion work, exactly, and how can you protect yourself?

In the face of recent police shootings, almost everyone has an opinion. And while the First Amendment protects your right to say most things, even critiques of the police, freedom of speech does have its limits.

Those limits have been tested by some social media posts -- and the subsequent arrest of posters -- following the sniper attack that targeted police in Dallas. So what can you say about the cops on social media before they start knocking on your front door?