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The good news: There are fewer drunken drivers on the road. The not-so-good news: There are more "drugged drivers" on the road.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has released its 2013-14 survey of 9,000 drivers at 300 locations from coast to coast. The findings: 1.5 percent of weekend drivers had illegal blood-alcohol concentrations, down from 2.2 percent of drivers in 2007 and 7.5 percent of drivers in 1973. Meantime, Reuters reports that 10 times as many drivers surveyed, 15.2 percent, had illegal drugs in their system.

An increase in the prosecution and penalties for drunken driving offenses may be responsible for the drop in alcohol-influenced drivers. But what accounts for the rise in drugged drivers? And how does the law deal with drivers under the influence of legal and illegal drugs?

Although many criminal charges are very specific, others, such as criminal mischief, can encompass a wide variety of criminal behavior.

Criminal mischief generally includes what is commonly known as vandalism, dealing mainly with crimes committed against property such as defacing someone's building with graffiti or breaking the windows of a business. Although vandalism may be included under state criminal statutes forbidding "criminal damage" or "malicious trespass," in many states, vandalism may be charged as criminal mischief.

What typically counts as criminal mischief? Here are a few examples of criminal mischief laws in different states:

What is resisting arrest, and what defenses can potentially be used to defeat the charge?

A San Francisco public defender was arrested Wednesday after she refused to let police photograph her client in a court hallway. Notably, a police officer told her before she was placed in handcuffs that she would be arrested for resisting arrest.

Eventually, Deputy Public Defender Jami Tillotson was arrested, though a cellphone video shows that, far from "resisting," she let police cuff her and lead her away. So how can she be prosecuted for resisting an arrest that hadn't happened yet?

Most people are well aware that driving too fast or in a reckless manner is likely to get you pulled over. But a car's paint job may also attract the attention of law enforcement.

It's not against the law to have a crummy paint job or to paint your car an especially obnoxious color. Fortunately for most of us, the fashion police have not yet been granted the same power as the actual police to make arrests.

So how can your vehicle's paint job get you pulled over?

The Northeast is preparing for a snowstorm that could bring what The New York Times calls "near hurricane-force winds." the governors of Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey have declared states of emergency, with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordering a shutdown of the New York City subway and bus systems starting at 11 o'clock tonight.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio took the additional step of declaring a travel ban, also starting at 11 p.m. this evening. What does such a ban mean, and what happens if you disobey the order?

Attorney General Eric Holder announced Friday that the U.S. Justice Department will strictly limit local and state law enforcement agencies' use of so-called federal "adoptions" for civil asset forfeitures.

The federal asset forfeiture program originally began in the 1980s as part of the war on drugs, reports The Washington Post. At that time, few states had similar forfeiture laws; however, federal adoption of seized property allowed local and state law enforcement agencies to prevent seized property from being returned to criminals. But federal adoptions have continued to be used even as states passed their own forfeiture laws. According to the Post, since 2008 local and state police agencies have used a federal civil asset forfeiture program called Equitable Sharing to seize $3 billion worth of cash and property.

What do you need to know about Attorney General Holder's announcement? Here are five facts:

During a DUI stop, the results of a preliminary alcohol screening (PAS) test will often determine whether a driver is arrested or let go.

But there are some important differences between these preliminary alcohol tests and the testing of blood, breath, or urine following a DUI arrest.

What makes a PAS test different?

Although burglary, robbery, and theft are often used interchangeably, there are distinct differences between the three.

What the three have in common, of course, is that they all may involve the unauthorized taking of someone's personal property by another person (aka stealing). But beyond this shared link, burglary, robbery, and theft are all different crimes.

What are the differences between the three?

FindLaw's Blotter attempts to cover the latest in criminal news as well as provide common-sense explanations of the legal intricacies of the criminal justice system. With 2014 coming to a close, we've tried to reflect on the stories that have caught our readers' attentions most -- both news-based and general.

With that, here are the 10 most popular posts from FindLaw's Blotter in 2014:

New Year's Eve is a fantastic time to get together with friends and family and reflect on the year coming to a close. It's not really an opportune time to get arrested.

We don't mean that there's ever a great time to be arrested, but with the courts closed around the holidays, you may have to wait a bit longer for your arraignment if you can't make bail.

Here are five dumb ways to get arrested on New Year's Eve: