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Even the hardest, most jaded juvenile offender looks out of place in a jail. Juveniles are children. Their minds don't mature properly until their early twenties. So, why do we put children in jail? An Arkansas study found that youths who were previously incarcerated for a crime were 13.5 times more likely to commit another crime.

A better method of dealing with young offenders is juvenile probation. According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 61% of cases involving delinquent youths were granted probation instead of detention.

Here is what you need to know about juvenile probation:

After a long and winding legal road, a judge sentenced convicted killer Jodi Arias to life in prison without the possibility of parole. While the verdict itself felt like mere formality, the trial was anything but.

The case, in which Arias was accused of stabbing and shooting her boyfriend to death in 2008, garnered international infamy. And after she was convicted, her sentencing took on a legal life of its own. Now that the case has drawn to a close, here's a timeline of important events that led to the verdict:

A jury found Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all counts regarding his involvement in the 2013 bombing at the Boston Marathon. But the case isn't over yet, and the jury's work isn't finished.

Seventeen of the 30 charges for which Tsarnaev was convicted carry a possible death penalty, so now that jurors have found him guilty, they must decide whether to impose that penalty or life in prison. Let's take a look at these separate stages of capital punishment cases and how they work.

Closing arguments in Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's murder trial for 2013 Boston Marathon bombing began this morning. Prosecutors reviewed the evidence and told jurors Tsarnaev and his brother targeted "civilians, men, woman and children, because he wanted to make a point. He wanted to terrorize this country. He wanted to punish America for what it was doing to his people."

Tsarnaev has been charged with 30 counts in the bombing that killed 3 and injured over 260 others, and could face the death penalty if he is convicted as expected.

The Utah Senate has voted to allow a firing squad to carry out executions if the drugs necessary for lethal injections are not available.

The bill, which now heads to Gov. Gary Herbert's desk, would make Utah the only state to permit a firing squad to perform an execution.

If someone wrongs you, you may feel like seeking retribution. But is "an eye for an eye" revenge legal?

There short answer is no -- there is no "eye for an eye" law in the American criminal code. But why is such a simple concept not used more our legal system?

Here's a look at where the "eye for an eye" idea came from, and why it might not be able to work in modern society:

What Counts as Community Service?

In criminal cases, criminal offenders are sometimes ordered to perform community service in exchange for a reduction of fines or term of imprisonment. But the exact nature of this community service is not always specified by the court.

This can lead to disputes regarding what actually suffices for community service by a criminal offender. In one recent example, actress Lindsay Lohan may be facing jail time after she tried to count socializing with fans toward the 80 hours of community service she was ordered to perform for a reckless driving charge in 2012, reports Time. Prosecutors are arguing that Lohan's meeting with fans should not be counted towards her required community service.

So what does typically count as community service?

7 Common DUI Probation Conditions

In addition to fines and jail time, a DUI conviction can often result in a defendant being sentenced to probation.

Probation is a criminal penalty that permits a person convicted of a crime to be released back into society. However, an individual on probation does not enjoy the same level of freedom as a typical citizen. The conditions of a person's probation generally depend on the crime for which the conditions are being imposed, but they generally dictate the things a probationer must and must not do.

Here are seven common conditions of DUI probation:

Montana homeowner Markus Kaarma was convicted Wednesday of shooting and killing 17-year-old German exchange student Diren Dede, whom he caught in his garage.

The jury didn't buy that Kaarma had feared for his life when shooting the teen, as he had originally claimed, and found him guilty of deliberate homicide. ABC News reports that Kaarma is facing up to 100 years in prison, and sentencing is scheduled for February 11.

What does this deliberate homicide conviction mean for Kaarma?

A Virginia man has been sentenced to 43 years in prison for killing the mother of his two children over the prospect of paying child support.

Brandon W. Thomas, 28, stood before Judge Harold W. Burgess on Wednesday for sentencing on first-degree murder and felony firearm convictions. According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Thomas represented to the court that the investigation and prosecution's case were "biased, unprofessional, and negligent" and asked that the judge grant him a new trial.

Why did Thomas receive 43 years in this child support murder case?