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Inventor of 'Bullet Button' Skirts Spirit of New CA Gun Laws

Whenever state gun laws tighten restrictions on firearms, a demand is created for devices that will skirt the new restrictions. And that's just what has happened with the recent release of the "Bullet Button Patriot Mag Release," which defies California's new gun laws.

Days after Jerry Brown signed into law new language that made quick release of magazines more difficult, a company softened the sting for gun lovers by introducing a device that helps speed up reloading after the gun has been partially disassembled. No doubt demand is white hot.

Christian Dating Site Ordered to Allow LGBT Singles Access

A Superior Court in California has just penned off on a settlement that requires Christian Mingle to accommodate LGBT singles who use the site. Now, people visiting ChristianMingle.com aren't restricted to searching for a partner of the opposite sex; they can now search for same-sex matches. This will surely not be the last word on what will become part of the "religious freedom" movement.

ACLU Sues CA Court for Suspending Driver Licenses of the Poor

When Henry Washington was given a citation for driving an unregistered vehicle, the ensuing fine hit him harder than it would many Californians with more adequate means. After all, the reason he purchased the vehicle was to drive his brother to and from his required medical appointments. But the car couldn't pass smog. He choose to drive a dirty car to get his brother to his appointments. Soon, his license was suspended because he couldn't pay the fine.

This area between a rock and a hard place is all too common for many of California's poor, and the ACLU has recently filed a suit seeking some relief for those most affected.

Father of 2015 Paris Attack Victim Sues Social Media

The father of one of the victims who fell in the Paris attacks in late 2015 is suing Twitter and other social media platforms for their role in bringing the attacks about. Specifically, he has accused the defending parties of "providing material support for terrorism."

The defendants have responded by claiming that the Communications Decency Act shields them from liability associated with user posts. But in this delicate case, who will -- or should -- win?

Are Smart-Gun Mandates Coming to California?

Are we going big brother on guns? Should we? Does the Second Amendment right to bear arms guarantee a right to bear arms that are not tech-locked against a particular user?

Questions like these are at the very heart of the case of Pena v. Lindley, a gun safety lawsuit that's been many years in the making but now is finally closing in on the issue of how America regards guns.

California Says Guns in Bags Also Violate 'On Your Person' Laws

California whose gun laws are generally considered to be the most draconian in the nation just, got some backing by its highest court. According to the California Supreme Court, guns carried in pouches, backpacks and other such bags are also considered "on one's person" and as such, are in violation of state laws against concealed carry weapons.

Given the tectonic and bureaucratic processes to obtain a concealed carry weapon license in this state, the state Supreme Court's ruling could mean the only way you're going to legally have a gun in any city in California worth mentioning is to get shot and hope that someone puts a gun in your hands.

Is Your Fingerprint Protected by the Fifth Amendment?

By now, everyone's heard of the case of Paytsar Bkhchadzhyan, the 29 year old woman whose number of crimes nearly match her age. Last February, she was court-ordered to submit her fingerprint in order to access her iPhone that was seized at an Armenian Power gang member's residence in Glendale, California. But what are the legal implications?

Twitter v. USA Case Heats up in Oakland Court

A California federal district court took a little and gave a little in the Twitter versus government surveillance fight. The court agreed completely with a federal government argument that Twitter's complaint did not allege that information was not properly classified by the feds. However, the district judge did not concede to the government's change in venue request.

Twitter has about twenty days to amend its complaint to address concerns noted by the federal judge.

CA's Orange County Jailhouse Snitching Program Continues

Law enforcement continues to get battered in the court of public opinion. In general, law enforcement could really use a boost of good press.

Well, don't look to California. As if the state didn't have enough of its plate already, the now infamous Orange County jailhouse informant scandal threatens to shake law enforcement even more. So much for good press.

Quality School Education Is Not a Fundamental Right in CA

California's State Constitution does not guarantee children a minimum quality K-12 education, according to the First District Court of Appeal in San Francisco. The decision was reached amidst broad attention being directed towards the K-12 spending debate.

The disappointed plaintiffs have announced that they will appeal to the California Supreme Court.