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California may soon be getting rid of the religious and personal exemptions that let parents opt out of vaccinating their children before enrolling them in school, daycares or nurseries. A new bill imposing more robust child vaccination requirements has been approved by the state Senate and is well on its way to becoming law.

The law comes largely as a response to an outbreak of measles in Disneyland this winter, which spread to over 100 individuals across state and even national lines. Measles, like many diseases, is preventable through immunization, but California has some of the lowest vaccination rates in the country, with more than a quarter of schools having immunization rates below levels recommended by the C.D.C.

In the first major ruling interpreting California's decade old sex education law, a Fresno court has ruled that the northern California town of Clovis failed to provide adequate education when it adopted a 'abstinence-only until heterosexual marriage' curriculum.

After the Clovis school district refused to change the program, parents and the American Academy of Pediatrics sued. Clovis revised its program and the plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed their suit, but filed for attorneys fees. The school district opposed, describing the suit as a "costly nuisance" and claiming that it had prevailed in the litigation -- providing the court the opportunity to detail just how extensively the school's curriculum had violated the law.

With accusations of police brutality leading to unrest from Ferguson to Baltimore, many have called for law enforcement to wear body cameras. The thought is that body cam recordings will provide greater accountability, particularly following incidents such as the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, under highly disputed circumstances.

Who, though, will have access to that footage? A new bill being considered in California could prevent police officers from reviewing their own recordings when they have been accused of misconduct. At least, that was the idea initially. After resistance from law enforcement, the bill has been amended to allow officers to review body cam footage where not prevented by local policy.

In response to California's continuing drought, Governor Jerry Brown will be instituting unprecedented restrictions on water usage with the hopes of reducing urban water consumption, Brown announced yesterday. The move comes as California faces one of its most severe droughts on record.

The new water restrictions, expected to last through February, 2016, direct the State Water Resources Control Board to impose restrictions to reduce urban water consumption by 25 percent. The new restrictions could result not just shorter showers and less lawn sprinklers, but increased inspections and enforcement actions by the state.

Even though a federal district court found California's foie gras ban was pre-empted by federal law, federal district court orders aren't necessarily binding on nonparties, so the federal case may have to wait for the Ninth Circuit to step in.

But earlier this month, the First District Court of Appeal affirmed a state trial court decision that would let a lawsuit by the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) proceed against a Napa restaurant that served foie gras in violation of the law.

Our long statewide nightmare is finally over. Foie gras for everyone!

Back in 2012, legislation went into effect prohibiting "force feed[ing] a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird's liver beyond normal size." Also prohibited were any products made that way. Given that's exactly how foie gras is made, and to date, no one (except some random farmer in Spain whose foie gras is astonishingly expensive) can figure out how to make it any other way, foie gras was effectively banned in California.

Until Wednesday!

Among the 900 or so new laws taking effect in 2015, California is letting undocumented immigrants get state driver's licenses. Undocumented immigrants are already out there driving, but without licenses because they can't prove they're in the country legally.

If you're in the immigration biz, or even if you're not, here are five things you should know about the new law:

It's a big year for ch- ch- changes in California law. Starting in 2015, everything from human trafficking to massage therapy to emotional support animals will see some tweaks.

Here's what you should know in order to keep up to speed with some of the more high-profile changes to state law coming in the new year:

Cal. Bar Results Plummet Along With the Rest of America

You may have heard about the plummeting bar passage rates for the July 2014 examination. If not, you're not reading our Greedy Associates blog frequently enough. The gist is this: lowest passage rates in recent memory have led to finger-pointing between schools and the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The debate is over whether the test was scored or designed poorly, or whether the students were simply less able.

It's not surprising then to see that California's bar rate has also plummeted. According to the California Bar Journal, the passage rate was the lowest it has been in nearly 10 years -- a startling 48.6 percent. The drop comes on the heels of multiple consecutive years of a rising passage rate and is the lowest since July 2004, when 48.2 percent passed.

Leondra Who? Leondra Kruger, that's who. Kruger was nominated by Governor Jerry Brown to fill the seat vacated by Justice Joyce Kennard, who retired in April. Kennard's seat has been vacant since then, requiring various justices of the courts of appeal to sit in on cases in order to fill the seventh seat.

Kruger's nomination is a "mind blower," reported the Los Angeles Times, because, at 38, she's barely old enough to hold the position. That's not to say she's not qualified: With papers chased from Harvard and Yale, and a former boss named John Paul Stevens, she's legal eagle enough to sit on the state's highest court.