Celebrity Justice - The FindLaw Celebrities and The Law Blog


In a recent lawsuit filed against Drake, Future, and others associated with the artists' August 2016 joint concert in Nashville, Tennessee, an unnamed concertgoer alleges that a security guard raped her. She is seeking a multi-million dollar judgment from the performers, venue, and operators as a result of their negligent hiring and failure to keep her safe.

The case asserts that Drake, Future, the venue, and organizers, were negligent in hiring Leavy Johnson, who is accused of committing the rape. Johnson is currently facing criminal charges for the alleged rape. Additionally, it is alleged that prior to the concert, there were active outstanding warrants for Johnson's arrest due to other assault charges.

The endless legal saga of Roman Polanski rages on, this time with another accuser saying the she was also 'victimized' by the filmmaker in 1973 when she was just 16 years old. The 59-year-old woman, who gave only the name Robin, said she was forced to come forward after Samantha Geimer (the woman who originally accused Polanski of rape) allegedly urged a California judge to drop the charges against him. Robin was flanked by famous civil rights lawyer Gloria Allred.

"This infuriated me," Robin said. "I am speaking out now so that Samantha and the world will know that she is not the only minor Roman Polanski victimized."

With all the allegations flying between pop singer Taylor Swift and former Denver radio DJ David Mueller, it can be hard to keep them all straight. Lucky for us, a jury spent four hours sorting through the claims and counterclaims, and eventually came out on Swift's side.

The singer was awarded a symbolic dollar after she claims Mueller groped her at a 2013 media event. So what was actually going on? And if the jury believed Swift, why did she only get $1?

As Mr. Bond himself would tell you, 'there are some things that just aren't done. Such as, drinking Dom Perignon '53 above the temperature of 38 degrees.' And Mr. Bond would likely agree that selling a complete James Bond movie box set that was not actually complete is probably worse than Dom Perignon with ice.

A recent class action lawsuit, filed by one woman who was upset that her complete James Bond movie box failed to include two classics, seeks to right the wrong that James himself would insist be righted. After all, when a person buys a box set of James Bond movies that purports to contain all James Bond movies, people expect every James Bond movie to be included.

The Child Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) makes it illegal for app developers and third-parties to obtain the personal information of children under 13 years of age without first obtaining verifiable consent from their parents. The law was designed to keep companies from tracking kids online and targeting ads to unsuspecting children.

But a San Francisco mother claims Disney is using over 40 apps to spy on children, secretly collecting their personal information and sharing data illegally with advertisers. So is Disney really tracking your kids online? And if so, which apps do you need to look out for?

After serving nine years in prison for robbery and kidnapping, O.J. Simpson was granted parole today. "I've done my time," Simpson told the Nevada Board of Parole. "I've done it as well and as respectfully as I think anyone can."

The parole board was unanimous in its decision, and is now mulling Simpson's release date, which could come as early as October.

Gwen Stefani may be wishing she didn't speak a few fateful phrases last July during a concert in Charlotte, North Carolina. Stefani, while performing at the PNC Pavilion, instructed the crowd seated in the lawn section behind the actual music pavilion to come into the reserved seating area and to "just fill in anywhere you like."

After issuing that instruction from the stage, the crowd rushed the stage, getting past security personnel, breaking through security barricades and other security devices. During the rush to the reserved seating area, plaintiff Lisa Sticklin, who was seated in the reserved seating area, was trampled. Fortunately, her injuries were not fatal, however, she did suffer a broken tibia, and no doubt, suffered needless pain and suffering.

The Tupac Shakur biopic, All Eyez on Me, has certainly garnered quite a bit of media attention since its release in June 2017. However, in addition to the criticism on social media that the film misrepresents Tupac's life, a lawsuit has been filed claiming the film violates copyright law.

The copyright infringement case was filed by Kevin Powell, a former writer for VIBE magazine, who wrote three of the most widely read biographical articles on Tupac in 1994, 1995, and 1996. Powell alleges that his articles, along with his own life story, were used as the basis for the film, and that the film even stole the creative embellishments he added into the articles to protect Tupac.

The estate of J.R.R. Tolkien, who is widely considered the father of modern fantasy literature, has settled the $80 million lawsuit against Warner Bros. as a result of a dispute over the merchandising rights for "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit" movies. The films were adapted from Tolkien's seminal works by the same name, which were licensed to United Artists back in 1969.

At the heart of this dispute were allegations that Warner Bros., the distributor for United Artists, had gone overboard with their merchandising. Tolkien's estate asserted that the limited merchandising rights did not extend to all the different products being made, especially the casino slot machines that were named and based upon Tolkien's works. While no dollar amount has been publicly stated related to the lawsuit, one can only imagine that it is substantial, given that Tolkien's estate was willing to settle and publicly state the settlement was amicable.

This past week, Sir Paul McCartney was finally able to regain the copyrights to much of the Beatles' music catalog. The acquisition was part of a confidential settlement agreement related to a lawsuit filed this past January by McCartney seeking to regain individual songs that would meet the 56-year-old requirement in 2018.

The Beatles first single, Love Me Do, was released in 1962. So, by next year, the songs on that first album would be 56 years old. Under the Copyright Act, artists have the right to regain their copyrights after 56 years (or 35 years depending on the date of copyright), which cannot be waived by agreement.