Celebrity Justice - FindLaw Celebrity Law Blog

Celebrity Justice - The FindLaw Celebrities and The Law Blog


There are plenty of lies that fly back and forth between the characters on ABC's "How To Get Away With Murder," but sometimes the legal lies get overshadowed by the deceitful ones.

Episode 4 focused on a more white-collar criminal issue -- insider trading -- but much of the legal facts were swapped out for plot-convenient lies. Plainly put, "Let's Get Scooping" was trading in legal B.S. for much of the episode.

But which five of the legal lies from this "HTGAWM" episode were the most glaring? Here are our picks -- but first, our episode recap in 140 characters or less:

Joe Giudice, who you may know as Teresa Giudice's husband from "The Real Housewives of New Jersey," took a plea deal on Wednesday and may face deportation for yet another fraud case.

Joe would hate to one-up his wife in the criminal department, but it turns out he had a charge for driver's license fraud pending while the two were dealing with charges for mortgage fraud. TMZ reports that Joe was initially threatened with a 10-year prison sentence for the driver's license fraud, but he copped a plea to serve an 18-month sentence concurrently with his 41 months in prison on other charges.

He may not be receiving any additional prison time, but what could Joe's plea mean for his potential deportation?

Uma Thurman's former fiance Arpad Busson has filed suit for custody of the couple's 2-year old daughter.

Busson, a French financier, and Thurman, an actress known for her roles in "Pulp Fiction" and "Kill Bill," called off their wedding in April, reports the New York Daily News. Now Busson has filed papers in a New York court seeking custody of the couple's daughter Rosalind.

Although the records in this case are sealed, how is child custody between unmarried parents generally determined?

A former intern with "The Wendy Williams Show" is suing the production company Lionsgate over the fact that he and others should have been paid for their work.

Anthony Tart, in a potential class action filed in federal court, claims that he spent his unpaid internship doing menial tasks like washing dishes and taking out the trash. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Tart's proposed class action would encompass only those "former and current interns" on Wendy Williams' show, which he estimates at about 100 interns.

Will Tart succeed in getting Lionsgate to pay up?

"The Good Wife" is now in its sixth season, so it wouldn't have been surprising if it had taken its latest episode "Oppo Research" as a chance for a clip show.

But not so. Instead we are treated to a slightly new way to retread old paths, old characters, and old relationships. Too bad the law had very little to do with it.

Have you been watching ABC's "How To Get Away With Murder"? The latest episode of Shonda Rhimes' new hit drama introduced us to the (fake) law school's (fake) law journal, the Middleton Law Review. So we decided to co-opt the name for our inaugural review of the show that Viola Davis tries so hard to make work.

The first season's third offering, "Smile, or Go to Jail," can't seem to decide whether it's a procedural or a long-form mystery, and we have some outside advice for each member of Annalise's team about their roles in this drama.

But first, a spoiler-laden plot synopsis:

Comedian and filmmaker Tyler Perry is embroiled in a legal fight to build a movie studio on an old Atlanta Army base, but a federal court has ruled the latest lawsuit was premature.

Fort McPherson, a 488-acre property once used by the U.S. Army for something other than making "Madea" movies, was eyed by Ubiquitous Entertainment Studios as the new site of a "movie studio entertainment complex." According to The Hollywood Reporter, Tyler Perry then swooped in and negotiated with Atlanta city officials to purchase the base for $33 million, prompting Ubiquitous to sue... well, everybody.

So what's the latest in this Tyler Perry/Army base/movie studio drama?

"Modern Family" star Sarah Hyland was granted a restraining order against her ex-boyfriend actor Matt Prokop in Los Angeles Superior Court last week.

The 23-year-old actress requested the order, which was not contested by Prokop, after claiming that Prokop was abusive during their relationship which ended in August, reports The Associated Press.

What do you need to know about getting a restraining order like the one granted Hyland? Here are five lessons:

After eight months of separation, Paula Patton has filed papers in a Los Angeles court to divorce husband Robin Thicke.

Patton, an actress, and "Blurred Lines" singer Thicke have been married since 2005 and have a 4-year-old son together, reports CNN. Following the announcement earlier this year that the two had separated, Thicke has made a sometimes-uncomfortably public push to get back together with Patton, including releasing an album titled "Paula" dedicated to his wife.

Now that Thicke and Patton's marriage appears to be over, what legal issues may arise in what's sure to be a much-publicized divorce?

"Real Housewives of New Jersey" star Teresa Giudice is having second thoughts about her guilty plea now that she's facing prison time.

It seems strange, but several months after Teresa and Joe Giudice pleaded guilty to bankruptcy fraud, Teresa is ready for a do-over. According to E! News, the reality show mother and wife told Bravo's Andy Cohen that she "didn't understand" the part of her plea agreement where she'd be sent to prison.

What exactly didn't Teresa understand?