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'Melrose Place' Actress Amy Locane Charged with Vehicular Homicide

Amy Locane-Bovenizer's fatal car crash, killing the passenger of another car, wasn't in the script for the former "Melrose Place" actress who was formally charged with vehicular homicide.

Amy Locane-Bovenizer, an original cast member from television's "Melrose Place," is accused of drunken driving in New Jersey where she struck the passenger side of a car turning into a driveway, the New Jersey Star-Ledger reports.

According to court papers, Locane-Bovenizer, 38, and the mother of two admitted to police that she had consumed several glasses before driving.

Helene Seeman was pronounced dead the scene. Fred Seeman, who was driving, was flown to the nearest hospital.

Previous to the fatal crash, Amy Locane-Bovenizer rear-ended a car at an intersection and was reported by another driver as swerving and knocking down mailboxes.

In general, a person who is convicted of drunk driving most likely faces some or all of the following in terms of punishment: a fine; time in jail; suspension, restriction, or revocation of the defendant's driver's license; probation; enrollment and completion of a course in drunk driving or alcoholism.

In addition to these, states have also developed other penalties or requirements that drunk drivers must fulfill.

States have also modified their statutes to provide for enhanced sentences under some circumstances. These sentence enhancements may apply when one of the following events occur:

      (1) The defendant's BAC is very high, such as above .20 percent.
      (2) The defendant refuses to submit to chemical testing.
      (3) The defendant greatly exceeds the speed limit or drives recklessly while drunk.
      (4) A child under the age of 14 is in the car when the defendant is driving drunk.
      (5) Drunk driving is accompanied with an accident or injury to another person.

In this case, bail has been set at $50,000 and Locane-Bovenizer also faces a charge of third-degree assault by auto.