Taylor Swift Gets Restraining Order Against Alleged Stalker - Celebrity Justice
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Taylor Swift Gets Restraining Order Against Alleged Stalker

Taylor Swift's alleged stalker has been slapped with a restraining order after claiming that he'd "kill anyone who stands between them."

The man accused, Timothy Sweet, 33, claims that he and Swift are married, but TMZ reports that Sweet has been stalking her since 2011.

If Swift knew Sweet was trouble three years ago, why the restraining order now?

Never Ever Ever Together

According to TMZ, Sweet had allegedly dogged the 24-year-old singer since 2011, sending her emails, letters, and posting on social media. Some of the more troubling alleged missives from Sweet include:

  • "If anyone in Taylor Swift's family gets killed, it is not my fault."
  • "My wife, Taylor Swift (Sweet) and I live in Beverly Hills."
  • "Dearest Taylor, I'll kill any man who gets in the way of our marriage."

Although Swift has been romantically involved with notable celebrities and music icons like Joe Jonas, Taylor Lautner, Harry Styles, and John Mayer, Swift has never publicly acknowledged Sweet.

Until this court date, it seems.

Restraining Order: Everything Has Changed

Some may wonder why Swift took so long to deal with her alleged stalker. Maybe Swift was no longer the girl she was at "22." Regardless, the pop star convinced a judge on Monday to keep Sweet at least 100 yards from Swift and her family, according to TMZ.

Civil restraining orders can be obtained by petitioning a local court and swearing under oath the reasons why you believe the order is necessary. Before granting these orders, a judge will typically request to hear evidence of the alleged harassment or danger from the person who is to be restrained. In Swift's case, the three years' worth of threatening messages probably did the trick.

If harassment becomes a criminal matter, courts will often automatically file a temporary restraining order as soon as harassment charges are filed to prevent the defendant from visiting or communicating with the alleged harassment victim. This can become a more permanent order if the alleged stalker or harasser is convicted.

Swift's restraining order against Sweet will last at least until March 25, when a court hearing will discuss extending the restraining order, reports E! News.

Not exactly a "Love Story" for Swift.

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