Dos Equis' Most Interesting Man in Dull Legal Dispute - Celebrity Justice

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Dos Equis' Most Interesting Man in Dull Legal Dispute

The Most Interesting Man in the World is in the dullest of disputes, a legal battle over whether commissions were due his talent management agency. Jonathon Goldsmith, who plays Dos Equis Beer's advertising character, is being sued under a 2012 contract by a talent agency for its commission from the beer commercials, according to Ad Age.

The actor says the suit brought by Gold Levin Talent is frivolous and is jeopardizing his campaign with Dos Equis. He has countersued. Meanwhile the beer company claims it has no dog in the fight.

Commissions Dispute

A spokeswoman for the company Heineken USA, which owns Dos Equis, told Ad Age that "this is a personal matter for Jonathan that does not concern Heineken USA."

Meanwhile, former Heineken executive, who is apparently familiar with the campaign, confirmed the company's perspective. He said that since this is a question of business dealings gone wrong and "not a salacious lawsuit" the campaign should not be stained by the lawsuit. As such, it seems unlikely that Goldsmith will lose work because of the suit, as the actor claims.

Actor Goldsmith has filed a counterclaim in which he argues that the agency's actions have jeopardized not only his continued work on the Dos Equis Most Interesting Man campaign, but also other acting opportunities. He denies that the agency is due a commission and says that previous payments were just made to be polite.

Dogs in the Fight

Goldsmith is married to a former Gold Levin Talent Management agent, the woman who helped him land The Most Interesting man in the World Campaign. His wife left the agency in 2010 but continued to pay the agency commissions, "still grateful" for getting hired in 2004.

But Gold Levin insists that Goldsmith is shirking his responsibilities and depriving them of their 10 percent due on his work. The agency wrote in its filing, "Apparently Goldsmith's preference for Dos Equis intoxicated him into believing that he could ignore his promises and obligations." The lawsuit calls Goldsmith "The Least Honorable Man in the Entertainment Business."

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