Celebrity Justice - The FindLaw Celebrities and The Law Blog

What Money Can't Buy: Young Actress Busted at Coachella for Fake ID

Some people, like Disney star Kelli Berglund, 20, seem to have it all, and when they are so young! But what Berglund doesn't have, at least not now, is 21 years on the planet.

Without that, no amount of fame or fortune entitles her to legally consume alcohol in California, not even at the festival of the year. The young actress Berglund had to find this out the hard way, getting arrested at Coachella last week, before the music festival even got started officially.

Fake ID

Berglund presented a fake identification to security when she tried to get into a restricted section of the festival reportedly. Security reported the fake ID to the Indio Police Department, which is no doubt accustomed to dealing with a lot of stars and is not blinded by the brightness of their celebrity. Berglund was issued a citation and released.

The "Lab Rats" star was allowed to experiment with a good time despite getting in trouble. She was seen the next day at the Paper magazine party and documented her own festival adventures on social media reportedly.

Would the consequences for this young woman have been worse if she was less well known? Maybe so. Let's look at some of the serious consequences resulting from using a fake identification.

Criminal Consequences

Using a false identification, although it seems harmless, can be considered a felony in some states in certain contexts. Falsifying or tampering with or fabricating a government issued identification is a serious criminal offense.

For example, last year David Daleiden used false identification to enter Planned Parenthood in order to frame the organization for allegedly selling organs. He was charged with a felony by Texas prosecutors for the use of the fake identification to defraud based on the nature of his use.

Now the activist faces up to 20 years in prison for flashing that fake ID. In comparison, that definitely makes Kelli Beglund's little deception and subsequent citation sound like just some festival fun.

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