Celebrity Justice - The FindLaw Celebrities and The Law Blog

August 2017 Archives

Those of us who grew up on episodes of Bill Nye the Science Guy have no doubt about the popularity of the show. Equal parts hard science and zany voices, BNSG was the meat and potatoes of our after school diet. (Saved by the Bell was a gluttonous dessert.)

But according to a recent lawsuit, Nye himself may not have realized how financially successful his show was, and that might have been due to some fuzzy math on the part of the show's distributors. Nye is suing Walt Disney Company, Buena Vista Television, and a host of subsidiaries claiming they withheld profits from BNSG, to the tune of around $28 million.

The show that just won't die, starring people that won't just die, is facing legal claims that yes, probably will not just die. Former Walking Dead series producers Gale Anne Hurd, Glen Mazzara and David Alpert, along with co-creator Robert Kirkman, are suing AMC, claiming the studio and network conspired to set the show's licensing fees, in essence capping the profits producers, writers and actors could make.

So how do these fees work, and why are at the center of a potential $1 billion lawsuit?

In a recent lawsuit filed against Drake, Future, and others associated with the artists' August 2016 joint concert in Nashville, Tennessee, an unnamed concertgoer alleges that a security guard raped her. She is seeking a multi-million dollar judgment from the performers, venue, and operators as a result of their negligent hiring and failure to keep her safe.

The case asserts that Drake, Future, the venue, and organizers, were negligent in hiring Leavy Johnson, who is accused of committing the rape. Johnson is currently facing criminal charges for the alleged rape. Additionally, it is alleged that prior to the concert, there were active outstanding warrants for Johnson's arrest due to other assault charges.

The endless legal saga of Roman Polanski rages on, this time with another accuser saying the she was also 'victimized' by the filmmaker in 1973 when she was just 16 years old. The 59-year-old woman, who gave only the name Robin, said she was forced to come forward after Samantha Geimer (the woman who originally accused Polanski of rape) allegedly urged a California judge to drop the charges against him. Robin was flanked by famous civil rights lawyer Gloria Allred.

"This infuriated me," Robin said. "I am speaking out now so that Samantha and the world will know that she is not the only minor Roman Polanski victimized."

With all the allegations flying between pop singer Taylor Swift and former Denver radio DJ David Mueller, it can be hard to keep them all straight. Lucky for us, a jury spent four hours sorting through the claims and counterclaims, and eventually came out on Swift's side.

The singer was awarded a symbolic dollar after she claims Mueller groped her at a 2013 media event. So what was actually going on? And if the jury believed Swift, why did she only get $1?

As Mr. Bond himself would tell you, 'there are some things that just aren't done. Such as, drinking Dom Perignon '53 above the temperature of 38 degrees.' And Mr. Bond would likely agree that selling a complete James Bond movie box set that was not actually complete is probably worse than Dom Perignon with ice.

A recent class action lawsuit, filed by one woman who was upset that her complete James Bond movie box failed to include two classics, seeks to right the wrong that James himself would insist be righted. After all, when a person buys a box set of James Bond movies that purports to contain all James Bond movies, people expect every James Bond movie to be included.

The Child Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) makes it illegal for app developers and third-parties to obtain the personal information of children under 13 years of age without first obtaining verifiable consent from their parents. The law was designed to keep companies from tracking kids online and targeting ads to unsuspecting children.

But a San Francisco mother claims Disney is using over 40 apps to spy on children, secretly collecting their personal information and sharing data illegally with advertisers. So is Disney really tracking your kids online? And if so, which apps do you need to look out for?