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For fans of Louis CK, the recent news about the allegations against the comedian may not entirely be a surprise. After all, his comedy has always walked that fine line between inappropriate but still funny, and just totally wrong, which most "R" rated comics are known for walking.

In short, CK, allegedly, has a storied history of indecent exposure and sexual misconduct. It is claimed that he has exposed himself to several female comedians that he worked with in the past. Also, it is alleged that he would also go so far as to masturbate in front of others without consent. Given the current climate in Hollywood is finally recognizing that sexual misconduct has been a longstanding problem in the industry, these allegations have resulted in some serious fallout for the comedian.

Back in September, writer Meghan Herning posted a lengthy critique of Taylor Swift to the blog PopFront entitled "Swiftly to the alt-right: Taylor subtly gets the lower case kkk in formation." In it, Herring describes how the alt-right has latched onto Swift's songs in the past, and argues the lyrics and video for her latest single, "Look What You Made Me Do," and the accompanying music video bear "uncanny and unsettling" similarities to Hitler's rallies.

Swift's camp was, perhaps understandably, less than pleased. But rather than address the opinion directly via a statement or interview, Swift sent Herning a cease and desist letter, asking that the post be removed. Herning, perhaps understandably, sought the counsel of the American Civil Liberties Union. And rather than acquiesce to Swift's demands, the ACLU sent a pretty sternly worded letter of its own.

In a roundabout statement that ended with him coming out as gay, Kevin Spacey conceded he may have made sexual advances on actor Anthony Rapp when Rapp was just 14 years old. The statement caused furor in LGBTQ communities, bolstered more accusers to come forward, and led to the end of Spacey's popular Netflix drama "House of Cards."

While Spacey's reputation has certainly been damaged, will Rapp's allegations or Spacey's apology lead to any legal consequences for the actor?

The attorney-advisor for Harvey Weinstein, of the Weinstein Company, and Hollywood producer fame, just quit. Lisa Bloom, who gave an interview to Good Morning America, has been credited with calling the actions of Harvey Weinstein "gross." Additionally, in response to questioning about whether the sexual harassment of Weinstein was illegal, she agreed, but called his actions "workplace misconduct" rather than sexual harassment.

If you're just learning about this now, you've got a lot of catching up to do.

Sarah Palin, the former vice presidential nominee and politician, filed a defamation lawsuit against the New York Times this week in federal court. The case is over an editorial article that was published on June of this year which allegedly asserted that Palin incited the 2011 shooting that left congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords severely injured.

The original piece has since been edited. However, allegedly, Palin's crosshair's map was linked to the 2011 shooting in the opinion piece. The article discussed the state of American politics after the shooting of Representative Steve Scalise, on June 14, 2017, at a charity softball game practice.

While the exact amount of money Palin is seeking is not mentioned in the suit, she claims that her damages are minimally $75,000.

It's gotta be hard if you're a struggling artist and you think a major studio ripped off your idea. What's even harder, though, is backdating that idea, forging some sketches, and suing said studio in an attempt to extort a multimillion dollar settlement.

So hard in fact, that you'll probably be forced to withdraw your civil lawsuit, then get charged, indicted, and convicted on federal fraud and perjury charges, sentenced to two years in prison, and forced to pay the studio $3 million. Irony, right?

When it comes to child custody disputes, courts are generally going to be most concerned with what is in the best interests of the children. This usually includes figuring out which parent will provide a better, or more stable, household.

When it comes to celebrity child custody disputes, sometimes how a celebrity publicly portrays themselves can have an impact on a court's best interests inquiry. This is becoming rather clear in the recent Alex Jones child custody matter. While the judge in the matter has cautioned against turning the custody trial into a trial of Jones's talk show persona, there will likely be some evidence introduced linking Jones's real personal beliefs to the conspiracies and hate he promotes on his show.

Actress Amber Heard has filed a lawsuit against the producers of the movie London Fields as a result of an alleged breach of contract relating to nude and sex scenes she did not authorize in the producer's cut of the film. If you're not familiar with the movie, that's because it is yet to be released due to other litigation holding it up.

However, Amber Heard was not out looking for a legal battle. In November 2016, Ms. Heard, and the film's director Matthew Cullen, were sued by the film's producers for $10 million. The producers alleged Ms. Heard breached the contract by failing to finish some work on the film as well as failing to do promotional activities. Cullen was alleged to have changed the script in cahoots with Heard.

Molly Brazy, the 18-year-old rapper from Detroit, has the police investigating her after a Facebook-live video went viral. While the video itself doesn't seem to be anything more than a short exchange between her and a toddler while playing, what they were playing with caused the viral attraction.

In the short video, the toddler is shown asking for candy, then throwing a toy gun towards Brazy. Brazy, then, clearly in a playful, joking manner, picks up the toy and points it at the child. After the internet world went abuzz with controversy over whether the toy gun was real, police got involved.

The focus of the investigation is on whether the toy gun was real or not. Brazy could be facing child endangerment charges if it is determined that the gun was real. Despite the fact that Brazy is insisting it was not, police are committing resources to have the video analyzed.

Jay Z, known legally as Shawn Carter, has sold drugs, spit rhymes, steered Def Jam Records, and started restaurants, clothing lines, sports agencies, and streaming music services. Now he's going after the big bucks. The rapper/entrepreneur is launching his own venture capital firm, aimed at funding seed-stage companies.

It's not Jay Z's first foray into investing, but it might be his biggest.