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It's gotta be hard if you're a struggling artist and you think a major studio ripped off your idea. What's even harder, though, is backdating that idea, forging some sketches, and suing said studio in an attempt to extort a multimillion dollar settlement.

So hard in fact, that you'll probably be forced to withdraw your civil lawsuit, then get charged, indicted, and convicted on federal fraud and perjury charges, sentenced to two years in prison, and forced to pay the studio $3 million. Irony, right?

When it comes to child custody disputes, courts are generally going to be most concerned with what is in the best interests of the children. This usually includes figuring out which parent will provide a better, or more stable, household.

When it comes to celebrity child custody disputes, sometimes how a celebrity publicly portrays themselves can have an impact on a court's best interests inquiry. This is becoming rather clear in the recent Alex Jones child custody matter. While the judge in the matter has cautioned against turning the custody trial into a trial of Jones's talk show persona, there will likely be some evidence introduced linking Jones's real personal beliefs to the conspiracies and hate he promotes on his show.

Actress Amber Heard has filed a lawsuit against the producers of the movie London Fields as a result of an alleged breach of contract relating to nude and sex scenes she did not authorize in the producer's cut of the film. If you're not familiar with the movie, that's because it is yet to be released due to other litigation holding it up.

However, Amber Heard was not out looking for a legal battle. In November 2016, Ms. Heard, and the film's director Matthew Cullen, were sued by the film's producers for $10 million. The producers alleged Ms. Heard breached the contract by failing to finish some work on the film as well as failing to do promotional activities. Cullen was alleged to have changed the script in cahoots with Heard.

Molly Brazy, the 18-year-old rapper from Detroit, has the police investigating her after a Facebook-live video went viral. While the video itself doesn't seem to be anything more than a short exchange between her and a toddler while playing, what they were playing with caused the viral attraction.

In the short video, the toddler is shown asking for candy, then throwing a toy gun towards Brazy. Brazy, then, clearly in a playful, joking manner, picks up the toy and points it at the child. After the internet world went abuzz with controversy over whether the toy gun was real, police got involved.

The focus of the investigation is on whether the toy gun was real or not. Brazy could be facing child endangerment charges if it is determined that the gun was real. Despite the fact that Brazy is insisting it was not, police are committing resources to have the video analyzed.

Jay Z, known legally as Shawn Carter, has sold drugs, spit rhymes, steered Def Jam Records, and started restaurants, clothing lines, sports agencies, and streaming music services. Now he's going after the big bucks. The rapper/entrepreneur is launching his own venture capital firm, aimed at funding seed-stage companies.

It's not Jay Z's first foray into investing, but it might be his biggest.

Before Donald Trump was elected president, there were many questions about the ethical conflicts he might face if he failed to divest himself from his many business ventures. After his election, the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington even filed a lawsuit citing those concerns.

But perhaps those worried that business interests would invade the White House were worried about the wrong Trump. In a libel lawsuit against British tabloid the Daily Mail, Melania Trump appears to consider her role as First Lady to be a "unique, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity" to make millions of dollars.

Frank Ocean, the singer-songwriter that gained repute in 2011 with his hit single Novacane, has recently been sued by his own father for libel, defamation, sinning, and more. The lawsuit stems from a Tumblr blog post that Ocean published as a reaction to the Pulse Nightclub shooting that took place on June 12, 2016. Ocean, who identifies as gay, was shaken by the shooting at the nightclub, which was a popular spot for the gay community, and published his thoughts on the tragedy on Tumblr. Through the lawsuit, he is seeking $14.5 million.

In the Tumblr post, Ocean recalls the first time he heard the use of the pejorative f-word used to demean homosexuals. Allegedly, Ocean was with his father at a diner, when his father used the word to describe a transgendered waitress. Then, Ocean and his father left, and Ocean recalled that his father said the waitress was dirty. Additionally, Ocean remarked in that same post that the same day his father did that, was the same day his father left him. Previously, in a New York Times profile, Ocean refused to say anything about his father other than that he left when Ocean was 6, and that he was a failed musician who "went crazy."

Robert O. Young, the creator of the pH Miracle Diet, which was praised by Kate Hudson, was arrested in 2014 and convicted in 2016 of practicing medicine without a license. He is still out on bail as he awaits a retrial on several charges that a jury could not reach a decision on. However, based on the three charges he has been found guilty of, he is looking at about three years in jail.

The pH diet he created is, according to experts, completely bogus. Unfortunately, before it became widely known that Young's diet was basically a scam to cheat the terminally ill and their families, thousands of people bought into his claims of acidity being the root of all evil. He sold millions of books worldwide, and even opened up the "pH Miracle Ranch" where he treated (or, more aptly, scammed) approximately 15 individuals claiming that an intravenous solution of baking soda would cure them.

The individual that hacked into Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, and other celebrity iCloud accounts was sentenced to 9 months in prison and $5,700 in restitution for his crimes. The hacker used a targeted phishing scheme that tricked the celebrities into revealing their login credentials. Once he had their credentials, he was able to login to their accounts and access the private information as well as intimate photos of Lawrence, Upton, and other celebrities.

Surprisingly, the hacker is not being charged with selling, posting, or distributing any of the information he downloaded or accessed illegally. His plea agreement was only to one count of unauthorized access of a protected computer. While the maximum sentence for that crime is 5 years, the prosecution was agreeable to the short 9 month sentence.

America's first celebrity president is having a bit of trouble finding celebrities to perform at his inauguration. While the list of confirmed performers sits at the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and 16-year-old former America's Got Talent singer named Jackie Evancho, the list of those who've declined Donald Trump's invitations includes varied luminaries from Elton John to Garth Brooks and Andrea Bocelli to Kiss.

One group of performers' famous legs were straddling the fence on whether to perform for the infamous President-elect: initial reports said the Radio City Rockettes were being forced by their employer to dance at the inauguration, but it now looks like participation at the event will be voluntary. So how many will show?