Common Law - The FindLaw Consumer Protection Law Blog

Ford Announces Major Recall of 1.4M Cars

Under product liability laws, companies generally have a duty to protect consumers from potential dangers. That's why when a company discovers that there's a defect in one of their products, it issues a recall. While any type of product can be recalled for defects, it seems that the most common recalls involve food and cars.

The most recent recall involves cars made by Ford Motor Company. More specifically, Ford has issued a recall of 1.4 million vehicles in North America for steering wheel bolts that can potentially become loose.

3 Tips to Protect Your Personal Information

There's a balance between the convenience that advancement in technology has provided with the fact that it's created new avenues for potential scams. For this reason, it's important to be aware of the current scams that are going around during a given period of time, like the FedEx shipping scam that occurred during the holidays, and to take certain steps to protect yourself.

It's also important to report any scams you become aware of, as they can help identify the scammer or at least get the word out. Here are some helpful tips to protect your personal information, so that you don't fall victim to identity theft.

Millennials Are Most Likely to Get Hit With Financial Scams

Young people tend to think they're smarter than their parents and especially their grandparents. But, according to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), last year Americans in their twenties lost more money in financial scams that those over seventy years old. More specifically, 40 percent of millennials indicated that they lost money to fraudulent schemes compared to the 18 percent of older consumers (those 70 and older) who reported that they lost money as a result of fraud.

Of note, however, is the fact that the median loss for those 20-29 years old was $400, while the median loss for those in their 70s was $621 and those in their 80s or older was $1,092.

Anti-Aging Claims of TA-65MD Challenged by FTC

Most people want to be able to stay young, and while some people turn to surgery to stop the aging process, others use various creams and serums that promise anti-aging properties. Unfortunately, not all anti-aging products actually stop or reverse the aging process.

Take for example TA-65MD and TA-for 65 Skin sold by Telomerase Activation Sciences and its CEO, Noel Thomas Patton. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), these products lack scientific substantiation for their anti-aging claims.

Woman Charged $17,850 for Urine Test

How much should you pay to pee in a cup? A Texas woman's case has made headlines after her seemingly routine, post-surgical urine test came back at $17,850 dollars. 

It's part of an unwelcome trend in the drug testing industry that some link to the opioid crisis. Others just chalk it up as part of America's broken healthcare system. Lawyers link it to the exorbitant, and sometimes fraudulent, billing practices in the healthcare industry.

Smucker Company Dog Food Recalled After Euthanasia Drug Scare

What wouldn't you do for your four-legged best friend? 

The connection we share with dogs makes it especially scary to find out that your constant companion (or at the very least furry friend) could suffer because of something you feed them. Unfortunately, that's the latest scoop in a series of dog food recalls, initiated as a result of the euthanasia drug pentobarbital being found in canned dog food manufactured by the J.M. Smucker Company.

Coinbase Overcharging Users and Emptying Bank Accounts

Keep an eye on your bank account! It's good advice at all times, but for cryptocurrency enthusiasts it's especially true right at the moment. Customers of Coinbase, a cryptocurrency exchange, are reporting that the company is overcharging, double-charging, and in some cases emptying their bank accounts with unauthorized transactions.

Panera Bread Recalls Cream Cheese Nationwide for Listeria

Bagel Breakfasters beware. The bakery-cafe chain Panera Bread is voluntarily recalling a chunk of its cream cheese products sold nationwide, after a sample tested positive for listeria. The voluntary recall is preventive, and (to date) there have been no reports of illness linked to the company's creamy spreads.

After the housing bubble burst way back in 2008, big banks had quite a few foreclosures on their hands. Only they didn't do a great job of managing those foreclosures. In 2011, the Federal Reserve found banks like Ally Financial, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, and SunTrust botched thousands of foreclosures and ordered them to tidy up their mortgage servicing.

And now, finally, in 2018, the Fed has finalized its enforcement action against the remaining banks, fining five of them a total of $35.1 million.

Researchers at Consumer Reports think they've discovered the source of a deadly E. coli outbreak in the U.S. and Canada last week: romaine lettuce. The outbreak began in November 2017 and has sickened dozens, hospitalized five, and killed at least two people.

While the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention was careful not to link the outbreak to a specific source before further inquiry, the Public Health Agency of Canada was confident in identifying romaine lettuce as the source of the outbreak. So why are people getting sick, what should they do, and can you file a wrongful death lawsuit for E. coli poisoning?