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The makers of a drinkable sunscreen, Osmosis Harmonized H2O, are being sued by the Iowa Attorney General due to claims of fraud and deceiving consumers. The makers claims that by drinking five pumps of this water, that has been exposed to "proprietary frequencies in the form of scalar waves" from their harmonizer machine, a person can be protected at the same level of a SPF 30 sunscreen for 3 hours. The Iowa AG has called these shaky claims into question, and despite the less than 3.5oz bottle of drinkable sunscreen costing $30, is seeking $40,000 per consumer.

The actual lawsuit goes so far as to call the product's allegedly scientific basis "pure bunk" and "pseudo-science at its worst," explaining that there is no scientific fact to support the claims made. Additionally, it was never disclosed that the doctor that drafted a report in support, in 2014, had not been licensed to practice medicine since 2001. Significantly, the report was neither peer reviewed, nor published.

Evanger's Dog and Cat Food issued a voluntary recall last month amid concerns that a common animal euthanasia drug contamination in their products was linked to five pets' illnesses and the death of one pet. Just this month, Evanger's updated their recall to include two additional product lines potentially manufactured with the same drug contaminated beef. The euthanasia drug, pentobarbital, was found by the FDA in two cans produced by Evanger's that were linked to the same batch of meat that caused the illnesses and death.

Although toys have come a long long way over the past few decades, parents are right to be concerned about getting young kids toys that connect to the internet. If you were considering purchasing a 21st century stuffed animal for your 21st century kid, you might want to consider getting something other than a Cloudpet.

Actually, considering the massive data breach suffered by Cloudpets, you might just want to avoid getting kids any sort of toys that connect to the internet, or at least avoid being an early adopter.

There are hearts breaking wide open all over the world. It was recently discovered that the nearly 60-year-old Sophie the Giraffe children's chew/teething toy could potentially be dangerous due to mold. While the moldy chew toy problem is not unique to Sophie the Giraffe, owners of the $25 piece of rubber are up in arms after the recent discovery. The toy has been heralded by celebrities, including Madonna, and was even featured in the Tom Selleck, 80s classic, "Three Men and a Baby."

Basically, toys like Sophie the Giraffe, which have air trapped inside with virtually no air circulation inside, can easily develop mold if water finds it way inside the toy. Frequently, and extremely commonly, anytime you give anything to a baby, they're going to put it into their mouths. If it falls on the floor, parents frequently will wash a toy that gets frequently chewed on. However, all that exposure to water increases the risk of water getting inside and mold forming.

Parents, beware! Those brightly colored, bite-sized laundry pods not only shouldn’t be eaten by your kids, but if your kids play with them, you need to watch out for eye injuries. While most people don’t expect laundry detergent to cause eye burns, those packets of detergent frequently contain stronger chemicals than one might expect. In fact, the detergents are designed to be diluted by water in order to not cause damage to clothing. The detergents frequently react differently when put in contact with skin or eye tissue.

If the packet bursts, the chemical detergent can cause burns on a person’s eyes, even if the liquid does not spill in a person’s face. Frequently, when children break one of these packets, or pods, the detergent is transferred to their eyes from their hands or fingers as a result of rubbing their face or eyes. What is most shocking is that apparently over a quarter of all eye injuries for children aged 3 to 4 are from these pods. 

In our modern times of glasses made by Google, Bluetooth technology, and smart telephones, parents are increasingly wiring their children, and even their babies, up with wearable tech. While most parents and professionals would agree that being able to monitor where your child is via GPS is helpful, there is growing disagreement about wearables for babies. The market for such devices has exploded over the past few years. Now there are socks that measure a baby's pulse, pacifiers with thermometers, onsies that provide breathing a movement data, and a whole host of other types of baby-wearables that push your baby's data onto your smart phone's app.

Generally, there has been no big news story about a baby being injured due to wearable technology. In fact, one such device maker claims that in the 300,000 units his company has sold, he has not heard of a single infant death. Nevertheless, there are currently no wearable tech items for babies that are approved by the FDA. Additionally, numerous studies have been published which discourage the use of wearables for infants.

Drinkers of craft beer, take note: Sierra Nevada has issued a recall for the Midwest, East Coast, and the South on many of their popular 12-oz bottled beers. Fortunately, the recall is focused on a rather short production window, and the bottles and packaging are made in such a way that spotting a recalled Sierra Nevada is rather simple. So far, there have been no reported injuries.

Basically, there is a defect in the way one of their bottling plants was bottling their beverages. The defect could cause a little bit of the top to break off into the beer, exposing drinkers to potentially drinking broken glass, as well as flat beer.

When it comes to child safety, parents tend to pull out all the stops ... or maybe parents are the ones actually putting in all the stops. Regardless, a recent study about baby teething toys, or chew toys, which are not regulated in the same category as baby bottles, has shown that "BPA-free" may not actually really mean BPA-free. The study showed that not only did toys labeled as "non-toxic" contain toxic chemicals, but a majority of toys labeled as "BPA-free" actually contained BPA.

The study was designed to look at whether baby teething toys contained EDCs (endocrine disruptor chemicals), BPA, and other toxic chemicals. EDCs are harmful chemicals that can affect a person's development in many ways. Because all the harmful links between BPA, EDCs, and other toxins remain unknown, some researchers suggest avoiding as many as possible.

A recently filed lawsuit in the Northern District of California Federal Court alleges that Coca-Cola engaged in unfair and deceptive marketing practices in an effort to mislead consumers. While there is no claim of tampering with the results of the Coke Versus Pepsi challenge results, the lawsuit does claim that the beverage-maker intentionally downplayed the harmful health effects of sugar in their advertising. Additionally, the suit alleges that Coca-Cola has deliberated focused marketing on children despite having pledged not to do so.

This case is part of the larger war on sugar. Makers of sugar-sweetened beverages, and food products that needlessly contain high-fructose corn syrup, have found themselves coming under increased scrutiny over the past decade as a result of the relatively new found public awareness of the dangers of sugar. The organization that filed suit specifically stated when asked about Pepsi, that they were not sued because Pepsi doesn't misrepresent the effects of sugar to consumers.

Counterfeit toys are a problem year-round, but during the holiday season the problem is especially pronounced. When people are trying to find those highly sought after toys, counterfeiters are hard at work trying to make cheap replicas that will fool a purchaser, and disappoint (and potentially harm) a recipient. Despite the best efforts of customs and other federal investigators, counterfeit toys do get through and get sold to unsuspecting consumers.

Some fake toys can look identical to the originals, but may contain differences that are imperceptible to the naked eye, such as using lead based paint. One of the biggest concerns when it comes to fake toys are the materials that get used. Toy safety is a highly regulated industry that requires manufacturers to comply with extensive safety regulations. Counterfeiters ignore these regulations which, in turn, put children's lives in peril.