Common Law - The FindLaw Consumer Protection Law Blog

Recently in Consumer Rights Category

Anti-Aging Claims of TA-65MD Challenged by FTC

Most people want to be able to stay young, and while some people turn to surgery to stop the aging process, others use various creams and serums that promise anti-aging properties. Unfortunately, not all anti-aging products actually stop or reverse the aging process.

Take for example TA-65MD and TA-for 65 Skin sold by Telomerase Activation Sciences and its CEO, Noel Thomas Patton. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), these products lack scientific substantiation for their anti-aging claims.

Woman Charged $17,850 for Urine Test

How much should you pay to pee in a cup? A Texas woman's case has made headlines after her seemingly routine, post-surgical urine test came back at $17,850 dollars. 

It's part of an unwelcome trend in the drug testing industry that some link to the opioid crisis. Others just chalk it up as part of America's broken healthcare system. Lawyers link it to the exorbitant, and sometimes fraudulent, billing practices in the healthcare industry.

After the housing bubble burst way back in 2008, big banks had quite a few foreclosures on their hands. Only they didn't do a great job of managing those foreclosures. In 2011, the Federal Reserve found banks like Ally Financial, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, and SunTrust botched thousands of foreclosures and ordered them to tidy up their mortgage servicing.

And now, finally, in 2018, the Fed has finalized its enforcement action against the remaining banks, fining five of them a total of $35.1 million.

Researchers at Consumer Reports think they've discovered the source of a deadly E. coli outbreak in the U.S. and Canada last week: romaine lettuce. The outbreak began in November 2017 and has sickened dozens, hospitalized five, and killed at least two people.

While the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention was careful not to link the outbreak to a specific source before further inquiry, the Public Health Agency of Canada was confident in identifying romaine lettuce as the source of the outbreak. So why are people getting sick, what should they do, and can you file a wrongful death lawsuit for E. coli poisoning?

If you google 'AARP elder abuse,' your first 30 or so results are pages of the American Association of Retired Persons' efforts to combat the emotional and financial abuse of elderly people. But the same non-profit that touts its efforts to protect elders is now being sued for defrauding them.

A new class action lawsuit filed in California accuses AARP of elder financial abuse, claiming it has been taking kickbacks from UnitedHealth Group for selling AARP-branded health insurance plans, overcharging its members in the process.

The class action lawsuit is one of the few tools consumers and the public have against misbehaving large corporations. They've been utilized in environmental protection cases against polluters and consumer safety cases against dangerous products. A proposed new rule would allow similar protections for victims of predatory, deceptive, or unfair business practices by banks and other financial institutions, but that rule was voted down today.

Vice President Mike Pence broke a 50-50 tie in the Senate as Republicans continue to roll back Obama-era policies designed to reign in Wall Street.

As great man once said, "There's a time and place for everything -- and it's called college." And in a place where anything can happen, not all of those things are good.

From flood damage and pranks gone wrong, to simple theft or misappropriation, some bad things can happen to a college student's dorm room. Does that mean they need to insure those rooms, and their belongings?

When a person goes into a pharmacy to pick up their prescription, they expect that only having to pay the required insurance co-pay is actually a good deal. Otherwise, what's the point of prescription coverage? But what if instead of a co-pay, you were being charged an "over-pay"?

A recent federal lawsuit filed by a San Francisco man against Walgreens in Northern District Court of Illinois alleges that insured customers are actually being charged more for their medications than those who don't use insurance. In fact, it is alleged that insurance co-pays can be significantly higher than the cash price of the same medication for a person without prescription coverage.

A new enforcement unit within the U.S. Justice Department in Chicago has been formed to fight health care fraud. The new Health Care Fraud Unit was announced around the same time as the announcement of the major $1.2 billion prosecution for a massive health care fraud scheme.

The goal of the unit is to seek out and prosecute the individuals and businesses that engage in all types of health care fraud. Acting U.S. Attorney Joel R. Levin, when announcing the new unit, explained that "Every year, health care fraud causes millions of dollars in losses to Medicare and private insurers" and that "Health care fraud also often exploits patients through unnecessary or unsafe medical procedures."

The Federal Aviation Administration is now offering to refund all drone and model aircraft hobbyists that had to register their flying machines and pay the FAA's $5 fee. Over 800,000 people have registered drones since 2015, however, not all drone owners will qualify for a refund.

A recent decision for the Court of Appeals for the Federal District invalidated the drone-hobbyist registration requirement.The decision explained that under a prior law, the FAA was prohibited from making new rules covering model aircrafts, and the registration requirement qualified as a new rule.