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Few things are as terrifying as the thought of a loved one, especially a child, being kidnapped. So when the phone rings and someone says they have your daughter and will kill her immediately if you hang up or fail to wire $10,000, most parents will do whatever is possible to save their child.

That's exactly the kind of compliance scam artists are counting on when they call unsuspecting parents and relatives, a practice that's been on the rise in recent years.

Unfortunately, in real life, hackers are not wiping out all our credit card and student loan debt. While there are legitimate and positive benefits to hacking, and many hackers never do anything malicious, some do engage in illegal, fraudulent, and exploitative actions. With new data breaches being reported almost weekly, many people often wonder what hackers even do with all that stolen data.

Typically, we think of stolen data as a problem for businesses, or in terms of corporate espionage; however hackers have learned to get much more creative, and even more elusive, with what they do with stolen data. Individuals are at as much as risk as businesses, but unlike businesses, individuals often cannot afford to suffer the consequences.

Simply stated, a keylogger is a piece of hardware or software that logs every single keystroke made on a computer's keyboard. Basically, it's an invisible set of eyes watching and recording every single press of a key on a keyboard. The use of keyloggers has been portrayed in television and movies as an easy way for hackers to steal usable information.

In real life, hackers use keylogging to steal account numbers, usernames, passwords, financial information, ATM pin codes, and more. However, it is worth noting that there are some legitimate uses for keylogging, such as industrial design, and when the good guys need to engage in hacking or espionage.

Nearly every internet user has encountered some form of the tech support scam in their browsing history. Although these tech support scams are rather common, the level of sophistication can vary as the majority of these are just online phishing scams.

The most common tech support scams involve a user getting a pop-up window, or redirected to a webpage, that warns the user that their computer is or may be infected by a virus. From there, the user either downloads software recommended by the warning, or calls a phone number. In either scenario, a scammer will be trying to either get the user to send them money, or steal bank account information, or other sensitive data.

We live in a 21st century digital world. That means that parents need to watch out for what their kids are doing, digitally. The apps of today have taken technology a step further towards the danger zone.

Below is a list of five types of apps that could actually be really dangerous to kids, and even adults. However, for parents, there is an added layer of difficulty, and this comes from "Vault" apps. Vault apps are designed to hide other apps, photos, videos, and other content, that a phone's owner might want to keep hidden from others.

The Wounded Warriors Support Group is a non-profit created to provide emotional support to wounded war veterans in the form of equestrian activities. But a recent lawsuit filed by the California State Attorney General claims that the organization is a fraud. This organization shouldn't be confused with the Wounded Warriors Project, which is a legitimate charity.

In short, a husband and wife, their two adult children, and the family's two businesses, have all been implicated in a fraudulent charity scheme. The family is accused of using the charitable donations received to finance their personal lives, hobbies, and businesses. The charity was supposed to use the contributions to connect wounded veterans with horses for therapeutic purposes.

While nearly anything can be purchased online these days, the FDA has issued safety suggestions when it comes to buying prescription drugs online. The safety suggestions are to help ensure that consumers do not purchase prescription medications that are unsafe, or counterfeit.

Generally, consumers are warned against purchasing prescription drugs from any online retailer that does not require a person to actually have a valid prescription. Believe it or not, there are many illegal businesses that openly advertise illegal services online as though those services were perfectly legal. Since there is a rather large demand for many prescription medications from drug abusers, there are many online businesses that are willing to cater to the demand, legal or not.

The Securities Exchange Commission has announced enforcement actions against 27 different entities and individuals connected to the deceptive dissemination of promotional news about stocks. The actions allege that these entities and individuals promoted stocks or investments without disclosing financial ties to the stock or investment.

Specifically, the individuals and entities were charged with deceiving investors by failing to disclose that published information was not independent, nor unbiased. Under federal securities law, if a company or individual publishes information promoting a stock or investment, the writer or publisher must clearly state whether the information was paid-for, or if the writer or publisher has a self interest in promotion.

A new type of phishing scam is circulating via email that's targeting schools and universities. The scammers' malicious game is likely to leave their victims beyond confused when they find out scammers did their taxes!

Basically, the scam works like this: Scammers send HR departments emails attempting to get large batches of employee social security numbers alongside corresponding W-2 forms. Once the scammers have those, they go ahead and file a person's tax return in order to steal the tax refund.

Savvy social media users know feeds can be filled with fake news, false advertisements, and other scams. And Bitcoin, the online "cryptocurrency" that promises anonymity and security to its users, is not immune to the social media scam.

ZeroFOX, a cyber security company that monitors cloud-based software and social media for threats and scams, has uncovered a few new scams targeting Bitcoin users on social media, from basic malware downloads to complicated Ponzi schemes. Here's what you need to know.