Common Law - The FindLaw Consumer Protection Law Blog


Recently in Product Recalls Category

Vulto Creamery, makers of handmade raw milk cheeses, has been named in the wrongful death lawsuit brought on behalf of a Vermont man that died as a result of listeria contamination back in November 2016. The lawsuit, filed by his widow, explains that Richard Friedman consumed the Vulto Creamery's cheese in October, before he fell ill due to the listeria contamination. After over a week in a hospital, Friedman suffered a stroke believed to be related to, or a result of, the listeria poisoning.

At this time, there have been six reported hospitalization, and two deaths, related to the specific strain of listeria that contaminated the Vulto raw milk cheese, all of which were reported between September 1, 2016 and the end of January 2017. The FDA and CDC began investigating the matter at the end of January 2017.

Evanger's Dog and Cat Food issued a voluntary recall last month amid concerns that a common animal euthanasia drug contamination in their products was linked to five pets' illnesses and the death of one pet. Just this month, Evanger's updated their recall to include two additional product lines potentially manufactured with the same drug contaminated beef. The euthanasia drug, pentobarbital, was found by the FDA in two cans produced by Evanger's that were linked to the same batch of meat that caused the illnesses and death.

Peanut allergy sufferers, take note: If you or anyone you know eats I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter, a popular peanut-free peanut butter alternative, the company that makes the product has issued a warning for consumers to not eat the product. A voluntary recall has also been issued because of an E. Coli outbreak linked to SoyNut Butter's granola products as well. At this time, there are just over 15 people who have been confirmed to have contracted the pathogen.

Unfortunately, the E. Coli contamination can cause serious illnesses, and there have been a handful of reports that young children have suffered from kidney failure as a result of eating the product. Although a lawsuit has already been filed, as the recall is still relatively new, more claimants are expected to come forward with claims.

When the Takata airbag recall was announced, millions of car owners were shocked to discover that their cars were on the list. According to reports, millions of consumers still have vehicles containing the defective Takata airbags from the first several rounds of recalls. Now, Ford Motor Co. has discovered that there is a defect in how the new Takata airbags are installed.

The initial recall included cars manufactured by Honda, Toyota, Chrysler, Ford, Nissan, Mazda, Mitsubishi, and BMW. The sheer size of the recall required the NHSTA to take over coordination of the recall in order to prioritize which regions of the country got the replacement parts first.

Altria, née Philip Morris, is probably looking at a big dip in sales following a voluntary recall of some of its smokeless tobacco products after consumers found sharp metal objects in some cans. Although the company insists no users were injured from the foreign metal objects, the recall includes products from some of the corporation's most recognizable brands: Skoal and Copenhagen.

Here's what you need to know:

Drinkers of craft beer, take note: Sierra Nevada has issued a recall for the Midwest, East Coast, and the South on many of their popular 12-oz bottled beers. Fortunately, the recall is focused on a rather short production window, and the bottles and packaging are made in such a way that spotting a recalled Sierra Nevada is rather simple. So far, there have been no reported injuries.

Basically, there is a defect in the way one of their bottling plants was bottling their beverages. The defect could cause a little bit of the top to break off into the beer, exposing drinkers to potentially drinking broken glass, as well as flat beer.

When it comes to child safety, parents tend to pull out all the stops ... or maybe parents are the ones actually putting in all the stops. Regardless, a recent study about baby teething toys, or chew toys, which are not regulated in the same category as baby bottles, has shown that "BPA-free" may not actually really mean BPA-free. The study showed that not only did toys labeled as "non-toxic" contain toxic chemicals, but a majority of toys labeled as "BPA-free" actually contained BPA.

The study was designed to look at whether baby teething toys contained EDCs (endocrine disruptor chemicals), BPA, and other toxic chemicals. EDCs are harmful chemicals that can affect a person's development in many ways. Because all the harmful links between BPA, EDCs, and other toxins remain unknown, some researchers suggest avoiding as many as possible.

The past 365 days haven't been great for many reasons, a laundry list of lost artists and athletes and a nasty presidential election being just a few of them. But it wasn't a great year for food and drug companies, either. The past 12 months have been riddled with recalls, from E. coli-tainted burritos to non-dissolving antidepressants.

Here are the top five health scares of 2016:

A major household brand name in small appliances, Cuisinart, issued a voluntary recall this week that affects approximately 8 million of the company's food processor units. The recall applies to all units sold between 1996 and 2015 that have the four-rivet blade. Consumers have been warned to stop using the four-rivet blades immediately due to concerns that the product can cause injury.

The company issued the recall after it had received nearly 70 reports of consumers finding broken pieces of the food processor's blade in their food. Shockingly, a little less than half of these reports included individuals discovering the broken pieces of blade in their mouths. These types of blades break down over time and can break apart, leaving small fragments of metal blade in food.

Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, for the grandson of a Bellingham, Washington couple, he won’t be getting a 12V Ride-On Tonka Dump Truck this Christmas. While bringing home the large popular toy in the back of a pick-up truck, it spontaneously caught fire on the way back from Toys R Us, twice!

Delmond Harden purchased the dump truck from Toy R Us and was bringing it home in the back of his pick-up truck when he noticed the toy was on fire in the back. He pulled over, put out the fire, and immediately started to head back to the store to return the toy truck. However, en route back to the store, the truck caught fire again. This time however, the flames would not be contained as easily as before. The toy truck caused Harden’s real pick-up truck to catch fire, sending flames nearly 20 feet high in the sky, requiring the fire department, and a road closure. Toys R Us has pulled the toy truck from their stores while they wait for investigators to figure out the cause of the fire.