CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal Documents Blog

CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog


Several famous authors filed a brief with the Supreme Court, asking it to hear a lawsuit over Google digital book library. Malcolm Gladwell, Margaret Atwood, Yann Martel, Steven Sondheim and others lent their names to the brief, contending Google is guilty of "massive copyright infringement.

The Supreme Court has yet to decide whether it will hear an appeal from the Second Circuit Court's decision, but you can read the authors' arguments in their filing below:

A United Nations panel has issued an opinion declaring that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been 'arbitrarily detained' by the governments of Sweden and the United Kingdom for the past five years. The Human Rights Council's Working Group on Arbitrary Detention recommended Assange's release, along with possible financial compensation, and you can read their full opinion below.

Assange has been accused of rape in Sweden, and was arrested by the UK in 2010. He has remained in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012, fearing extradition to the United States for revealing classified information via WikiLeaks.

It doesn't quite have the same ring as Jaime Lannister's 'Kingslayer,' but William Merideth's moniker is just as well-earned. Last July, the self-described 'Drone Slayer' took his Benelli M1 Super 90 shotgun to a neighbor's drone and did indeed slay it. And now that neighbor is suing Merideth in federal court.

So who controls the airspace above your property? And can you shoot down your neighbor's drone? We might find out soon.

Conservative politicians and voters have long questioned Barack Obama's eligibility for the presidency, claiming the two-term president was born outside the United States. (He was born in Hawaii.) Now the tables seem to have turned for GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

A Houston, Texas lawyer has filed a lawsuit in federal court, challenging Cruz's status as a "natural born citizen" as required by the Constitution. Can the court disqualify Cruz from the presidential race? Let's take a look at the complaint:

How does the saying go? "It takes a wolf to catch a wolf." And it appears that the wolf who ran Silk Road was caught by a couple law enforcement wolves who were pocketing bitcoin during their investigation.

Ross Ulbricht was convicted of seven criminal charges in his operation of the underground website, ranging from hacking to drug trafficking, and was sentenced to life in prison. He is appealing both his conviction and sentence based on two federal agents pleading guilty to corrupt misconduct during his investigation. You can read his full appeal below:

How much is a trip to the toilet worth? What about a coffee run or a smoke break? To one penny-pinching Pennsylvania publishing company, it could be a not-so-cool $1.75M or more. According to a judge's order, American Future Systems Inc. (doing business as Progressive Business Publications) will have to compensate some 6,000 employees it forced to clock out before going to the bathroom or taking other short breaks.

A full list of Progressive's transgressions, and the court's response, are found in the memorandum below:

Notorious pharmaceutical price manipulator Martin Shkreli and co-conspiring corporate attorney Even Greebel were arrested in New York this morning on federal securities fraud charges.

Shkreli gained worldwide infamy when his current pharmaceutical company jacked up the prices of life-saving AIDS medication by some 5,000 percent. The grand jury indictment, which you can read below, accuses Shkreli of using a former company he owned as a personal piggy bank to repay debts from other business ventures.

"Labels matter." That's what the California Supreme Court said when reinstituting a class action lawsuit regarding the accuracy of organic labels on food products. The court also said: "Misrepresentations in labeling undermine this signifying function, preventing consumers from correctly identifying the goods and services that carry the attributes they desire while also hampering honest producers' attempts to differentiate their merchandise from the competition."

The ruling allows consumers to bring unfair competition lawsuits in state court if manufacturers or sellers misuse the "organic" designation on food or produce. You can read the full decision below.

This is why we can't have sweet things. Sugar is delicious, but it can kill you. High fructose corn syrup may also be deadly. And the two sweeteners have been locked in a sour legal battle over naming rights and advertising.

Can corn syrup call itself "corn sugar?" Is it "natural?" Do we care? Can you just put it into a 64-ounce soda and give it to me, please? You can see sugar's complaint below.

The push and pull of gun control laws and the Second Amendment continued regarding firearm restrictions passed in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. New York and Connecticut passed stricter gun laws in 2013, and a federal court upheld some of those restrictions while invalidating others.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that bans of semiautomatic assault rifles and large-capacity magazines can stand, while striking down provisions against the non-semiautomatic Remington 7615 and limits on gun owners loading more than seven bullets in a clip. You can read the court's opinion in full below: