CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal Documents Blog

CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog


Along with ten other women, Summer Zervos accused Donald Trump of sexual assault following the recent release of a recording of Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. Trump fired back against Zervos and others, calling the allegations a "total fabrication," and even mocking his accusers' physical appearance.

Zervos, a former contestant on Trump's reality TV show "The Apprentice," has now filed a defamation lawsuit against the future president, claiming his denials of her story as a "hoax" and dismissal of her as a "phony" caused her emotional distress and lost business. You can read her claims in full below:

Most people know that if your drive drunk you can get your license suspended. But many aren't aware that suspensions aren't limited to driver's licenses. And a new law in New Jersey mandates that if a train engineer loses their driver's license because of a DUI, they will also be suspended from operating trains.

But two Jersey unions are pushing back on the law, claiming federal statutes governing rail workers already consider DUI offenses and the new law is overly punitive.

Last June, Omar Mateen entered Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida and opened fire, killing 49 people and wounding another 53. During a 911 call, Mateen swore allegiance to the Islamic State (also referred to as ISIS or ISIL) and told officers he was motivated by the Iraq War and the U.S.'s campaign against ISIS.

This week, some of the victims' families filed a federal lawsuit against Twitter, Google, and Facebook, claiming the social media and tech giants "profit from ISIS postings through advertising revenue." You can see the full complaint below.

Fortunately for all involved, Edgar M. Welch surrendered to police before anyone was injured. Still, the man who took it upon himself to find out whether a popular Washington D.C. pizza restaurant was a front for a child sex slavery ring committed very real and very dangerous crimes even if the basis of his investigation was fake news.

In the criminal complaint, filed in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and included below, you can see the crimes Welch is charged with, along with an account of his arrest and what he told officers regarding his motives.

A letter from the Federal Election Commission to Donald Trump's presidential campaign cited over 1,000 donations that may have violated various campaign finance laws, totaling around $1.3 million in campaign funds. The letter, which you can read in full below, alleges Trump accepted donations from unregistered political groups and that individual donations exceeded legal limits.

According to CNN, these letters aren't uncommon, and Barack Obama and Bernie Sanders both received similar notices in the past.

This past summer, the city of Chicago passed new regulations on home-sharing and short-term rental companies like Airbnb, adding a new four percent licensing fee to fund enforcement and homeless services, along with a complaint hotline. The new rules also require those who lease their houses or apartments by the night to pay share data on their listings with the city to ensure compliance with the law.

But a new lawsuit claims those rules "imposed draconian and unintelligible restrictions on home-sharing that hurt communities, violate constitutional rights, and punish responsible homeowners." You can see the full complaint below:

Lost in the outrage over widespread fraud at Wells Fargo is the adverse impact the bank's pressure to open new accounts had on their employees. Just last week, the New York Times published stories from former bankers who were under so much stress to sell unneeded services that they suffered from anxiety, had panic attacks, and even became addicted to drinking hand sanitizer.

But a recent class action lawsuit details the unreasonable expectations Wells Fargo had of their employees, and the retaliation those employees faced if they failed to meet strict sales quotas. And some of those former employees are seeking $2.6 billion from the disgraced bank.

Donald Trump is a litigious individual, and his legal team is fond of the cease and desist letter threatening legal action. So it's no surprise that Trump's attorneys sent the New York Times a Demand for Retraction letter in response to an article entitled "Two Women Say Donald Trump Touched Them Inappropriately."

These letters haven't always been the most convincing. So it's also no surprise that the Times responded, and in no uncertain terms. As for Trump's demand that the paper remove the article from its website and issue an apology, counsel for the Times replied, "We decline to do so." You can read the entire response, and some choice quotes, below.

In recent weeks, 2016 presidential candidate Donald Trump's charity, the Donald J. Trump Foundation, has come under increased scrutiny for not being very charitable. Now, the New York Attorney General says the Foundation isn't listed as a charity at all, and must stop fundraising in the Empire State.

According to AG Eric Schneiderman's office, the Trump Foundation failed to register with the state Charities Bureau and therefore illegally solicited contributions. In a Notice of Violation, the AG's office ordered the Foundation to "immediately cease soliciting contributions or engaging in any other fundraising activities in New York." You can read the full letter below:

Before the next big show hits your TV screens, it's shopped to advertisers in "upfronts," lavish previews featuring network stars and musical numbers, hosted at venues like Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. And long before a single episode of that show hits the airwaves, a whole team goes to work on its scenery and backdrops. Who puts on these extravagant unveilings? Who do the networks call to design the latest sets and reality TV backgrounds? Turns out, it's a much messier process than the Hollywood polish would lead you to believe.

An entertainment industry party planning company is suing former employees and their side businesses, claiming they siphoned off millions in profit that should've gone to the company itself. Not only that, but party planners claim the illegal enterprise went on so long it amounted to racketeering, and now they're looking for $200 million in damages.