CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal Documents Blog

CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog


Both Indiana and now Arkansas are the center of a nationwide debate about Religious Freedom Restoration Acts (RFRAs). Critics of the recently passed legislation say the laws will allow businesses to refuse service to gay, lesbian, and transgender customers under the protection of religious freedom.

Indiana's Gov. Mike Pence signed that state's RFRA into law last week, and the Arkansas State House passed their own version yesterday. With all of the controversy surrounding the laws, let's take a look at the actual text of each, and see how they compare to each other, and federal religious freedom legislation.

The verdict is in on the Ellen Pao discrimination case. Sort of. Earlier this afternoon, a San Francisco jury returned verdicts in favor of defendant Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers on three of four counts.

On the fourth count, the jury failed to reach the required nine votes out of 12, but the judge sent them back to deliberate further.

What happened to "no man left behind"? Does it only apply to our soldiers and not our foreign allies?

Nine Iraqi men, who risked their lives alongside American soldiers, are living in fear in Iraq after the United States allegedly failed to honor its promise. The men, identified by code names, worked as interpreters for U.S. forces in Iraq and were promised visas to come to the United States. Despite completing all required paperwork and interviews, the men have waited over two years and still have not received their visas.

So now, they are suing the U.S. Department of State. for a resolution on their Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) applications, NPR reports.

Tennessee's law capping "pain and suffering" damages is unconstitutional, a state judge has ruled.

Donald and Beverly Clark filed a lawsuit against Aimee Cain and AT&T for damages due to a car crash. The couple asked for $22.5 million in damages for pain and suffering, far exceeding the state's cap for non-economic damages. AT&T filed a motion for partial summary judgment requesting that damages be limited to the $750,000 cap.

Hamilton County Circuit Court Judge W. Neil Thomas denied the motion and ruled the cap unconstitutional for violating the fundamental right to a trial by jury.

The Wikimedia Foundation has filed a federal lawsuit alleging the government agency's mass data collection violated the Constitution.

Wikipedia's parent company is heading a lawsuit against the National Security Agency (NSA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), among others, and contends the online encyclopedia was specifically targeted for surveillance.

Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International are also plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

The Department of Justice issued two reports Wednesday: one finding that police in Ferguson, Missouri, engaged in a pattern of conduct that routinely violated residents' civil rights, and another detailing the fatal police shooting of Ferguson resident Michael Brown.

Citing the results of the Michael Brown investigation, the DOJ declined to file federal civil rights charges against former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed Brown after an altercation in August.

Attorney General Eric Holder said the investigations revealed "a community that was deeply polarized, and where deep distrust and hostility often characterized interactions between police and area residents."

The first person in the United States to contract Ebola has filed a lawsuit against the hospital where she was working when she contracted the disease. Nina Pham was working as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas last fall, when she and a coworker contracted the deadly disease.

On Monday, Pham filed a suit against the hospital's parent company, Texas Health Resources, claiming negligence, fraud, and invasion of privacy.

In an explanation that may have seemed self-evident, the U.S. Supreme Court has clarified that dumping undersized red grouper overboard in an attempt to deceive fish and game officials is not the same as shredding financial documents to mislead auditors, regulators, and shareholders.

The Court reversed a ruling from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that held the Sarbanes-Oxley Act's prohibition on destruction or concealment of "any record, document, or tangible object" applied to commercial fishermen who threw undersized fish back in the Gulf of Mexico after inspection by National Marine Fisheries officers.

Colorado's neighbors aren't the only ones upset about the Centennial State's marijuana legalization laws. A Washington, D.C.-based anti-drug group is suing several Colorado defendants in U.S. District Court, claiming the defendants' plans to sell marijuana under state legalization laws constitutes a violation of federal RICO statutes.

Safe Streets Alliance, along with the owners of a Holiday Inn in Frisco, Colorado, are alleging that defendants' plans to open a pot shop next door to the hotel constitutes racketeering.

The National Association of the Deaf filed two federal class actions complaints today. The suits -- against Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) -- allege that the universities discriminate against the deaf because their online content is not captioned, or is poorly or illegibly captioned.

This lack of captioning, according to the plaintiffs, deprives the 48 million deaf or hard-of-hearing Americans of the same educational opportunities as those who can hear. It also violates federal law, the lawsuits assert.