CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog


Last month, Devin Kelley gunned down 26 people in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. At the time, we wondered whether the Air Force may be liable for the shooting, as it failed to report Kelley's court-martial for domestic violence to the National Criminal Information Center database, a conviction that would have barred him from purchasing the military-style rifle he used in the shooting.

This week, two families of victims slain in the shooting filed a lawsuit against the store that sold Kelley a Ruger AR-556, despite a "possibly disqualifying issue" tied to his permit to carry. The suit claims that, because he listed a Colorado address on his Firearms Transaction Record, "[t]he Ruger should have never been placed in Kelley's hands in Texas."

Kayla Cuevas' mother claims her daughter was "subjected to continuous and ongoing bullying" for years while a student in Brentwood, New York. The numerous incidents happened on school grounds in the Brentwood Union School District and were perpetrated by MS-13 gang members, Evelyn Rodriguez claims, with full knowledge of the school district.

Cuevas was killed, allegedly by MS-13 members, in September 2016, and Rodriguez is suing the school district, claiming it failed to stop the bullying and protect her daughter from gang violence. You can see the lawsuit below:

Just because a currency is digital doesn't mean it can't be taxed. And the Internal Revenue Service is looking for cryptocurrency buyers and sellers come tax time.

A federal court in California has ordered one virtual currency exchange, Coinbase, to hand over identifying records for almost 10,000 users who bought, sold, sent, or received more than $20,000 of digital currency through their accounts. And those users will likely need to pay taxes on those transactions. You can read the full order below:

Everything in moderation, including moderation. It's generally a good rule in life, as well as when it comes to imbibing alcohol. And one distillery thought they had some even better advice: drink our vodka, infused with "safe additives that provide protective effects."

There's just one problem -- the regulatory agencies in control of labeling weren't too keen on some of the statements included on the vodka bottles. So now the company is suing, claiming the agencies violated the company's First Amendment rights as well as their own internal policies.

There are many reasons a person would want to leave her home country and go to another. One of the most frightening is fleeing violence and persecution. Asylees, as they're known legally, are in a vulnerable position -- in transit to a destination they may be denied access to, with nowhere safe to return.

While not all requests for asylum are granted, there are specific policies and procedures to which governments must adhere when assessing asylum claims. But a new class action lawsuit claims that U.S. border patrol officials have been unlawfully denying immigrants the ability to even apply for asylum. Here's a look at the lawsuit:

The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has not been a friendly venue for President Donald Trump's executive order banning immigration to the U.S. from several Muslim-majority countries. As recently as last month, a federal judge in Ninth Circuit blocked the administration's third attempt at re-issuing the travel ban.

But Trump won a partial victory in the Ninth this week, when judges split Trump's Travel Ban 3.0, allowing enforcement of some, but not all of its provisions. So what's in and what's out? You can check out the ruling for yourself below:

Medical care is only as good as the people who provide it. And if there aren't enough trained medical professionals, the level of health care a hospital provides can only be so good.

lawsuit filed by nurses against a Michigan hospital claims staff shortages were so bad at the facility that patients faced delays in medication and basic hygienic care and nurses were forced to work in dangerous conditions. You can read the allegations in the full lawsuit below.

Claiming that heavy metal from an MRI drug is leading to a debilitating illness, Chuck Norris and his wife Gena are suing seven pharmaceutical and medical diagnostic companies and their subsidiaries for failing to warn Gena or her healthcare providers of the risks of gadolinium. Gadolinium Deposition Disease (GDD) occurs when patients who have been injected with gadolinium-based contrast agents for help in MRI readings later develop persistent symptoms like headaches, bone and joint pain, and clouded mental activity.

The Norrises are seeking over $10 million from McKesson Corporation, Bracco Diagnostics, and others. You can read their full lawsuit below.

In August, President Donald Trump pardoned former 'America's Toughest Sheriff' Joe Arpaio following his conviction for criminal contempt. Arpaio had "willfully violated" a court order barring he and his staff from racial profiling and other forms of unconstitutional policing.

But yesterday, a federal judge in Arizona ruled that, while Trump's pardon of Arpaio may have spared him from corporeal punishment, it doesn't warrant vacating his underlying conviction. You can see the judge's ruling below:

Muhammad Ali passed away in June 2016, eight months before Super Bowl LI kicked off in February 2017. But Ali still left his mark on the big game, appearing in a three-minute promotional ad for Fox before the game, an ad that, according to a $30 million lawsuit against the broadcaster, "uses Ali to define greatness and ultimately to compare the NFL legends to Ali and thus to define them and the Super Bowl as 'greatness' too."

The only problem with that ad? Fox didn't clear it first with Muhammad Ali Enterprises LLC, which owns Ali's trademark rights, copyrights, right of publicity, and all other intellectual property rights. Hence the lawsuit, which you can see below: