CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog


In August, President Donald Trump pardoned former 'America's Toughest Sheriff' Joe Arpaio following his conviction for criminal contempt. Arpaio had "willfully violated" a court order barring he and his staff from racial profiling and other forms of unconstitutional policing.

But yesterday, a federal judge in Arizona ruled that, while Trump's pardon of Arpaio may have spared him from corporeal punishment, it doesn't warrant vacating his underlying conviction. You can see the judge's ruling below:

Muhammad Ali passed away in June 2016, eight months before Super Bowl LI kicked off in February 2017. But Ali still left his mark on the big game, appearing in a three-minute promotional ad for Fox before the game, an ad that, according to a $30 million lawsuit against the broadcaster, "uses Ali to define greatness and ultimately to compare the NFL legends to Ali and thus to define them and the Super Bowl as 'greatness' too."

The only problem with that ad? Fox didn't clear it first with Muhammad Ali Enterprises LLC, which owns Ali's trademark rights, copyrights, right of publicity, and all other intellectual property rights. Hence the lawsuit, which you can see below:

We all scream for ice cream, that's just a fact. And we also all scream when we're inundated with spam calls and text messages from companies, so much so that we passed a law against it. The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) banning automated or prerecorded calls without consent. But according to a new class action lawsuit, Baskin-Robbins, one of the nation's largest purveyors of frozen treats has been flooding customers with text message ads, in violation of the TCPA.

You can see the full lawsuit below:

The State of California, along with Maine, Maryland, and Minnesota, has filed a federal lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security following the Trump administration's announcement that it would rescind former President Barack Obama's executive order regarding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The program had provided limited legal protection for individuals brought to the country illegally as minors.

California is claiming that Trump's efforts to cancel DACA protections are "illegal and seriously harm States' interests in ways that have already started to materialize and that threaten to last for generations." You can read the full lawsuit below:

On the heels of Chicago's lawsuit last week, and San Francisco's lawsuit over the weekend, the State of California has filed a lawsuit against U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions regarding President Donald Trump's executive order threatening to without federal grants from "sanctuary jurisdictions."

The lawsuit claims the threat represents and unconstitutional takeover of state and local law enforcement, and also violates the Constitution's Spending Clause, and is seeking an injunction against the Department of Justice, barring it from enforcing the executive order. You can read the lawsuit in full, below:

Way back in 2011, Benchmark Capital was one of Uber's early and prominent investors. And according to court filings, Benchmark currently holds approximately 13 percent of Uber's stock, equating to 20 percent of Uber's voting power. Unfortunately for Uber and its deposed CEO Travis Kalanick, that court filing is a fraud lawsuit, filed by Benchmark in Delaware state court yesterday.

The lawsuit involves that voting power, centering on Kalanick's alleged misrepresentations in stacking Uber's board of directors in order to solidify his position, possibly with an eye on a return to the company. You can see the full lawsuit below.

Via his favored mode of communication and proclamation, President Donald Trump last month tweeted that "the United States Government will not accept or allow ... Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military." While there was some disagreement whether the tweets could be interpreted or implemented as official military policy, the announcement angered many in both the LGBTQ and military community.

It also angered LGBTQ individuals already in the military. Today five transgender members of the U.S. military sued Trump, claiming the tweets violate the due process and equal protection rights of transgender service members, and asking for an injunction against the ban. You can read the full lawsuit below.

True to his campaign promises, President Donald Trump signed an executive order in January threatening to without federal grants from "sanctuary jurisdictions." Such cities and states, which limit cooperation with the federal government in immigration matters, would be ineligible for certain federal funds unless they agreed to abide by immigration orders and enforcement. But by April a federal judge in California had enjoined the feds from enforcing the order, and upheld that injunction last month, even after Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memo intended to clarify the order.

Now, the City of Chicago is suing Sessions over the sanctuary cities order, calling it "unauthorized and unconstitutional," and claiming that enforcing the order would "fly in the face of longstanding City policy that promotes cooperation between local law enforcement and immigrant communities, ensures access to essential city services for all residents, and makes all Chicagoans safer." You can see the full lawsuit below.

For years we've been noting state after state decriminalizing and legalizing marijuana, from cannabinoids for medical use only to recreational use, all with one big caveat: marijuana remains an illegal Schedule I narcotic under the federal Controlled Substances Act. This had a huge impact on state legalization efforts, from cultivation and transportation across state lines to canna-businesses getting bank accounts.

But that might all be changing. New Jersey Senator Cory Booker today introduced the Marijuana Justice Act of 2017, which would remove weed from the schedule of controlled substances and do a whole lot more. What else is in the bill? See for yourself below.

In a case of saying much without saying a lot, the Supreme Court again compromised on President Donald Trump's travel ban. This time, a one-paragraph order left in place a Hawaii judge's ruling permitting entry of "grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins of persons in the United States."

At the same time, the Court granted the administration's request to stay part of the decision that would have made it easier for more refugees to enter the country. The Court's ruling is less than 50 words, but you can read the full decision on which it is based below: