CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog

February 2016 Archives

The U.S. Department of Justice has sued Ferguson, Missouri, claiming the city "engages in an ongoing pattern or practice of conduct, including discrimination, that deprives persons of rights, privileges and immunities secured and protected by the United States Constitution and federal law." The lawsuit is the result of Ferguson trying to back out of an agreement between the city and the DOJ to implement suggested reforms to correct unconstitutional practices on the part of the city's police force and municipal court system.

"The residents of Ferguson have waited nearly a year for their city to adopt an agreement that would protect their rights and keep them safe," said Attorney General Loretta Lynch. "They have waited decades for justice. They should not be forced to wait any longer."

Several famous authors filed a brief with the Supreme Court, asking it to hear a lawsuit over Google digital book library. Malcolm Gladwell, Margaret Atwood, Yann Martel, Steven Sondheim and others lent their names to the brief, contending Google is guilty of "massive copyright infringement.

The Supreme Court has yet to decide whether it will hear an appeal from the Second Circuit Court's decision, but you can read the authors' arguments in their filing below:

A United Nations panel has issued an opinion declaring that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been 'arbitrarily detained' by the governments of Sweden and the United Kingdom for the past five years. The Human Rights Council's Working Group on Arbitrary Detention recommended Assange's release, along with possible financial compensation, and you can read their full opinion below.

Assange has been accused of rape in Sweden, and was arrested by the UK in 2010. He has remained in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012, fearing extradition to the United States for revealing classified information via WikiLeaks.