CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog

January 2017 Archives

The average citizen might not be too familiar with the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, but we're guessing that weird word will become more commonplace in American diction in the near future. Legally speaking, an emolument is a payment, advantage, or profit gained from a person's possession of elected office. And the reason for its recent prominence in headlines is the new possessor of the highest office in the land.

As many began pointing out long before he was elected, President Donald Trump could run into more than a few ethical dilemmas while in office, not the least of which are foreign governments making payments to his many hotels and businesses. Now the first lawsuit has been filed alleging the new president is violating the Constitution by allowing his businesses to accept these payments, and you can see the list of allegations below:

Along with ten other women, Summer Zervos accused Donald Trump of sexual assault following the recent release of a recording of Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. Trump fired back against Zervos and others, calling the allegations a "total fabrication," and even mocking his accusers' physical appearance.

Zervos, a former contestant on Trump's reality TV show "The Apprentice," has now filed a defamation lawsuit against the future president, claiming his denials of her story as a "hoax" and dismissal of her as a "phony" caused her emotional distress and lost business. You can read her claims in full below:

Most people know that if your drive drunk you can get your license suspended. But many aren't aware that suspensions aren't limited to driver's licenses. And a new law in New Jersey mandates that if a train engineer loses their driver's license because of a DUI, they will also be suspended from operating trains.

But two Jersey unions are pushing back on the law, claiming federal statutes governing rail workers already consider DUI offenses and the new law is overly punitive.