CourtSide - The FindLaw Breaking Legal News Blog

December 2017 Archives

Last month, Devin Kelley gunned down 26 people in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. At the time, we wondered whether the Air Force may be liable for the shooting, as it failed to report Kelley's court-martial for domestic violence to the National Criminal Information Center database, a conviction that would have barred him from purchasing the military-style rifle he used in the shooting.

This week, two families of victims slain in the shooting filed a lawsuit against the store that sold Kelley a Ruger AR-556, despite a "possibly disqualifying issue" tied to his permit to carry. The suit claims that, because he listed a Colorado address on his Firearms Transaction Record, "[t]he Ruger should have never been placed in Kelley's hands in Texas."

Kayla Cuevas' mother claims her daughter was "subjected to continuous and ongoing bullying" for years while a student in Brentwood, New York. The numerous incidents happened on school grounds in the Brentwood Union School District and were perpetrated by MS-13 gang members, Evelyn Rodriguez claims, with full knowledge of the school district.

Cuevas was killed, allegedly by MS-13 members, in September 2016, and Rodriguez is suing the school district, claiming it failed to stop the bullying and protect her daughter from gang violence. You can see the lawsuit below:

Just because a currency is digital doesn't mean it can't be taxed. And the Internal Revenue Service is looking for cryptocurrency buyers and sellers come tax time.

A federal court in California has ordered one virtual currency exchange, Coinbase, to hand over identifying records for almost 10,000 users who bought, sold, sent, or received more than $20,000 of digital currency through their accounts. And those users will likely need to pay taxes on those transactions. You can read the full order below: