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A judge in Maine has reversed a temporary in-home quarantine order for a nurse who treated Ebola victims in West Africa. The judge's new order, issued Friday, removes many of the restrictions initially placed on the nurse's movement.

Judge Charles C. LaVerdiere had issued a temporary order Thursday, requiring nurse Kaci Hickox to submit to in-home monitoring and be subject to restrictions on her movement. The order was in response to a petition filed by the state, reports the Portland Press Herald.

Hickox had refused to abide by the state's request that she voluntarily restrict her movements, and even went out for a bike ride Thursday. So far, Hickox has tested negative for the Ebola virus and has not shown any symptoms of potential infection.

A group of Chinese high rollers is accusing the FBI of posing as Internet repairmen in order to secretly infiltrate and search their Las Vegas villa.

As part of a motion to suppress evidence filed in federal criminal court on Tuesday, the men accused of running an illegal gambling operation out of their hotel assert that FBI agents illegally snuck in to investigate. The document warns that the next time your Internet or phone service goes out, it could actually be an elaborate plot by federal agents trying to gain access to your home.

Can FBI agents legally do this sort of alleged "repairmen" ploy?

Arizona gays and lesbians can get married now pursuant to a letter by Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne.

The letter, issued early Friday, instructs the Grand Canyon State's 15 county clerks to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples immediately, following a recent decision by a federal district court that demanded Arizona stop enforcing its gay marriage ban. The Arizona Republic reports that Horne issued a statement Friday declaring that an appeal on the issue would be "an exercise in futility" and a waste of taxpayer money.

So what is the legal effect of A.G. Tom Horne's letter for gay marriage in Arizona?

Idaho and Nevada's gay marriage bans were struck down as unconstitutional on Tuesday by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

A three-judge panel of the federal appellate court found that both states' laws were in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of equal protection under the law. In their majority opinion, the judges also found that each state had failed to meet the level of scrutiny applied to laws which discriminate against gays and lesbians.

What does this ruling mean for states in the 9th Circuit?

A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Monday that will prevent police in Ferguson, Missouri, from enforcing a "keep moving" rule on protesters.

This unofficial rule, also known as the "five second rule," has been used to keep protesters in Ferguson from standing still for too long. Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU of Missouri, believes that this practice has been applied "haphazardly" and tended to increase tension among protesters, reports MSNBC. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Perry found these rules to be unconstitutional, as they infringed on protesters' constitutional rights.

What was Judge Perry's reasoning behind finding the "keep moving" rule unconstitutional?

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear five gay marriage appeals, along with hundreds of other cases.

In an 81-page Order List issued Monday, the High Court detailed a slew of cases that it would hear in its 2014 Term (which began today), but gay marriage cases from five states were not among them.

Because same-sex marriage appeals from Utah, Indiana, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, and Virginia were rejected, the rulings striking down those states' gay marriage bans are now in effect. So what happens next?

A Louisiana state court ruled Monday that the state's gay marriage ban was unconstitutional. That opinion was originally sealed because the case involved the adoption of a minor child, but the ruling was released to the public Tuesday.

Judge Edward Rubin, writing for the 15th Judicial District Court in Lafayette Parish, ruled that a lesbian couple who had been legally married in California should be considered legally married in Louisiana. The decision was based on the law's violations of the guarantees of equal protection and due process under the 14th Amendment, as well as conflicts with the Full Faith and Credit Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

This ruling could mean big changes in the gay marriage landscape for Louisiana residents.

An Arizona man may receive his dead husband's benefits after a federal court ruled that his spouse's death certificate could be changed to reflect their same-sex married status.

Fred McQuire, 69, lost his partner George Martinez after 45 years, after the two got married in California this summer, reports The Arizona Republic. Arizona's ban on same-sex marriage prevented McQuire from getting his deceased husband's Social Security and veteran's benefits, but on Friday a federal judge ruled in McQuire's favor.

A federal appeals court has upheld lower court decisions that struck down gay marriage bans in Indiana and Wisconsin.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals roundly rejected arguments that same-sex marriage bans were somehow beneficial to children and ruled that neither state had provided a rational basis for their laws, thus making them unconstitutional.

In a decision issued Wednesday, a federal judge upheld Louisiana's ban on gay marriage.

This ruling in Robicheaux v. Caldwell was based on U.S. District Court Judge Martin L. C. Feldman's evaluation that Louisiana's law was supported by rational basis. The decision is the first in more than a year to disrupt a long chain of federal courts which have ruled against state gay marriage bans. According to The Associated Press, more than 20 courts have ruled in favor of gay marriage since the U.S. Supreme Court's decision invalidating a portion of the Defense of Marriage Act in 2013.

So why was this case different?