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Last week jurors in the Boston Marathon Bombing sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death. The jurors had already found Tsarnaev guilty of the bombing itself, and had been weighing both mitigating and aggravating factors presented by his attorneys and prosecutors during the penalty phase of his trial.

Although it took just 14 hours for the jury to decide Tsarnaev deserved the death penalty, many had speculated whether the jury might decide on life in imprison instead. Now the speculation is over, and you can see exactly what the jury was thinking. The verdict form that the jury filled out when sentencing Tsarnaev is below, so you can see for yourself what evidence they found convincing and which factors led to their decision.

The Department of Justice issued two reports Wednesday: one finding that police in Ferguson, Missouri, engaged in a pattern of conduct that routinely violated residents' civil rights, and another detailing the fatal police shooting of Ferguson resident Michael Brown.

Citing the results of the Michael Brown investigation, the DOJ declined to file federal civil rights charges against former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed Brown after an altercation in August.

Attorney General Eric Holder said the investigations revealed "a community that was deeply polarized, and where deep distrust and hostility often characterized interactions between police and area residents."

Jodi Arias' 'Secret Testimony' Transcripts Released

Transcripts of convicted murderer Jody Arias' closed-door testimony during her sentencing retrial have been released.

Arias was convicted of murdering her boyfriend in 2013, but a jury was unable to decide whether she should be sentenced to death or life in prison. A new jury was impaneled in September to decide Arias' fate, but controversy arose after the judge closed the courtroom to the press and the public for the testimony of an unidentified witness, reports The Arizona Republic.

That witness was later identified as Arias herself.

This has been quite a year for breaking legal stories; 2014 has produced some shocking court decisions, grand jury hearings, celebrity deaths, and shady settlements.

Here are the 10 most-viewed breaking legal documents from FindLaw's Courtside blog in 2014:

Actor and comedian Bill Cosby is being accused in a new lawsuit of assaulting a 15-year-old girl in the Playboy Mansion four decades ago.

In a civil suit filed in a California state court on Tuesday, Judy Huth claims that in 1974, Cosby gave her alcohol and convinced her to lie about her age to gain entry to the Playboy Mansion. Once inside, Huth alleges that Cosby sexually molested her and caused her "psychological damage and mental anguish."

Is it possible for Huth to recover legally from something that happened 40 years ago?

Transcripts of the Ferguson grand jury hearings have been released to the public following the announcement that Darren Wilson would not be indicted on any criminal charges for the shooting death of Michael Brown.

This is somewhat unusual, as grand jury proceedings are typically held in secret, and when no indictment is reached, the public isn't privy to what testimony was heard. However, as CNN reports, St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch agreed to release thousands of pages that were the basis of the grand jury's decision not to indict Wilson for Brown's killing.

Part of that record is the grand jury testimony of Darren Wilson, contained in the document below.

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was indicted Thursday for allegedly conspiring to violate mine safety laws. The charges come after a grand jury investigation into the Upper Big Branch mine explosion which killed 29 miners in 2010.

Massey Energy owned the Upper Big Branch mine near Montcoal, West Virginia. According to NPR, prosecutors have accused Blakenship of lying to federal regulators about the safety of the mine and its workers. If convicted of the charges contained in Thursday's indictment, the ex-CEO could face up to 31 years in prison.

What does the 43-page indictment assert about Blankenship's involvement in the Upper Big Branch mine disaster and the 29 miners' deaths?

Accused cop killer Eric Frein now faces two terrorism charges on accompanying allegations that he killed a Pennsylvania state trooper as part of a "revolution."

Prosecutors added these new criminal charges Thursday, joining several other charges relating to the shooting death of one police officer and the severe wounding of another by Frein. NBC News reports that the terror allegations arose after investigators uncovered a suspicious letter on Frein's hard drive; the letter allegedly stated that "only passing through the crucible for another revolution can get us back to the liberties we once had."

How does this letter and other allegations explain the charges against Frein?

A group of Chinese high rollers is accusing the FBI of posing as Internet repairmen in order to secretly infiltrate and search their Las Vegas villa.

As part of a motion to suppress evidence filed in federal criminal court on Tuesday, the men accused of running an illegal gambling operation out of their hotel assert that FBI agents illegally snuck in to investigate. The document warns that the next time your Internet or phone service goes out, it could actually be an elaborate plot by federal agents trying to gain access to your home.

Can FBI agents legally do this sort of alleged "repairmen" ploy?

DA Wants Adrian Peterson Rearrested After Alleged 'Weed' Comment

Prosecutors in NFL running back Adrian Peterson's Texas child abuse case have filed a motion to have his bond set aside in the case and have Peterson rearrested after Peterson allegedly admitted to smoking marijuana.

Peterson was arrested on charges of felony child abuse last month after allegedly disciplining his 4-year-old son with a wooden "switch." Following his arrest, Peterson posted $15,000 bond and was released.

But now prosecutors want a judge to set aside Peterson's bond in light of comments he allegedly made while undergoing mandatory drug testing earlier this week.