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Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was indicted Thursday for allegedly conspiring to violate mine safety laws. The charges come after a grand jury investigation into the Upper Big Branch mine explosion which killed 29 miners in 2010.

Massey Energy owned the Upper Big Branch mine near Montcoal, West Virginia. According to NPR, prosecutors have accused Blakenship of lying to federal regulators about the safety of the mine and its workers. If convicted of the charges contained in Thursday's indictment, the ex-CEO could face up to 31 years in prison.

What does the 43-page indictment assert about Blankenship's involvement in the Upper Big Branch mine disaster and the 29 miners' deaths?

Accused cop killer Eric Frein now faces two terrorism charges on accompanying allegations that he killed a Pennsylvania state trooper as part of a "revolution."

Prosecutors added these new criminal charges Thursday, joining several other charges relating to the shooting death of one police officer and the severe wounding of another by Frein. NBC News reports that the terror allegations arose after investigators uncovered a suspicious letter on Frein's hard drive; the letter allegedly stated that "only passing through the crucible for another revolution can get us back to the liberties we once had."

How does this letter and other allegations explain the charges against Frein?

A group of Chinese high rollers is accusing the FBI of posing as Internet repairmen in order to secretly infiltrate and search their Las Vegas villa.

As part of a motion to suppress evidence filed in federal criminal court on Tuesday, the men accused of running an illegal gambling operation out of their hotel assert that FBI agents illegally snuck in to investigate. The document warns that the next time your Internet or phone service goes out, it could actually be an elaborate plot by federal agents trying to gain access to your home.

Can FBI agents legally do this sort of alleged "repairmen" ploy?

Prosecutors in NFL running back Adrian Peterson's Texas child abuse case have filed a motion to have his bond set aside in the case and have Peterson rearrested after Peterson allegedly admitted to smoking marijuana.

Peterson was arrested on charges of felony child abuse last month after allegedly disciplining his 4-year-old son with a wooden "switch." Following his arrest, Peterson posted $15,000 bond and was released.

But now prosecutors want a judge to set aside Peterson's bond in light of comments he allegedly made while undergoing mandatory drug testing earlier this week.

A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Monday that will prevent police in Ferguson, Missouri, from enforcing a "keep moving" rule on protesters.

This unofficial rule, also known as the "five second rule," has been used to keep protesters in Ferguson from standing still for too long. Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU of Missouri, believes that this practice has been applied "haphazardly" and tended to increase tension among protesters, reports MSNBC. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Perry found these rules to be unconstitutional, as they infringed on protesters' constitutional rights.

What was Judge Perry's reasoning behind finding the "keep moving" rule unconstitutional?

Prosecutors in Adrian Peterson's alleged child abuse case have filed a petition to protect the NFL player's 4-year-old son.

The Child in Need of Protection or Services (CHIPS) petition, filed in child protection court on Friday, summarizes the abuse allegations against the Vikings player and details a plan for keeping his son safe. According to Minneapolis-St. Paul's KMSP-TV, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman stated that the petition is required by state law whenever serious child abuse allegations exist for a child living in the county.

What does the petition request for Adrian Peterson and his son?

Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer is the latest NFL player to be arrested on domestic violence charges. He was arrested by Phoenix police Wednesday on charges of aggravated assault against his wife and 17-month-old son.

Dwyer's arrest comes after Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was indicted over the weekend on child abuse charges, and less than a month since video footage of Ravens running back Ray Rice punching his wife in an elevator earlier this year made headlines.

After filing a lawsuit over access to public records, the ACLU of Missouri has received a "heavily redacted" copy of the incident report on the August 9 shooting of Michael Brown.

This five-page document, released by the Ferguson Police Department, reveals few details about the events of the fatal shooting and lacks even a basic narrative. Tony Rothert, the Missouri ACLU's legal director, called on the Ferguson Police Department to release a complete copy of the incident report to "begin building public trust."

Police in Ferguson, Missouri, have released an incident report from prior to Michael Brown's shooting, one that details an alleged robbery that preceded the unarmed teen's killing by police.

Ferguson police identified the officer who shot and killed Brown as Officer Darren Wilson. The incident report claims that Brown had stolen a box of cigars prior to being lethally shot.

According to The Washington Post, the report does not "provide any additional information regarding the confrontation or why Brown was ultimately shot and killed."

A federal appeals court has released a secret Justice Department memo that justifies a 2011 drone attack that killed Anwar al Awlaki, an American-born Islamist preacher and suspected al Qaeda leader.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals released a redacted version of the secret Obama administration memorandum on Monday. The memo (which starts on page 67 after the opinion) states that since the U.S. government considered al Awlaki to be an "operational leader" of an "enemy force," it was legal for the Central Intelligence Agency to attack him with a drone even though he was a U.S. citizen.

The memo says the killing was further justified under Congressional authorization for the use of U.S. military force following the Sept. 11, 2001 hijacked-plane attacks.

The Obama administration released the memo in response to a court order following Freedom of Information lawsuits filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and The New York Times.

"High-level government officials have concluded, on the basis of al-Aulaqi's activities in Yemen, that al-Aulaqi is a leader of (Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula) whose activities in Yemen pose a 'continued an imminent threat' of violence to United states persons and interests," the document said.

Awlaki was killed in what U.S. officials acknowledged at the time was a CIA drone strike in Yemen on September 30, 2011, Reuters reports. Another American citizen, Samir Khan, was killed in the same attack, although U.S. officials have said that Khan was not intentionally targeted.