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Prosecutors in NFL running back Adrian Peterson's Texas child abuse case have filed a motion to have his bond set aside in the case and have Peterson rearrested after Peterson allegedly admitted to smoking marijuana.

Peterson was arrested on charges of felony child abuse last month after allegedly disciplining his 4-year-old son with a wooden "switch." Following his arrest, Peterson posted $15,000 bond and was released.

But now prosecutors want a judge to set aside Peterson's bond in light of comments he allegedly made while undergoing mandatory drug testing earlier this week.

A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Monday that will prevent police in Ferguson, Missouri, from enforcing a "keep moving" rule on protesters.

This unofficial rule, also known as the "five second rule," has been used to keep protesters in Ferguson from standing still for too long. Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU of Missouri, believes that this practice has been applied "haphazardly" and tended to increase tension among protesters, reports MSNBC. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Perry found these rules to be unconstitutional, as they infringed on protesters' constitutional rights.

What was Judge Perry's reasoning behind finding the "keep moving" rule unconstitutional?

Prosecutors in Adrian Peterson's alleged child abuse case have filed a petition to protect the NFL player's 4-year-old son.

The Child in Need of Protection or Services (CHIPS) petition, filed in child protection court on Friday, summarizes the abuse allegations against the Vikings player and details a plan for keeping his son safe. According to Minneapolis-St. Paul's KMSP-TV, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman stated that the petition is required by state law whenever serious child abuse allegations exist for a child living in the county.

What does the petition request for Adrian Peterson and his son?

Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer is the latest NFL player to be arrested on domestic violence charges. He was arrested by Phoenix police Wednesday on charges of aggravated assault against his wife and 17-month-old son.

Dwyer's arrest comes after Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was indicted over the weekend on child abuse charges, and less than a month since video footage of Ravens running back Ray Rice punching his wife in an elevator earlier this year made headlines.

After filing a lawsuit over access to public records, the ACLU of Missouri has received a "heavily redacted" copy of the incident report on the August 9 shooting of Michael Brown.

This five-page document, released by the Ferguson Police Department, reveals few details about the events of the fatal shooting and lacks even a basic narrative. Tony Rothert, the Missouri ACLU's legal director, called on the Ferguson Police Department to release a complete copy of the incident report to "begin building public trust."

Police in Ferguson, Missouri, have released an incident report from prior to Michael Brown's shooting, one that details an alleged robbery that preceded the unarmed teen's killing by police.

Ferguson police identified the officer who shot and killed Brown as Officer Darren Wilson. The incident report claims that Brown had stolen a box of cigars prior to being lethally shot.

According to The Washington Post, the report does not "provide any additional information regarding the confrontation or why Brown was ultimately shot and killed."

A federal appeals court has released a secret Justice Department memo that justifies a 2011 drone attack that killed Anwar al Awlaki, an American-born Islamist preacher and suspected al Qaeda leader.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals released a redacted version of the secret Obama administration memorandum on Monday. The memo (which starts on page 67 after the opinion) states that since the U.S. government considered al Awlaki to be an "operational leader" of an "enemy force," it was legal for the Central Intelligence Agency to attack him with a drone even though he was a U.S. citizen.

The memo says the killing was further justified under Congressional authorization for the use of U.S. military force following the Sept. 11, 2001 hijacked-plane attacks.

The Obama administration released the memo in response to a court order following Freedom of Information lawsuits filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and The New York Times.

"High-level government officials have concluded, on the basis of al-Aulaqi's activities in Yemen, that al-Aulaqi is a leader of (Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula) whose activities in Yemen pose a 'continued an imminent threat' of violence to United states persons and interests," the document said.

Awlaki was killed in what U.S. officials acknowledged at the time was a CIA drone strike in Yemen on September 30, 2011, Reuters reports. Another American citizen, Samir Khan, was killed in the same attack, although U.S. officials have said that Khan was not intentionally targeted.

Miami police are investigating a woman's report that she blacked out after drinking and smoking marijuana with San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick and two other NFL players.

The police report (attached below) does not allege any crimes but police say they are investigating the case as a "suspicions incident."

"There are no charges, definitely not. There is an investigation," Miami Police Department office Rene Pimentel told USA Today.

A woman (whose name is redacted from the report) said that on April 1 she visited Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Ricardo Lockette, 27, at a Miami apartment.

She said Kaepernick, 26, and 49ers wide receiver Quinton Patton, 23, were also at the apartment. She also said she had been in a "sexual relationship with Mr. Kaepernick in the past," according to the police report.

'Upskirt' Photos are Not Illegal, Mass. High Court Rules

It is not illegal to secretly photograph underneath a person’s clothing (known as “upskirting”), Massachusetts’ highest court has ruled in privacy decision that may prompt lawmakers to update state law.

The state’s highest court ruled (see decision below) that a man who took cellphone photos up the skirts of women on the Boston subway did not violate state law because the women were neither nude nor partially nude.

“A female passenger on a MBTA trolley who is wearing a skirt, dress, or the like covering these parts of her body is not a person who is ‘partially nude,’ no matter what is or is not underneath the skirt by way of underwear or other clothing,” wrote Justice Margot Botsford of the state Supreme Judicial Court.

The high court overruled a lower court decision that upheld charges against Michael Robertson, who was arrested in August 2010 by transit police who set up a sting after getting reports that he was using his cellphone to take photos and video up female riders’ skirts and dresses.

Robertson had argued that it was his constitutional right to take the photos. Existing so-called Peeping Tom laws in Massachusettsprotect people from being photographed in dressing rooms and bathrooms when nude or partially nude. But the law does not protect clothed people in public areas, the court said.

At least one prosecutor has urged state lawmakers to act.

“Every person, male or female, has a right to privacy beneath his or her own clothing,” Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel Conley said in a statement Wednesday. “If the statute as written doesn’t protect that privacy, then I’m urging the Legislature to act rapidly and adjust it so it does.”

A reputed captain of New York's Bonanno organized crime family has been charged with the infamous "Goodfellas" Lufthansa heist at JFK airport in 1978.

The indictment (attached below) reads like a mafia hit list and charges Vincent Asaro, 78, with participating in the $6 million Lufthansa heist. It also charges Asaro's son Jerome and three other alleged Bonanno family associates with murder, robbery, extortion, arson and bookmaking.

The single-biggest robbery in U.S. history at the time, the Lufthansa heist was dramatized in the Martin Scorsese film "Goodfellas." The holdup took place on Dec. 11, 1978, after untraceable cash was flown in from West Germany and stashed in a JFK vault.

The crime stumped investigators for more than 30 years, but a break in the case came last summer when human remains were found buried at the former home James "Jimmy the Gent" Burke.

Burke was the suspected mastermind behind the Lufthansa heist and the inspiration for the character played by Robert DeNiro in "Goodfellas." Burke went on a killing spree after the holdup to eliminate anyone who might tie him to the case. He died in prison in 1996 while serving time for an unrelated case.

The indictment also charges Vincent Asaro with the 1969 murder of Paul Katz, whose remains were found last June at a home still owned by Burke's family.

Burke owned Robert's Lounge, the bar that the late Henry Hill described as Burke's private cemetery. "Jimmy buried over a dozen bodies ... under the bocce courts," Hill wrote in his book, "A Goodfella's Guide to New York."