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Most of us are skeptical when buying a used car -- we want the CARFAX report and we don't always believe salesmen's assurances that a car on their lot is safe. But the "Certified Pre-Owned" distinction is meant to allay those fears -- after all, the CARFAX website itself calls them "the low-cost alternative to a new car, or as a low-risk option to a used car." But it turns out CPOs might not be as safe as you'd think.

A federal lawsuit alleges the Federal Trade Commission allowed dealers to market and advertise certified pre-owned vehicles as "safe," even when the same vehicles were subject to safety recalls due to dangerous defects. The suit covers cars, trucks, motorcycles, and motor homes, and claims the FTC did not require dealers to submit the vehicles to the recalls or fix the defects; they only had to disclose the vehicles "may" be subject to recalls, even when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration had already required a safety recall. You can read the full lawsuit below.

U.S. District Judge James Robart issued a nationwide injunction blocking enforcement of President Donald Trump's recent executive order that banned citizens from seven predominantly Muslim nations from traveling to the United States. Robart, appointed to the Western District of Washington by Geroge W. Bush, ruled in favor of Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who sued over the order last week.

Robart ruled that Washington State had standing to bring the case forward. In his oral ruling, he declared that Washington provided evidence that Trump's order has immediate harm and that the lawsuit against the order has substantial likelihood of succeeding in challenging the constitutionality of the order.

Robart will be issuing a final written ruling. In the meantime, you can see Ferguson's proposed temporary restraining order below.

Last June, Omar Mateen entered Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida and opened fire, killing 49 people and wounding another 53. During a 911 call, Mateen swore allegiance to the Islamic State (also referred to as ISIS or ISIL) and told officers he was motivated by the Iraq War and the U.S.'s campaign against ISIS.

This week, some of the victims' families filed a federal lawsuit against Twitter, Google, and Facebook, claiming the social media and tech giants "profit from ISIS postings through advertising revenue." You can see the full complaint below.

The legal relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico has always been a little complicated. And perhaps nowhere has that status been more on display than the issue of same-sex marriage.

On Tuesday, the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico ruled that the Supreme Court's decision in Obergefell v. Hodges that found same-sex couples have the fundamental right to marry does not apply to the island commonwealth. You can see the judge's reasoning in the full opinion below:

It doesn't quite have the same ring as Jaime Lannister's 'Kingslayer,' but William Merideth's moniker is just as well-earned. Last July, the self-described 'Drone Slayer' took his Benelli M1 Super 90 shotgun to a neighbor's drone and did indeed slay it. And now that neighbor is suing Merideth in federal court.

So who controls the airspace above your property? And can you shoot down your neighbor's drone? We might find out soon.

Conservative politicians and voters have long questioned Barack Obama's eligibility for the presidency, claiming the two-term president was born outside the United States. (He was born in Hawaii.) Now the tables seem to have turned for GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

A Houston, Texas lawyer has filed a lawsuit in federal court, challenging Cruz's status as a "natural born citizen" as required by the Constitution. Can the court disqualify Cruz from the presidential race? Let's take a look at the complaint:

Notorious pharmaceutical price manipulator Martin Shkreli and co-conspiring corporate attorney Even Greebel were arrested in New York this morning on federal securities fraud charges.

Shkreli gained worldwide infamy when his current pharmaceutical company jacked up the prices of life-saving AIDS medication by some 5,000 percent. The grand jury indictment, which you can read below, accuses Shkreli of using a former company he owned as a personal piggy bank to repay debts from other business ventures.

The push and pull of gun control laws and the Second Amendment continued regarding firearm restrictions passed in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. New York and Connecticut passed stricter gun laws in 2013, and a federal court upheld some of those restrictions while invalidating others.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that bans of semiautomatic assault rifles and large-capacity magazines can stand, while striking down provisions against the non-semiautomatic Remington 7615 and limits on gun owners loading more than seven bullets in a clip. You can read the court's opinion in full below:

N.Y. Politician Sheldon Silver Indicted on 5 Counts of Corruption

New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver has been indicted on five criminal counts involving millions of dollars in alleged bribes and kickbacks.

The criminal complaint filed Wednesday in federal court accuses Silver, 70, of receiving more than $6 million from two law firms since 2002 through various schemes, reports the New York Daily News. The money allegedly includes more than $3 million in referral fees for directing clients involved in asbestos litigation to one of the law firms.

According to prosecutors, Silver directed state funds to a doctor doing asbestos research in exchange for referrals from this doctor of asbestos cases to the law firm.

Supreme Court: To Rescind Mortgage, a Letter Can Suffice

The Supreme Court ruled today that homeowners can back out of mortgages by writing a letter to the lender.

The unanimous ruling was in favor of Larry and Cheryle Jesinoski, a Minnesota couple who sued Countrywide Home Loans, Reuters reports. Countrywide, now owned by Bank of America, had refused to rescind the couple's $611,000 mortgage, claiming that the Jesinoskis were required to file a lawsuit in order to rescind the mortgage, which they had failed to do by the statutory deadline.