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Soon after his election as president, Donald Trump attempted to crack down on speech coming out of federal agencies, especially speech on social media that might be critical of the new administration or supportive of the previous one. That attempt backfired somewhat, with federal employees going "rogue" and creating alternate social media accounts used to blast Trump policy changes.

In response, the Trump administration furthered its attempt to silence disparaging speech, issuing a federal summons to Twitter in an effort to unmask the users behind at least one rogue account. Twitter didn't blink, and countersued the Department of Homeland Security, along with several other individuals and agencies.

Less than 24 hours later, Trump's team withdrew its summons and Twitter followed suit, dropping its complaint challenging the administration's power to demand such information. You can read Twitter's filing below.

The average citizen might not be too familiar with the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, but we're guessing that weird word will become more commonplace in American diction in the near future. Legally speaking, an emolument is a payment, advantage, or profit gained from a person's possession of elected office. And the reason for its recent prominence in headlines is the new possessor of the highest office in the land.

As many began pointing out long before he was elected, President Donald Trump could run into more than a few ethical dilemmas while in office, not the least of which are foreign governments making payments to his many hotels and businesses. Now the first lawsuit has been filed alleging the new president is violating the Constitution by allowing his businesses to accept these payments, and you can see the list of allegations below:

A letter from the Federal Election Commission to Donald Trump's presidential campaign cited over 1,000 donations that may have violated various campaign finance laws, totaling around $1.3 million in campaign funds. The letter, which you can read in full below, alleges Trump accepted donations from unregistered political groups and that individual donations exceeded legal limits.

According to CNN, these letters aren't uncommon, and Barack Obama and Bernie Sanders both received similar notices in the past.

In recent weeks, 2016 presidential candidate Donald Trump's charity, the Donald J. Trump Foundation, has come under increased scrutiny for not being very charitable. Now, the New York Attorney General says the Foundation isn't listed as a charity at all, and must stop fundraising in the Empire State.

According to AG Eric Schneiderman's office, the Trump Foundation failed to register with the state Charities Bureau and therefore illegally solicited contributions. In a Notice of Violation, the AG's office ordered the Foundation to "immediately cease soliciting contributions or engaging in any other fundraising activities in New York." You can read the full letter below:

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a resolution this week declaring pornography a "public health hazard" and calling for more "education, prevention, research, and policy change ... to address the pornography epidemic that is harming the people of our state and nation." The non-binding resolution is a laundry list of harms allegedly created by the production and consumption of pornography, all of which have led to a "public health crisis."

But if the Utah resolution doesn't ban pornography, or even earmark state funds to combat it, what does it actually do? You can check it out below:

San Francisco has been battling a public urination problem for decades. The city tried increasing the fines for peeing in public. It tried mobile solar-powered toilets. It even tried urine-repellant paint that makes the piss splash back on the pisser. Now the City by the Bay is being sued for its latest effort to curb public urination: a public urinal.

Referred to as a pissoir in the lawsuit, and more accurately described as “a three-inch hole in the center of a three-foot diameter concrete base” in Mission Dolores Park, the urinal has drawn the ire of a local church organization and a conservative legal institute labeled as hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, as well as a comedic response from the City Attorney’s Office. So yeah, this should be fun.

The New York Attorney General's fraud lawsuit against Donald Trump's now defunct investment "university" can proceed, according to a state appeals court. The suit, originally filed in 2013 and included below, alleges Trump University used "deceptive and unlawful practices" to fleece prospective students of some $40 million.

The New York Supreme Court has already ruled that Trump University violated state law by operating an unlicensed educational institution. Now a jury will decide whether Trump and other school operators fraudulently induced residents to buy increasingly expensive seminars to be "the next DONALD TRUMP."

Conservative politicians and voters have long questioned Barack Obama's eligibility for the presidency, claiming the two-term president was born outside the United States. (He was born in Hawaii.) Now the tables seem to have turned for GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

A Houston, Texas lawyer has filed a lawsuit in federal court, challenging Cruz's status as a "natural born citizen" as required by the Constitution. Can the court disqualify Cruz from the presidential race? Let's take a look at the complaint:

Largest Auto Safety Fine in U.S. History: Honda to Pay $70M

Honda has agreed to pay a $70 million fine for failing to properly disclose more than 1,700 reports of deaths, injuries, and other incidents to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as required by federal law.

The fine is the largest auto safety fine in U.S. history, reports The Detroit News. The unreported incidents date back as far as 2003, and include eight reports of injuries or death involving the Takata airbag inflators that have led the carmaker to recall more than 9 million vehicles since 2008.

What led to this record-setting fine against Honda?

FindLaw's Top 10 Breaking Legal Documents of 2014

This has been quite a year for breaking legal stories; 2014 has produced some shocking court decisions, grand jury hearings, celebrity deaths, and shady settlements.

Here are the 10 most-viewed breaking legal documents from FindLaw's Courtside blog in 2014: