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In recent weeks, 2016 presidential candidate Donald Trump's charity, the Donald J. Trump Foundation, has come under increased scrutiny for not being very charitable. Now, the New York Attorney General says the Foundation isn't listed as a charity at all, and must stop fundraising in the Empire State.

According to AG Eric Schneiderman's office, the Trump Foundation failed to register with the state Charities Bureau and therefore illegally solicited contributions. In a Notice of Violation, the AG's office ordered the Foundation to "immediately cease soliciting contributions or engaging in any other fundraising activities in New York." You can read the full letter below:

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a resolution this week declaring pornography a "public health hazard" and calling for more "education, prevention, research, and policy change ... to address the pornography epidemic that is harming the people of our state and nation." The non-binding resolution is a laundry list of harms allegedly created by the production and consumption of pornography, all of which have led to a "public health crisis."

But if the Utah resolution doesn't ban pornography, or even earmark state funds to combat it, what does it actually do? You can check it out below:

San Francisco has been battling a public urination problem for decades. The city tried increasing the fines for peeing in public. It tried mobile solar-powered toilets. It even tried urine-repellant paint that makes the piss splash back on the pisser. Now the City by the Bay is being sued for its latest effort to curb public urination: a public urinal.

Referred to as a pissoir in the lawsuit, and more accurately described as “a three-inch hole in the center of a three-foot diameter concrete base” in Mission Dolores Park, the urinal has drawn the ire of a local church organization and a conservative legal institute labeled as hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, as well as a comedic response from the City Attorney’s Office. So yeah, this should be fun.

The New York Attorney General's fraud lawsuit against Donald Trump's now defunct investment "university" can proceed, according to a state appeals court. The suit, originally filed in 2013 and included below, alleges Trump University used "deceptive and unlawful practices" to fleece prospective students of some $40 million.

The New York Supreme Court has already ruled that Trump University violated state law by operating an unlicensed educational institution. Now a jury will decide whether Trump and other school operators fraudulently induced residents to buy increasingly expensive seminars to be "the next DONALD TRUMP."

Conservative politicians and voters have long questioned Barack Obama's eligibility for the presidency, claiming the two-term president was born outside the United States. (He was born in Hawaii.) Now the tables seem to have turned for GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

A Houston, Texas lawyer has filed a lawsuit in federal court, challenging Cruz's status as a "natural born citizen" as required by the Constitution. Can the court disqualify Cruz from the presidential race? Let's take a look at the complaint:

Largest Auto Safety Fine in U.S. History: Honda to Pay $70M

Honda has agreed to pay a $70 million fine for failing to properly disclose more than 1,700 reports of deaths, injuries, and other incidents to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as required by federal law.

The fine is the largest auto safety fine in U.S. history, reports The Detroit News. The unreported incidents date back as far as 2003, and include eight reports of injuries or death involving the Takata airbag inflators that have led the carmaker to recall more than 9 million vehicles since 2008.

What led to this record-setting fine against Honda?

FindLaw's Top 10 Breaking Legal Documents of 2014

This has been quite a year for breaking legal stories; 2014 has produced some shocking court decisions, grand jury hearings, celebrity deaths, and shady settlements.

Here are the 10 most-viewed breaking legal documents from FindLaw's Courtside blog in 2014:

Okla., Neb. Sue Colo. Over Marijuana Law

Oklahoma and Nebraska are suing Colorado over its legalization of marijuana, and the U.S. Supreme Court gets to be the first court to hear it.

The complaint filed Thursday claims that under Colorado's new marijuana scheme, the state has created "a dangerous gap in the federal drug control system" and has allowed the drug to flow into neighboring states. According to The New York Times, law enforcement on the borders of Colorado have complained that marijuana arrests are stretching jail budgets too thin.

What is the legal argument against Colorado's law and why is this issue before the Supreme Court?

Los Angeles, San Francisco Sue Uber Over Business Practices

The district attorneys of Los Angeles and San Francisco have filed suit against Uber, accusing the ride-sharing company of unlawful business practices.

Among the allegations are that Uber charged customers a misleading "Safe Rides Fee" without providing real background checks on drivers. Uber is also being called to task on "Airport Fee Tolls," charged to UberX customers who traveled to San Francisco International Airport.

What does this suit mean for Californians who use Uber?

Portland, Ore., Sues Uber, Orders Drivers to Cease and Desist

The city of Portland, Oregon, filed suit against Uber in state court on Monday, ordering the ride-share company to cease operations until it complies with Portland's laws.

In a press release Monday, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) announced its lawsuit, noting that it would ask the court to verify whether Uber was subject to and in violation of Portland's transportation rules and regulations. Commissioner Steve Novick, who oversees PBOT, announced the city is prepared to issue civil and criminal penalties against Uber and its drivers for operating without permits and inspections.

What's Portland's beef with Uber?