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One inevitable outcome to manufacturing driverless cars is that there will nonetheless be lawsuits if and when those cars get into accidents. And if there's no "driver" to sue, those lawsuits will be undoubtedly be aimed at the manufacturer.

One driverless car manufacturer is trying to avoid liability for several accidents, essentially arguing "to err is human." Tesla says that no manufacturer has been expected to build a perfectly accident-free automobile, especially in the face of human error, nor should it be expected to design a car, even a driverless one, that can overcome those human errors. You can see their full legal filing below:

Along with ten other women, Summer Zervos accused Donald Trump of sexual assault following the recent release of a recording of Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. Trump fired back against Zervos and others, calling the allegations a "total fabrication," and even mocking his accusers' physical appearance.

Zervos, a former contestant on Trump's reality TV show "The Apprentice," has now filed a defamation lawsuit against the future president, claiming his denials of her story as a "hoax" and dismissal of her as a "phony" caused her emotional distress and lost business. You can read her claims in full below:

An anonymous, alleged sexual abuse victim of Dennis Hastert filed a breach of contract lawsuit last week, claiming the former House Speaker still owes him $1.8 million of $3.5 million Hastert agreed to pay to "compensate for and keep confidential" the abuse. It was the previous $1.7 million in payments that put Hastert on the FBI's radar, and he has already pled guilty to structuring bank withdrawals to avoid bank reporting requirements.

You can read the full lawsuit below:

The first person in the United States to contract Ebola has filed a lawsuit against the hospital where she was working when she contracted the disease. Nina Pham was working as a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas last fall, when she and a coworker contracted the deadly disease.

On Monday, Pham filed a suit against the hospital's parent company, Texas Health Resources, claiming negligence, fraud, and invasion of privacy.

FindLaw's Top 10 Breaking Legal Documents of 2014

This has been quite a year for breaking legal stories; 2014 has produced some shocking court decisions, grand jury hearings, celebrity deaths, and shady settlements.

Here are the 10 most-viewed breaking legal documents from FindLaw's Courtside blog in 2014:

Sandy Hook Lawsuit Says Gun Maker, Distributors Liable for Deaths

Victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting are suing a gun manufacturer and its distributors for those killed and injured in the tragedy.

According to Slate, at least nine families and one teacher have joined the lawsuit filed Monday, which will attempt to hold Bushmaster, the manufacturer of the XM15-E2S semi-automatic rifle used to kill 26 at Sandy Hook, legally responsible. The suit also names dozens of other companies believed to have been involved in distributing or selling the particular rifle used in the Sandy Hook massacre.

Critics worry that this Sandy Hook suit won't get off the ground, but what are the obstacles in its path?

Bill Cosby Assaulted Girl, 15, in Playboy Mansion, Lawsuit Claims

Actor and comedian Bill Cosby is being accused in a new lawsuit of assaulting a 15-year-old girl in the Playboy Mansion four decades ago.

In a civil suit filed in a California state court on Tuesday, Judy Huth claims that in 1974, Cosby gave her alcohol and convinced her to lie about her age to gain entry to the Playboy Mansion. Once inside, Huth alleges that Cosby sexually molested her and caused her "psychological damage and mental anguish."

Is it possible for Huth to recover legally from something that happened 40 years ago?

A delayed General Motors recall that led to at least 13 deaths was caused by "a pattern of incompetence and neglect" throughout the company, an internal report released Thursday said.

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra announced that 15 employees -- many of them senior legal and engineering executives -- have been dismissed and five more have been disciplined after the probe by former federal prosecutor Anton Valukas.

Valukas' report, described by Barra as "brutally tough and deeply troubling," is attached below.

Barra has confirmed that GM will soon begin compensating victims of crashes linked to the faulty ignition switches that have plagued the company for over a decade, The Associated Press reports. The program is expected to begin taking claims August 1 of this year.

GM officials said that the number of fatalities related to the part defect may rise. Reuters reports that at least 74 people have died in crashes similar to those GM has linked to the faulty switches, based on an analysis of government data.

Miami Dolphins lineman Jonathan Martin was indeed subjected to racial slurs and vicious sexual taunts about his mother and sister by Richie Incognito and two other teammates, according to the long-awaited report released by prominent attorney Ted Wells' on Friday.

Incognito was the ringleader of three players who orchestrated "a pattern of harassment" not only on Martin, but also another unidentified young offensive lineman and a member of the team's athletic training staff. Be warned: Wells' 150-page report (attached below) contains some extremely vulgar language.

The harassment by Incognito and fellow offensive linemen John Jerry and Mike Pouncey contributed to Martin's departure from the team in October, according to Ted Wells' 150-page report (attached in full below).

"The Report finds that the assistant trainer repeatedly was the object of racial slurs and other racially derogatory language; that the other offensive lineman was subjected to homophobic name-calling and improper physical touching; and that Martin was taunted on a persistent basis with sexually explicit remarks about his sister and his mother and at times ridiculed with racial insults and other offensive comments," Ted Wells states in his summary.

Wells says his inquiry found Martin was taunted and ridiculed almost daily. After Martin left the team in October, Incognito boasted about "breaking Jmart" in a notebook the linemen used to tally fines and bonuses among themselves. When the investigation began, Incognito asked another player to destroy the book, but investigators obtained it.

"As all must surely recognize, the NFL is not an ordinary workplace," the report states. "Professional football is a rough, contact sport played by men of exceptional size, speed, strength and athleticism. But even the largest, strongest and fleetest person may be driven to despair by bullying, taunting and constant insults."

The screenwriter who found Philip Seymour Hoffman dead of a drug overdose denied a supermarket tabloid's claim that he and Hoffman were lovers and has filed suit for $50 million.

The National Enquirer ran a cover story claiming that playwright David Bar Katz was Hoffman's "gay lover." On Wednesday Katz filed a civil suit in New York seeking $5 million in damages and another $45 million in punitive damages.

Katz's lawsuit (attached below) calls the story "a complete fabrication."

"There was no interview," Katz's lawyer claims in the 5-page complaint. "Bar Katz and Hoffman were never lovers. Bar Katz did not see Hoffman freebasing cocaine the night before he died or at any other time. Bar Katz never saw Hoffman use heroin or cocaine."

The suit calls the Enquirer article "one of the most reprehensible examples of yellow journalism" ever.

The National Enquirer has yet to respond to the lawsuit.