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Last year, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to regulate internet service providers the same as any common carrier of utility services, opening up companies like Comcast and Time Warner to regulation similar to water and electric providers. Today, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld that notion, an enormous victory for the Obama administration and net neutrality advocates.

The ruling also preserves federal regulations prohibiting companies from either blocking or slowing of internet traffic to consumers or speeding up websites that agree to pay a fee for faster access. Here's a look at the ruling:

A federal judge has barred members of the U.S. women's national soccer team from striking or being locked out in the lead-up to this summer's Olympics. Women's team members have been clashing with the U.S. Soccer Federation over fair wages and an expired collective bargaining agreement (CBA).

In finding that certain clauses of that CBA were still in effect, Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman of the U.S. District Court in Illinois "barred the players from authorizing, encouraging, or engaging in any strike, work stoppage, slowdown or other concerted interference with the activities of the Federation." Here's a look at the full opinion and order.

In response to requests from The Washington Post, the federal judge in a class action lawsuit against Donald Trump's Trump University ordered several documents in the case to be unsealed, and then tried to claw some of those documents back from public view. At issue were the university's "playbooks," or guides for salespeople on how to aggressively market Trump's real estate and investment training courses.

So what do these documents reveal, and what is their current status? You can see the judge's full order here.

It may be the world's oldest profession, but that doesn't make it protected under the Constitution. A federal judge in California ruled that there is no fundamental right to prostitution, dismissing a lawsuit that challenged the state's ban exchanging sex for money.

The state claimed that "there is no fundamental right to engage in prostitution or to solicit prostitution" and "any relationship between the prostitute and the client is not expressive association protected by the Constitution," and U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White agreed. You can see his full order dismissing the case here:

The legal relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico has always been a little complicated. And perhaps nowhere has that status been more on display than the issue of same-sex marriage.

On Tuesday, the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico ruled that the Supreme Court's decision in Obergefell v. Hodges that found same-sex couples have the fundamental right to marry does not apply to the island commonwealth. You can see the judge's reasoning in the full opinion below:

Conservative politicians and voters have long questioned Barack Obama's eligibility for the presidency, claiming the two-term president was born outside the United States. (He was born in Hawaii.) Now the tables seem to have turned for GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

A Houston, Texas lawyer has filed a lawsuit in federal court, challenging Cruz's status as a "natural born citizen" as required by the Constitution. Can the court disqualify Cruz from the presidential race? Let's take a look at the complaint:

This is why we can't have sweet things. Sugar is delicious, but it can kill you. High fructose corn syrup may also be deadly. And the two sweeteners have been locked in a sour legal battle over naming rights and advertising.

Can corn syrup call itself "corn sugar?" Is it "natural?" Do we care? Can you just put it into a 64-ounce soda and give it to me, please? You can see sugar's complaint below.

Moments ago in Zurich, FIFA officials voted to retain controversial president Sepp Blatter. Three days ago, nine high-ranking FIFA officials (including the man many thought would succeed Blatter) were arrested along with five media company executives on a wide range of corruption charges that rocked soccer's governing body.

The charges are detailed in an extensive Department of Justice indictment filed in the Eastern District of New York. You can read all 160 pages listing racketeering, bribery, and wire fraud below. Here are some highlights:

Last week jurors in the Boston Marathon Bombing sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death. The jurors had already found Tsarnaev guilty of the bombing itself, and had been weighing both mitigating and aggravating factors presented by his attorneys and prosecutors during the penalty phase of his trial.

Although it took just 14 hours for the jury to decide Tsarnaev deserved the death penalty, many had speculated whether the jury might decide on life in imprison instead. Now the speculation is over, and you can see exactly what the jury was thinking. The verdict form that the jury filled out when sentencing Tsarnaev is below, so you can see for yourself what evidence they found convincing and which factors led to their decision.

Colorado's neighbors aren't the only ones upset about the Centennial State's marijuana legalization laws. A Washington, D.C.-based anti-drug group is suing several Colorado defendants in U.S. District Court, claiming the defendants' plans to sell marijuana under state legalization laws constitutes a violation of federal RICO statutes.

Safe Streets Alliance, along with the owners of a Holiday Inn in Frisco, Colorado, are alleging that defendants' plans to open a pot shop next door to the hotel constitutes racketeering.