DC Circuit - The FindLaw DC Circuit Court of Appeals Opinion Summaries Blog

June 2014 Archives

The District of Columbia, like other tourist-destination cities like New York and New Orleans, has professional requirements for tour guides to operate tours in the city, according to The Associated Press. Last week, the D.C. Court of Appeals struck down the requirements as unconstitutional, for violating the First Amendment, reports The Wall Street Journal.

So, basically, now tour guides can say whatever they want -- with no way to determine whether information is accurate.

The past few weeks have been busy for cases originating in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari in three cases, two of them related, and issued a decision today. The two related cases involve the interpretation of the Administrative Procedure Act, the third case granted cert. involves the delegation doctrine, while the High Court decision issued today interprets the Clean Air Act.

For details on these cases, read on.

Plaintiff-appellant Larry Klayman found a page on Facebook three years ago entitled "Third Palestinian Intifada." The page "called for Muslims to rise up and kill the Jewish people." Klayman contacted Facebook to remove the page, which it subsequently did, but apparently not quickly enough, reports Business Insurance.

Klayman sued Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg (collectively "Facebook") for intentional assault and negligent breach of a duty of care that allegedly, Facebook owed Klayman.

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The District of Columbia has some positions open for attorneys, so get your resumes ready. To start, the District of Columbia election for Attorney General has proven contentious with the public and politicians at odds about when the election should take place.

And in less controversial job hunting, the D.C. Court of Appeals has announced that the application period for the Criminal Justice Act Panel is now open.

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Today the District of Columbia Court of Appeals announced proposed changes to Circuit Rules 25, 26 and 32. These rules have been a long time coming, as they are designed to replace the requirements for Case Management / Electronic Case Files (CM/ECF) system, which were adopted by Administrative Order filed on May 15, 2009. The proposed rules would incorporate the CM/ECF requirements into existing Circuit Rules.

Here's a closer look at the changes.