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We were wondering when we'd hear more on the D.C. Circuit's NSA cell phone metadata case, especially after the Second Circuit allowed C-SPAN to livestream oral arguments in a parallel case earlier this month.

The answer? On November 4, unlike its sister circuit to the north, the D.C. Circuit will not be televising the revolution, reports Politico. Audio recordings are typically posted on the D.C. Circuit's website after oral arguments, however.

Here's a recap of the lower court's anti-NSA opinion and what's at stake in this case:

After years of fighting for their freedom in U.S. courts, Fadi al-Maqaleh and Amin al-Bakri, who had been detained at Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan for at least a decade, were repatriated to Yemen earlier this week.

The timing of the release was curious: not only is al-Bakri is suffering from leukemia, but both al-Maqaleh and al-Bakri were named parties seeking certiorari from the U.S. Supreme Court in an appeal of the D.C. Circuit's holding that the district court correctly determined that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction to review their habeas petitions. Though U.S. officials refused to comment on al-Bakri's condition, sources told The Washington Post that he was in "bad shape."

It was like the worst DMV visit ever. Except that Aaron Schnitzler wasn't trying to renew his drivers license; he was trying to renounce his U.S. citizenship. And instead of the DMV, he was going to the U.S. State Department. And instead of being a driver on the open road, he was a state prisoner in South Dakota.

Schnitzler wanted to renounce his U.S. citizenship "[f]or reasons we do not understand," the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals explains. OK, fine. So he wrote to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, but they replied that he had to talk to the State Department. Then he wrote to the State Department. But they said that, in order to renounce his citizenship, he had to appear before a diplomat or consular official at a U.S. embassy. He tried the Department of Justice. No dice. He then filed a lawsuit against all three of those departments, telling them he didn't want to be a U.S. citizen anymore.

Americans aren't too keen on mystery meat, and thankfully, the U.S.D.A. is backing us up on that. On the second go around, the D.C. Circuit upheld a country-of-origin labeling rule for meat products, finding that the rule did not compel meat producers to speak.

With only one option left, we'll have to wait and see if the plaintiff will seek redress from the U.S. Supreme Court. Until then, let's look at the legal backdrop.

Chalk up another "W" for Alan Gura, the Second Amendment Foundation, and concealed carry advocates everywhere.

Washington, D.C., is home of some of the nation's most stringent gun laws, including a handgun registration requirement and a complete ban on concealed or open carrying outside of one's home. Or at least it was: It may soon have a pretty lax carrying policy after the District's ban was struck down by a federal district court.

Of course, appeals will likely follow, and stays could be issued, but for now, D.C. police will not be charging nonresidents with violating carrying laws if they are legally allowed to carry in their home states. As for residents, as long as the handgun is registered in accordance with D.C. law, carrying is permissible. As always, felons, spouse-beaters, and other individuals prohibited from owning firearms need not apply.

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Sexual assault against women in the military is an unfortunate reality. As more and more women are speaking out, bringing the issue to national attention, so are more women trying to get legal remedies. Unfortunately, it's not as easy as one would think.

Twelve military women learned the hard way that sometimes justice is not served. Read on to learn more about their legal claims against the Secretary of Defense, and why those claims failed.

The District of Columbia, like other tourist-destination cities like New York and New Orleans, has professional requirements for tour guides to operate tours in the city, according to The Associated Press. Last week, the D.C. Court of Appeals struck down the requirements as unconstitutional, for violating the First Amendment, reports The Wall Street Journal.

So, basically, now tour guides can say whatever they want -- with no way to determine whether information is accurate.

The rallying cry for net neutrality is still gaining momentum, as the FCC announced this week that it is seeking public comment on a proposed set of net neutrality rules.

And, as the future of the Internet is up in the air, a district judge upholds a D.C. gun registration law. Read on to learn more.

As the country awaits the Supreme Court's decisions in Hobby Lobby and Conestoga regarding the Obamacare contraception mandates, related cases are making their way through circuit courts around the country.

While Hobby Lobby and Conestoga deal with secular, for-profit corporations and their ability to "exercise religion," another emerging trend in contraception mandate cases will likely be the next Obamacare case before the Court.

Doctors' Obamacare Lawsuit Dismissal Affirmed by D.C. Circuit

The D.C. Circuit has affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit brought by medical doctors challenging the constitutionality of the implementation of Obamacare.

In Association of American Physicians and Surgeons v. Sebelius, one of the arguments asserted by the plaintiffs was that Congress violated the Origination Clause of the U.S. Constitution when it enacted the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

The case had been dismissed by the D.C. District Court for lack of standing and failure to state a claim by the association. The doctors appealed that dismissal, but were unsuccessful.