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Sexual assault against women in the military is an unfortunate reality. As more and more women are speaking out, bringing the issue to national attention, so are more women trying to get legal remedies. Unfortunately, it's not as easy as one would think.

Twelve military women learned the hard way that sometimes justice is not served. Read on to learn more about their legal claims against the Secretary of Defense, and why those claims failed.

The District of Columbia, like other tourist-destination cities like New York and New Orleans, has professional requirements for tour guides to operate tours in the city, according to The Associated Press. Last week, the D.C. Court of Appeals struck down the requirements as unconstitutional, for violating the First Amendment, reports The Wall Street Journal.

So, basically, now tour guides can say whatever they want -- with no way to determine whether information is accurate.

The rallying cry for net neutrality is still gaining momentum, as the FCC announced this week that it is seeking public comment on a proposed set of net neutrality rules.

And, as the future of the Internet is up in the air, a district judge upholds a D.C. gun registration law. Read on to learn more.

As the country awaits the Supreme Court's decisions in Hobby Lobby and Conestoga regarding the Obamacare contraception mandates, related cases are making their way through circuit courts around the country.

While Hobby Lobby and Conestoga deal with secular, for-profit corporations and their ability to "exercise religion," another emerging trend in contraception mandate cases will likely be the next Obamacare case before the Court.

Doctors' Obamacare Lawsuit Dismissal Affirmed by D.C. Circuit

The D.C. Circuit has affirmed the dismissal of a lawsuit brought by medical doctors challenging the constitutionality of the implementation of Obamacare.

In Association of American Physicians and Surgeons v. Sebelius, one of the arguments asserted by the plaintiffs was that Congress violated the Origination Clause of the U.S. Constitution when it enacted the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

The case had been dismissed by the D.C. District Court for lack of standing and failure to state a claim by the association. The doctors appealed that dismissal, but were unsuccessful.

American Samoans Challenge Denial of U.S. Citizenship

Six American Samoans are getting a chance to challenge a federal law in the D.C. Circuit that labels them as U.S. nationals, but not citizens.

The D.C. District Court granted the government's motion to dismiss, but the D.C. Circuit has decided to give the American Samoans a chance to argue their case, according to the Pacific News Center.

According to the original opinion, the State Department classifies the country as an "unincorporated territory."

Judge Disses Think Tank's 'Imaginative' FOIA Request

A D.C. federal judge tossed out Competitive Enterprise Institute's (CEI) FOIA lawsuit against the EPA partially because it contained an "imaginative conspiracy theory."

In Competitive Enterprise Institute v. EPA, Judge James E. Boasberg of the U.S. District Court for D.C. found that CEI was using weak (albeit creative) arguments to compel the EPA to release about a thousand withheld emails.

So what made Judge Boasberg declare CEI's arguments to be an "imaginative conspiracy theory?"

Obamacare Tax Credit Lawsuit Struck Down by D.C. District Court

A lawsuit challenging the extension of Obamacare tax credits to federally run health insurance markets was struck down by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

In Halbig v. Sebelius, plaintiffs sued the Obama administration regarding an IRS rule that states that enrollees of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in either state-operated or federally-run health insurance markets will be eligible for premium tax credits, The Washington Times reports. Plaintiffs argued that the law's language limits tax credits to health exchanges in state-operated markets only.

U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman disagreed and found that the rule does indeed apply to both state-run and federally-facilitated health exchanges.

FOIA's Deliberative Process Privilege Protects OLC Opinion

The Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit held that FOIA's deliberative process privilege allows the Department of Justice to deny a request for an Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) Opinion.

The OLC Opinion requested by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) discusses the FBI's authority to request phone records from service providers, but the request was denied after appealing to the D.C. Circuit.

So, how does this case affect FOIA requests?

The D.C. District Court ruled on Monday that the NSA's efforts in collecting phone metadata nationwide are most likely unconstitutional.

In Klayman v. Obama, the District Court Judge Richard J. Leon laid out a scathing, 68-page opinion outlining the myriad reasons why he believed a preliminary injunction was proper to block the NSA's phone surveillance -- largely because he agreed that Klayman was likely to succeed on the merits of his constitutional claims, reports The Washington Post.

Why is this district court decision so different than the past NSA cases?