Decided - FindLaw Important Court Decisions and Settlements Blog

Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog


Lately, we've heard a lot of discourse and protest about excessive use of police violence against minorities. However, there is an equally vulnerable minority group, the mentally ill and disabled, who are also frequent victims of police force.

In the case of City and County of San Francisco v. Sheehan, the Supreme Court considered whether Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act requires police to provide accommodations to armed and violent mentally ill suspects. The Court also looked at whether the Fourth Amendment clearly establishes that officers cannot forcibly enter the home of an armed, mentally ill subject when there was no immediate need.

In its ruling, the Court sidestepped both issues.

Some former Boeing employees may soon finally receive the benefits of a 10-year long class action lawsuit. Talk about perseverance.

Boeing and the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) have agreed on a settlement 10 years after the suit was filled. Boeing will pay $90 million to cover pension and retiree health benefits to former Boeing Co. employees.

Torture. When you think of torture, you think of Zero Dark Thirty and CIA interrogation of suspected terrorists.

Did you ever imagining it happening in your back yard? In Chicago, former police Commander Jon Burge and his "Midnight Crew" tortured over a 100 victims over a period of almost 20 years starting in 1972. The victims, mostly African-American men, reported that Burge and his gang used electric shocks, beatings, smotherings, and simulated Russian roulette to coerce confessions. Four of Burge's victims were sentenced to death after being tortured into giving false confessions. When Illinois Governor George Ryan left office, he pardoned the four men.

Forty years after the torture started, Chicago is making reparations.

Oral arguments before the Supreme Court for the October 2014 Term have ended. Now, the justices and clerks will focus on writing decisions for all the cases heard this term.

Usually, decisions are issued about 90 days after they're heard. However, there are several cases beyond the 90 day average, and we've heard of no decision yet. Maybe they're extra special?

Here are three Supreme Court decisions we're eagerly awaiting:

The Supreme Court upheld a rule prohibiting judges from soliciting funds for their own election campaigns. The Florida Bar had disciplined Lanell Williams-Yulee for mailing and posting a letter online requesting financial contributions to her campaign.

The 5-4 decision united an odd group of justices, and may ask more questions than it answered. So let's take a look at what the Court said, through the opposing opinions.

While using a drug dog to sniff for drugs is not unconstitutional, doing so after a completed traffic stop is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court ruled, in a 6-3 opinion, that the use of a drug dog to sniff for drugs, without any reasonable suspicion, after a completed traffic stop unreasonably extended the stop.

Last month, we wrote about Target's $10M settlement agreement with customers after the massive 2013 data breach. This week, Target has settled another lawsuit, but its legal troubles are far from over.

In a separate lawsuit from the customer class-action suit, financial institutions that issued MasterCard credit cards affected in the data breach sued Target for millions of dollars lost. The banks claimed that they suffered damages reissuing cards and reimbursing consumers for fraudulent charges.

The Supreme Court is reaching the final cases of its October 2014 term, and has some doozies on the docket.

From raisin rights to marriage rights and the right to a humane execution, here are some of the highlights on next week's SCOTUS oral argument calendar.

I'm not saying I did anything wrong, but here's some money.

A group of investors sued Sprint in a class action lawsuit accusing the company of lying to investors about Sprint's merger with Nextel Communications. Sprint recently agreed to settle the lawsuit and pay $131 million, cash, but denied all liability.

We break down quite a few legal decisions on our blogs, and we post some of them over on Courtside. So when you're looking at a court ruling we've published or reading one issued in a case you're involved in, how do you know what you're looking for?

Courts can publish in different formats and employ a lot of "legalese," so here are a few tips on how to read a court decision.