Decided - FindLaw Important Court Decisions and Settlements Blog

Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog


The U.S. Supreme Court revived a UPS employee's claim that the company discriminated against her while she was pregnant. Peggy Young contends UPS refused to lighten her work load during her pregnancy, and sued the company under the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

Lower courts had dismissed the case, but the Supreme Court voted 6-3 to send the case back for a full hearing on the merits.

Remember that massive Target data breach in 2013? Well, some victims may soon be getting a payout for their troubles.

A Minnesota judge has granted preliminary approval of $10 million settlement in a class-action lawsuit against Target. The 2013 data breach may have affected up to 40 million credit and debit card numbers and the personal information of 61 million people. This settlement is in addition to free credit monitoring that Target has already offered its customers.

What does this mean for you? Here's what you need to know:

I've got good news and bad news. The good news: If you've recently gotten one of 24,000 red-light camera tickets in Broward County, Florida, it may have just been dismissed. The bad news: The county just lost about $6.3 million in potential revenue.

Two Broward County judges this week dismissed 24,000 red-light tickets after the red-light camera program was challenged in court for breaking a Florida state law, the ABA Journal reports.

How did so many people get so lucky?

A manufacturer of Infants' and Children's Tylenol and Children's Motrin has pleaded guilty to selling liquid medicine tainted by metal particles. McNeil Consumer Healthcare admitted some batches of over-the-counter medicine contained nickel, iron, and chromium particles.

While both prosecutors and the company said no one was injured by the contaminated medicine, McNeil will nonetheless pay $25 million as part of the plea agreement.

Everybody in New Mexico must report suspected child abuse and neglect, the state's highest court has ruled.

In an opinion released Monday, New Mexico's Supreme Court clarified that the state's mandatory child-abuse reporting requirements applied to all residents of the state, not just to certain publicly employed professionals.

New Mexico already has a law requiring everybody to report child abuse. So why was this ruling necessary?

Don't post sexually explicit pictures of a minor on a revenge porn website. Even more importantly, don't ignore the lawsuit when you get sued!

Eric Chanson and Kevin Bollaert, owners of the (now-defunct) revenge porn website YouGotPosted.com, must now pay a $900,000 default judgment to a young girl whose pictures were posted on the site.

What did they do, and what is a default judgment?

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces has reversed the aggravated assault conviction of former Air Force Tech. Sgt. David J.A. Gutierrez for withholding his HIV diagnosis from sexual partners.

The court cited medical experts who explained there is a 1 in 500 chance of contracting HIV through unprotected heterosexual sex. That's insufficiently likely to inflict grievous bodily harm to support the aggravated assault charge, the court held.

But the court upheld a lesser assault conviction for Gutierrez based on his former sexual partners' not giving informed consent to sexual activity because he hadn't told them about his HIV status.

They say a man who represents himself has a fool for a client. But what about the woman who sues herself?

A Utah woman has filed a lawsuit against herself, claiming that her own negligent driving caused her significant financial and emotional damages. This case is just as convoluted as it sounds, so let's breakdown exactly what's going on here.

An $8.3 million settlement over an inmate's death at a California jail is the largest single civil rights wrongful death settlement in the state's history, lawyers say.

The Alameda County Board of Supervisors and Corizon Health Inc. (which provides jail medical services to the county) have agreed to make substantial inmate care changes and pay $8.3 million to the family of Martin Harrison, who died two days after Santa Rita Jail deputies beat and used a Taser to subdue him, the Bay Area News Group reports.

Part of the settlement mandates that Corizon only staff registered nurses (RNs) at its facilities, as opposed to using licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) as it had done previously. The financial portion of the settlement will go to Harrison's four adult children.

Hot on the heels of FTC and consumer lawsuits against AT&T for "throttling" cell phone data, the FTC has fined discount prepaid cell phone retailer TracFone $40 million over allegations that it throttles "unlimited" data plans.

The $40 million fine will go toward paying refunds to customers who had the bandwidth on their "unlimited" data service slowed by as much as 90 percent when they reached a certain amount of data usage per month.

Which customers are affected, and how can you go about getting a refund?