Decided - FindLaw Important Court Decisions and Settlements Blog

Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog


The Supreme Court is reaching the final cases of its October 2014 term, and has some doozies on the docket.

From raisin rights to marriage rights and the right to a humane execution, here are some of the highlights on next week's SCOTUS oral argument calendar.

I'm not saying I did anything wrong, but here's some money.

A group of investors sued Sprint in a class action lawsuit accusing the company of lying to investors about Sprint's merger with Nextel Communications. Sprint recently agreed to settle the lawsuit and pay $131 million, cash, but denied all liability.

We break down quite a few legal decisions on our blogs, and we post some of them over on Courtside. So when you're looking at a court ruling we've published or reading one issued in a case you're involved in, how do you know what you're looking for?

Courts can publish in different formats and employ a lot of "legalese," so here are a few tips on how to read a court decision.

The U.S. Supreme Court revived a UPS employee's claim that the company discriminated against her while she was pregnant. Peggy Young contends UPS refused to lighten her work load during her pregnancy, and sued the company under the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

Lower courts had dismissed the case, but the Supreme Court voted 6-3 to send the case back for a full hearing on the merits.

Remember that massive Target data breach in 2013? Well, some victims may soon be getting a payout for their troubles.

A Minnesota judge has granted preliminary approval of $10 million settlement in a class-action lawsuit against Target. The 2013 data breach may have affected up to 40 million credit and debit card numbers and the personal information of 61 million people. This settlement is in addition to free credit monitoring that Target has already offered its customers.

What does this mean for you? Here's what you need to know:

I've got good news and bad news. The good news: If you've recently gotten one of 24,000 red-light camera tickets in Broward County, Florida, it may have just been dismissed. The bad news: The county just lost about $6.3 million in potential revenue.

Two Broward County judges this week dismissed 24,000 red-light tickets after the red-light camera program was challenged in court for breaking a Florida state law, the ABA Journal reports.

How did so many people get so lucky?

A manufacturer of Infants' and Children's Tylenol and Children's Motrin has pleaded guilty to selling liquid medicine tainted by metal particles. McNeil Consumer Healthcare admitted some batches of over-the-counter medicine contained nickel, iron, and chromium particles.

While both prosecutors and the company said no one was injured by the contaminated medicine, McNeil will nonetheless pay $25 million as part of the plea agreement.

Everybody in New Mexico must report suspected child abuse and neglect, the state's highest court has ruled.

In an opinion released Monday, New Mexico's Supreme Court clarified that the state's mandatory child-abuse reporting requirements applied to all residents of the state, not just to certain publicly employed professionals.

New Mexico already has a law requiring everybody to report child abuse. So why was this ruling necessary?

Don't post sexually explicit pictures of a minor on a revenge porn website. Even more importantly, don't ignore the lawsuit when you get sued!

Eric Chanson and Kevin Bollaert, owners of the (now-defunct) revenge porn website YouGotPosted.com, must now pay a $900,000 default judgment to a young girl whose pictures were posted on the site.

What did they do, and what is a default judgment?

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces has reversed the aggravated assault conviction of former Air Force Tech. Sgt. David J.A. Gutierrez for withholding his HIV diagnosis from sexual partners.

The court cited medical experts who explained there is a 1 in 500 chance of contracting HIV through unprotected heterosexual sex. That's insufficiently likely to inflict grievous bodily harm to support the aggravated assault charge, the court held.

But the court upheld a lesser assault conviction for Gutierrez based on his former sexual partners' not giving informed consent to sexual activity because he hadn't told them about his HIV status.