Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog

January 2015 Archives

Supreme Ct. Stays Executions, Will Hear Lethal Injection Challenge

For the first time in years, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the lethal injection method of execution is constitutional. The decision to hear the case comes shortly after one Oklahoma state prisoner out of four to file the case was already executed.

At least that won't happen to the other three petitioning prisoners: The High Court granted a stay of their executions until the justices make a ruling.

Does this spell the end of the death penalty? And what is "midazolam," anyway?

Nike Settles With Ralph Lauren Over Chuck Taylor Knock-Offs

Back in October, Nike, which owns Converse, sued 31 companies for manufacturing knock-off versions of those famous "Chuck Taylor" Converse All-Star shoes. You're seen them before: the canvas high-tops with the big star on the ankle.

You've also probably seen the knock-offs, which come dangerously close to looking just like Converse's Chuck Taylors. Well, yesterday, at least one company -- Ralph Lauren -- settled its dispute with Nike. Just 30 more to go!

Home Health Care Workers' Wage Rules Overturned by Federal Judge

A federal judge has overturned the Labor Department's rules providing overtime and minimum-wage protection for home health care workers.

The rules were announced in 2011 by President Obama, reports The Associated Press. Federal employment regulations had previously exempted home health care workers from wage and overtime requirements for other types of employees. The new rules were due to take effect January 1, but had been delayed pending the judge's ruling.

What led to the judge's decision in this case?

Calif.'s Foie Gras Ban Struck Down by Federal Judge

A federal judge has struck down California's ban on foie gras on the grounds that it conflicts with federal poultry regulations.

California's ban on the controversial French delicacy was first signed into law in 2004, taking effect in 2012. But on Wednesday, U.S. District Court Judge Stephen Wilson sided with a group of restaurants, foie gras producers, and farmers who argued that the California law was unconstitutional, reports the Los Angeles Times.

What led to the ruling, and what does it mean for foie gras fans in California?