Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog

April 2015 Archives

The Supreme Court upheld a rule prohibiting judges from soliciting funds for their own election campaigns. The Florida Bar had disciplined Lanell Williams-Yulee for mailing and posting a letter online requesting financial contributions to her campaign.

The 5-4 decision united an odd group of justices, and may ask more questions than it answered. So let's take a look at what the Court said, through the opposing opinions.

While using a drug dog to sniff for drugs is not unconstitutional, doing so after a completed traffic stop is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court ruled, in a 6-3 opinion, that the use of a drug dog to sniff for drugs, without any reasonable suspicion, after a completed traffic stop unreasonably extended the stop.

Last month, we wrote about Target's $10M settlement agreement with customers after the massive 2013 data breach. This week, Target has settled another lawsuit, but its legal troubles are far from over.

In a separate lawsuit from the customer class-action suit, financial institutions that issued MasterCard credit cards affected in the data breach sued Target for millions of dollars lost. The banks claimed that they suffered damages reissuing cards and reimbursing consumers for fraudulent charges.

The Supreme Court is reaching the final cases of its October 2014 term, and has some doozies on the docket.

From raisin rights to marriage rights and the right to a humane execution, here are some of the highlights on next week's SCOTUS oral argument calendar.

I'm not saying I did anything wrong, but here's some money.

A group of investors sued Sprint in a class action lawsuit accusing the company of lying to investors about Sprint's merger with Nextel Communications. Sprint recently agreed to settle the lawsuit and pay $131 million, cash, but denied all liability.