Decided - The FindLaw Noteworthy Decisions and Settlements Blog

March 2018 Archives

Warrantless Cell Phone Searches at U.S. Border OK in Florida Case

People are guaranteed certain rights in the criminal justice system. One of those rights is to be free of random searches. The Fourth Amendment requires police to have probable cause in order to search an individual, which usually must be evidenced through a warrant. There are certain circumstances, however, where a search warrant is not necessary before conducting a search. According to the 11th Circuit, the warrantless search of a Florida man's cell phone didn't violate the Fourth Amendment.

Texas Can Enforce Ban on Sanctuary Cities, 5th Circuit Rules

With President Trump and his administration's focus on immigration, it's no surprise that immigration topics are often in the news. A bulk of the current news relating to immigration pertains to undocumented immigrants and the concept of sanctuary cities. Cities that consider themselves sanctuaries limit the amount of assistance that law enforcement and other government employees can give to the federal government when it comes to matters relating to immigration.

Powerball Jackpot Winner Wins Anonymity

Many people dream about winning the lottery. They think of all the things they would buy, the good they could do, and how they would spend their time. What they probably don't think about is how everyone knowing that you won the lottery could actually have a negative impact on your life.

The winner of the $560 million dollar Powerball jackpot did actually realize the negative impact that comes with making your lottery win public, and requested to remain anonymous. Lucky for the New Hampshire woman, the judge in her case agreed, ruling that she can remain anonymous because her "right to privacy outweighs public interests."

Oregon Bans Domestic Violence Convicts From Owning Guns

Guns will always be a hot issue, especially since it involves trying to balance citizens' Second Amendment rights and prevent gun violence. One step legislators are taking to stop gun violence is limiting the gun ownership of domestic violence convicts.

Oregon is the latest state to pass a law banning domestic violence convicts from owning guns. More specifically, the governor of Oregon, Kate Brown, signed a law that closes a loophole that permits people to buy and keep guns after a domestic violence or stalking conviction.