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As a result of the 2013 holiday shopping season data breach at Target stores across the country, the retailer has agreed to pay $18.5 million to end a multistate enforcement action. This settlement is reported to be the largest ever in a multistate consumer data-breach enforcement action.

The multimillion dollar settlement will get stretched relatively thin though as it is set to be divided by 47 different states. California, which will receive almost $1.5 million from the settlement, is getting the largest share. These funds will not be going to consumers, but rather to the state's consumer protection enforcement offices. However, this settlement is in addition to a $10 million settlement that was recently approved in the consumer class action stemming from the same incident.

The company that promised it could, but then couldn't, Theranos has agreed to pay out over $4.5 million to settle the Arizona class action case against it. The settlement resolves the consumer protection and fraud claims against the blood testing company brought by Arizona.

The settlement will provide each individual who used Theranos in Arizona between 2013-2016 with a full refund. With 175,000 class members, the average breaks down to around $25 per person. In addition to the monetary relief for consumers, a $25,000 attorney fee award was secured, as well as an agreement for Theranos to cease operation in Arizona for two years.

A federal court judge has approved the $25 million class action settlement against Trump University. The case stemmed from allegations of fraud and misrepresentation, in essence claiming that Trump University provided no value to students, and worse, simply took advantage of students. The settlement actually resolves three separate cases against Trump University that all stem from similar allegations.

Although neither President Donald Trump, nor the Trump University, will be required to admit fault, a $25 million settlement says quite a bit about who was in the wrong, particularly given that the facts were heavily one sided against Trump University. The settlement was approved by the same Indiana-born judge whom President Trump accused of being biased against him for wanting to build the border wall due to the judge's heritage.

A common trend amongst the sharing economy employers is to avoid the legal complications of having a regular workforce. However, avoiding legal complications often results in legal battles. Fortunately, for Instacart, the class action that could have potentially reclassified their workforce from independent contractors to employees has settled without upsetting the burgeoning app's status quo.

The Instacart workers were seeking relief for numerous alleged violations of labor codes, including a failure to reimburse expenses, tip pooling, and a lack of a grievance procedure when a worker is deactivated. Under the settlement, the three lead plaintiffs will each receive $5,000, while other workers in the class will receive $500 to $1000 each.

Last week, a class action settlement between Uber and the company's riders was approved by the federal district court in San Francisco. The ride share company was facing class action claims for deceiving riders about tipping drivers. The settlement refunds to riders all tip monies purportedly wrongly taken by the company.

A Virginia man is breathing a sigh of relief after the court ruled that his ex-fiance must return the $26,000 engagement ring for the marriage that will never happen. The court ruled that the ring was aptly characterized as a conditional gift, which meant that if the marriage didn't take place, it would need to be returned. Since the marriage has been off for a few years now, the court ordered the ex-fiance to return the ring or pay the $26,000.

Despite marriage seeming like so much more, it really boils down to a financial agreement between two adults, akin to a business partnership. Engagement rings can be viewed as earnest money, or a security deposit, in a business venture. Sometimes it's refundable, sometimes it isn't. Generally, it boils down to how the ring is characterized at the time it is given, or maybe at the time of the breakup.

An Illinois judge recently ruled against Dennis Hastert, allowing the victim of the former politician's sexual abuse to proceed with his contract enforcement action. The case stems from a recently entered into oral settlement agreement between Hastert and an unnamed individual whom Hastert abused in the 1970s while the individual was a minor.

In 2010, Hastert agreed to pay $3.5 million to the unnamed individual in installments over a period of time. When Hastert had neared the half way point, in about 2014, Federal authorities became suspicious of Hastert's banking activity. As a result of the incremental withdraws from his bank account, Hastert was charged with the crime of structuring, which makes it a crime to attempt to hide certain banking transactions. The unnamed victim filed suit back in April of this year.

Airbnb, the popular site for short-term lodging, just had a race discrimination case dismissed because of the arbitration clause buried in the site's terms of service. The case alleged that an African American customer was denied accommodations by various Airbnb hosts when using his normal account, but he was allowed to rent when he used a fake account pretending to be white.

While Airbnb has since revamped its anti-discrimination policies and required the hosts to sign a "community commitment," their lawyers are likely breathing a sigh of relief after the federal court ruling. The ruling requires all user grievances against the company, even civil rights complaints and class actions, to be settled via the arbitration process outlined in the website's terms of service.

The 2nd Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld the $450 million settlement in a case charging Apple with fixing prices on e-books. The settlement had been challenged by one e-books purchaser, who questioned the fairness, reasonableness, and adequacy of the class action settlement.

Pending Apple's appeal to the Supreme Court, the company will be forced to reimburse consumers for playing a "central role" in a price-fixing scheme designed to undercut their major competitor, Amazon. The settlement calls for Apple to pay $400 million to compensate consumers and another $50 million in legal fees.

2014 in Review: The 10 Most Popular 'Decided' Blog Posts

This has been a big year for landmark decisions and settlements, and FindLaw's Decided was there to cover all of 2014's big legal moments.

There were Supreme Court decisions and denials, companies settling over less than honest business practices, and even a reminder on how social media can screw up a perfectly good legal agreement.

Here's to 2014, and here's the Top 10 cases you loved most from this year: