Injury & Tort Law Decisions: Decided
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For the second time in three months, Johnson & Johnson has lost a jury trial linking use of its talcum powder-based products to cancer. In this case, a Missouri jury has awarded a woman $55 million who contracted ovarian cancer after using the company's products for feminine hygiene.

This follows an earlier award of $72 million to a deceased woman's family in February, and is another of thousands of pending lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson.

Cleveland will pay Tamir Rice's family $6 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit after Rice was shot and killed by a police officer in 2014. It represents the city's largest settlement in a police-related lawsuit, but the city admitted no wrongdoing in the 12-year-old's shooting, which occurred while he was playing with a toy gun in a park.

The settlement is on par with other police misconduct claims nationwide, and was a long time coming for the Rice family.

The Suave Professionals Keratin Infusion 30-Day Smoothing Kit promised to smooth your style and give it a keratin treatment. Instead, hundreds of women suffered hair loss and scalp burns when they tried it. Those hundreds of women joined several class action lawsuits against Unilever, maker of the Suave products, and the Seventh Circuit has upheld a $10 million dollar settlement in the case.

The company will also reimburse thousands of women the $10 it cost to buy a hair product that caused visible bald spots, broken hair, and burned scalps.

Wine Makers Toast Arsenic Case Dismissal

California wine makers are toasting the dismissal of a lawsuit claiming arsenic levels are dangerously high and bottles are improperly labeled. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge John Shepard Wiley dismissed a class-action lawsuit that named five of the state's six largest wine producers, finding that their existing warnings comply with regulations. But the plaintiffs have already said they'll appeal the ruling.

Jinia Armstrong Lopez was worried that her brother Ronald Armstrong might be a danger to himself. Armstrong had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and paranoid schizophrenia, was off his medication, and was poking holes in his leg "to let the air out." She tried to have him admitted into a hospital, but when he fled, a doctor drafted involuntary commitment papers and the police were dispatched to make sure he didn't hurt himself.

The officers succeeded, but not in the way anyone imagined. Armstrong never had the opportunity to do himself harm because mere minutes after the commitment papers were finalized, Armstrong was declared dead after officers Tased him five times and forcefully restrained him.

In season three of "Justified" U.S. Marshal Raylan battles illegal OxyContin dealers in the hills of Kentucky. As it turns out, Kentucky itself has been battling legal Oxy producers in court for the past 8 years, and the state finally secured a $24 million settlement in the case.

The so-called "Heroin of the Hills" has been ravaging the state for over a decade, leading to explosions in drug addiction and abuse, and increased medical costs. Kentucky is hoping to use the funds to prevent drug use and provide addiction treatment services to state residents.

You may have been annoyed by receiving a barrage of "Add Connections" emails from LinkedIn users. But imagine how they felt when they found out the professional networking site had hijacked their email contacts to spam those messages out. They were not pleased.

In response, users filed a class action lawsuit against LinkedIn, claiming the emails damaged their reputations. And now the company has agreed to pay $13 million to settle the suit. So check your Inbox to see if you'll get some of the settlement.

The USS Cole was refueling in Yemen in October of 2000 when two al-Qaeda suicide bombers blew a hole in its hull. The attack killed 17 sailors and injured another 39. Fifteen of the injured sailors and three of their spouses filed a federal lawsuit against Sudan in 2010, claiming the country helped facilitate the bombing by lending material support to al-Qaeda.

The victims won the case, and now a federal appeals court in New York is ordering three banks to turn over Sudanese funds to satisfy the judgment.

It hasn't been a great year for General Motors. The auto manufacturer has been plagued with recalls and lawsuits regarding potentially deadly ignition switch defects. In all, GM's faulty ignition switch has been tied to at least 124 deaths.

Now the company is paying $900 million to the criminal charges related to the ignition switch. So where does GM go from here, and what will the settlement mean for existing civil lawsuits?

Last month, we wrote about Target's $10M settlement agreement with customers after the massive 2013 data breach. This week, Target has settled another lawsuit, but its legal troubles are far from over.

In a separate lawsuit from the customer class-action suit, financial institutions that issued MasterCard credit cards affected in the data breach sued Target for millions of dollars lost. The banks claimed that they suffered damages reissuing cards and reimbursing consumers for fraudulent charges.