Injury & Tort Law Decisions: Decided
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You may have been annoyed by receiving a barrage of "Add Connections" emails from LinkedIn users. But imagine how they felt when they found out the professional networking site had hijacked their email contacts to spam those messages out. They were not pleased.

In response, users filed a class action lawsuit against LinkedIn, claiming the emails damaged their reputations. And now the company has agreed to pay $13 million to settle the suit. So check your Inbox to see if you'll get some of the settlement.

The USS Cole was refueling in Yemen in October of 2000 when two al-Qaeda suicide bombers blew a hole in its hull. The attack killed 17 sailors and injured another 39. Fifteen of the injured sailors and three of their spouses filed a federal lawsuit against Sudan in 2010, claiming the country helped facilitate the bombing by lending material support to al-Qaeda.

The victims won the case, and now a federal appeals court in New York is ordering three banks to turn over Sudanese funds to satisfy the judgment.

It hasn't been a great year for General Motors. The auto manufacturer has been plagued with recalls and lawsuits regarding potentially deadly ignition switch defects. In all, GM's faulty ignition switch has been tied to at least 124 deaths.

Now the company is paying $900 million to the criminal charges related to the ignition switch. So where does GM go from here, and what will the settlement mean for existing civil lawsuits?

Last month, we wrote about Target's $10M settlement agreement with customers after the massive 2013 data breach. This week, Target has settled another lawsuit, but its legal troubles are far from over.

In a separate lawsuit from the customer class-action suit, financial institutions that issued MasterCard credit cards affected in the data breach sued Target for millions of dollars lost. The banks claimed that they suffered damages reissuing cards and reimbursing consumers for fraudulent charges.

A manufacturer of Infants' and Children's Tylenol and Children's Motrin has pleaded guilty to selling liquid medicine tainted by metal particles. McNeil Consumer Healthcare admitted some batches of over-the-counter medicine contained nickel, iron, and chromium particles.

While both prosecutors and the company said no one was injured by the contaminated medicine, McNeil will nonetheless pay $25 million as part of the plea agreement.

They say a man who represents himself has a fool for a client. But what about the woman who sues herself?

A Utah woman has filed a lawsuit against herself, claiming that her own negligent driving caused her significant financial and emotional damages. This case is just as convoluted as it sounds, so let's breakdown exactly what's going on here.

An $8.3 million settlement over an inmate's death at a California jail is the largest single civil rights wrongful death settlement in the state's history, lawyers say.

The Alameda County Board of Supervisors and Corizon Health Inc. (which provides jail medical services to the county) have agreed to make substantial inmate care changes and pay $8.3 million to the family of Martin Harrison, who died two days after Santa Rita Jail deputies beat and used a Taser to subdue him, the Bay Area News Group reports.

Part of the settlement mandates that Corizon only staff registered nurses (RNs) at its facilities, as opposed to using licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) as it had done previously. The financial portion of the settlement will go to Harrison's four adult children.

TracFone's $40M Fine for Data Throttling: How to Claim Your Refund

Hot on the heels of FTC and consumer lawsuits against AT&T for "throttling" cell phone data, the FTC has fined discount prepaid cell phone retailer TracFone $40 million over allegations that it throttles "unlimited" data plans.

The $40 million fine will go toward paying refunds to customers who had the bandwidth on their "unlimited" data service slowed by as much as 90 percent when they reached a certain amount of data usage per month.

Which customers are affected, and how can you go about getting a refund?

Toyota to Pay $11M for Design Defect, a Factor in Fatal Crash

Toyota must pay $11 million to the victims of a fatal 2006 crash after a federal jury found that the design of the car contributed to the crash.

Koua Fong Lee was the driver of the 1996 Toyota Camry that slammed into another car at high speed, killing that car's driver, the driver's son, and a 6-year-old passenger who was paralyzed and died a year later.

The suit follows revelations that Toyota suffered problems with sudden acceleration in some vehicles. What are the legal issues involved here?

This has been a big year for landmark decisions and settlements, and FindLaw's Decided was there to cover all of 2014's big legal moments.

There were Supreme Court decisions and denials, companies settling over less than honest business practices, and even a reminder on how social media can screw up a perfectly good legal agreement.

Here's to 2014, and here's the Top 10 cases you loved most from this year: