U.S. Eighth Circuit - The FindLaw 8th Circuit Court of Appeals Opinion Summaries Blog

June 2016 Archives

8th Circuit: Scanning Credit Cards Is Not a Search

After a recent ruling by the Eighth Circuit, police can access the information on the back of your credit/debit/gift card without having to obtain a search warrant first. Why? Because it's not a search under the Fourth Amendment, the circuit ruled. If this doesn't scare you, perhaps it should, because it has the potential to undermine the digital privacy law as recently laid out by Riley v. California.

Here, there seems to be a colorable argument to be made that the Eighth Circuit's opinion cuts against a reasonable application of Riley as it might apply to credit cards. Should cell phone law apply to magnetic strips?

8th Cir. Revives Federal Claims by Michael Brown Juror

Federal claims by one of the jurors in the Michael Brown case were revived by the Eighth Circuit. Additional controversy in the critical "Black Lives Matter" case was stirred when the anonymous juror -- known only as "Jane Doe" -- suggested that not all jurors unanimously agreed not to indict police officer Darren Wilson.

Doe, who apparently feels quite strongly about her opinion, faces the possibility of having misdemeanor counts brought against her for disclosing the goings-on of jury deliberations, according to the Associated Press.

Ventura's 'American Sniper' Reward Cut Down to Size by 8th Circuit

It appears that former Minnesota governor Jesse Ventura's recent $1.8 million victory against the estate of Chris Kyle of American Sniper fame will be reduced following a ruling by the Eighth Circuit. The overturned award related to disputes over Ventura's defamation win, which the circuit found had been tainted with improper testimony of insurance.

Obviously, the MPAA and other producers reacted warmly to the Eighth Circuit's ruling.

A whistleblowing employee is not protected from retaliation under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act if a reasonable person, in his position and with his same training and experience, would not have believed there was a securities violation to report, the Eighth Circuit ruled this week. The ruling makes the Eighth Circuit the fourth federal appellate court to endorse the so-called Sylvester standard, first adopted by the Department of Labor's Administrative Review Board in 2012.

The ruling came as the Eighth Circuit rejected the claims of Vincent Beacom, a former vice president of sales at Oracle's Retail Global Business Unit. Beacom had complained about a change in revenue projection procedures which he felt mislead Oracle's shareholders. RGBU's revenues made up less than one fifth of one percent of Oracle's revenue at the time.