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Scenario #1: You took a DUI defense case for a fixed fee. She's a first time offender, no record, barely over the limit, but the case is strong. It's probably going to plead out, right? This case should not take a lot of time, except someone needs to spend hours answering every single one of her questions. You know this type of client -- the freaked out emails/phone calls/texts come every hour.

Scenario #2: There are fourteen courthouses in Miami, Florida, some state, some federal. Your client has both a misdemeanor marijuana possession charge, and a child custody dispute. Somehow, he ended up at the federal courthouse. How do you get him where he needs to go?

Whether your client needs a general overview of the law, a local perspective, or simply a map to the courthouse, we're making your job easier -- starting right now.

Got some spare time on your hands? Or perhaps, do you have some fresh associates that could use some "real world" practice beyond what they get from reviewing your work?

The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida is seeking a few good men and women to represent the indigent. And though the Volunteer Lawyers Program (VLP) has been shuttered, that doesn't mean the court has given up.

On the contrary, Chief Judge Federico A. Moreno just sent out a memo [PDF] describing the new Pro Bono Panel project, urging members of the local legal community to get involved.

11th Cir. Is Super Busy, Super Quick: Judiciary Report

The Eleventh Circuit is one of the busiest and quickest federal appeals courts in the nation, according to a recently released "Judicial Caseload Profile" of the court released by the judiciary.

The report presents statistics on the work of the Federal Judiciary for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2013, comparing data for this year to data for prior years.

The seat was Judge William Thomas's, until it wasn't. He was approved by both Florida senators, vetted, and appeared set for the nomination to replace now-Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Adalberto Jordan. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) had a change of heart and blue-slip blocked the nomination, allegedly due to Judge Thomas's "judicial temperament" and doubt about his ability to hand out fair sentences.

Many believe the move was political, and due to Judge Thomas's sexual orientation.

There won't be a change of heart, it seems, as the district court seat is now set to be filled by Judge Robin Rosenberg (not to be confused with Judge Robin Rosenbaum, who was recently nominated to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals bench after a few years with the district court). She comes to the federal court from the state court bench.

Last month, a long-rumored bipartisan deal to fill a number of district court and Court of Appeals vacancies finally went through, much to the chagrin of Georgia civil rights leaders. Out of the six nominees, only one was a racial minority, and two had previously taken controversial stances on divisive issues (Confederate flags and voter ID laws).

Now, Advocacy for Action, a coalition of African-American attorneys, has asked Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. to allow the organization to testify in opposition to the slate of nominees.

Curious about the Eleventh Circuit vacancies? After a long-rumored bipartisan deal came to fruition last month, that left only one vacancy on the Circuit Court of Appeals: Judge Joel Dubina's recently-vacated spot, created when he moved to senior status late last year.

Assuming the seven pending nominees are confirmed, that would leave the Circuit Court of Appeals bench with eight Democratic appointees (one of whom was rumored to be picked by the Republicans as part of the deal, and had previously been appointed to the district court by a Republican president) and three Republican appointees, plus Dubina's vacancy.

And though the backlog of nominations seems to be clearing, based on the years it took to fill other vacancies in the circuit, we expected Dubina's seat to be vacant for a while.

We knew that the rumored deal had been struck, and that the bipartisan nominees were pending, and we heard some rumblings about diversity concerns a few months back.

Even still, the latest out of Georgia came as a bit of a surprise. On Monday, civil rights leaders called for President Barack Obama to withdraw his nominees for judicial vacancies in the Eleventh Circuit, particularly two nominees in for Georgia-based federal district courts, citing one candidate's approval of a Confederate battle emblem on the state flag, and another candidate's support of a controversial state voter ID law.

Who says there's no compromising in today's Washington D.C.?

Way back in September, we passed along a rumor that the White House was mulling over a "West Wing"-like deal to fill the numerous vacancies in the Eleventh Circuit. The Democrats would get their long-desired nominee, Jill Pryor, who was blocked by Georgia's Republican senators last year, while the Republicans would get their choice, Judge Julie Carnes, an extremely qualified district court judge appointed to the bench by President George H. W. Bush.

Judge Pryor's nomination has been pending for over a year. Judge Carnes's nomination was announced this morning.

Speaking of the district court, President Obama's list for those vacancies, sent to the Senate today, includes the Democrats' rumored choice, as well as the Republicans' rumored three choices.

Earlier this month, Congress did the unthinkable: they invoked the so-called "nuclear option" and removed the filibuster option for blocking the president's nominees from being brought to a vote, with the exception of Supreme Court nominations.

Though much attention (rightfully) has been paid to the D.C. Circuit, with its three vacancies, and its importance in national matters, we're more concerned with the local impact. Will the removal of the filibuster allow thirteen Eleventh Circuit vacancies (four of which are on the circuit court of appeals itself) to be filled in a timely manner, or will the oft-forgotten Blue Slips tactic rise up in its place?

It's official! Well, Judge Robin Rosenbaum's Eleventh Circuit nomination is, at least. If past nominations are any indication, confirmation is no sure thing. That being said, Rosenbaum certainly seems like a savvy nomination by President Barack Obama.

And in unsurprising news, the Supreme Court denied certiorari in an unpublished case that we covered earlier, which means unpaid interns will have to wait a little longer for their day in front of the nation's high court.