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Former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell and his wife's indictment was good reading, but the hilarity didn't stop with the initial pleadings. Thanks to a recent spate of filings, some with little to no basis in existing laws, the judge in the case, U.S. District Judge James Spencer, asked the prosecutors and defense attorneys to limit their filings "for the sanctity of the trees."

Judge Spencer also dismissed McDonell's request to allow a related civil case to move forward, in hopes that evidence favorable to the defense would emerge, stating that the defense was "dancing through fantasyland," reports The Washington Post.

Stay tuned folks. This is probably going to be one heck of a show.

This is definitely one of the most egregious cases of prosecutorial misconduct that you'll ever see.

We last saw former death row inmate Justin Wolfe in May 2013, when the Fourth Circuit reversed the district court's order preventing the state from re-prosecuting Wolfe for a murder-for-hire. The district court's order came after Brady violations in the original trial, a defied habeas judgment that ordered the state to retry or release Wolf within 120 days, and a wee bit of witness intimidation.

The Fourth Circuit, while sympathetic, held that federal district courts lack the power to bar state courts from re-prosecuting. Wolfe is hoping that the Supreme Court feels differently.

Last year, secure email provider Lavabit chose to shut down rather than sell out its customers by complying with a controversial court order.

Today, it is challenging that court order in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

What's at stake? It's not just the company. It's privacy rights and free speech.

It looks like Virginia may soon join the ranks of the states that recognize gay marriages.

This morning, the new Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Virginia, Mark R. Herring, announced that he would stop fighting to uphold the state's voter-approved ban on gay marriage, and would instead join the other side of the federal lawsuit, reports The New York Times.

And to think, just last year, the then-Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ken Cuccinelli, was fighting tooth-and-nail to uphold the state's anti-sodomy law.

We've all read criminal cases where we think, "How can they be this stupid?" And we've all seen cases where, out of stupidity, carelessness, or desperation, people pile mistakes upon mistakes.

But it's different when the crimes are allegedly carried out by politicians. We expect them to be smarter. Not so much, for former Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife Maureen.

The McDonnell indictment contains page after page after page of alleged quid-pro-quo. Gifts and loans were allegedly exchanged for access to the Governor's office and promotion of a private company's nutritional supplement.

The Eric C. Conn Law Complex is an interesting place. From the photos and videos of the welded-together trailers, to the Lincoln Monument and Statue of Liberty replicas on the lot, the setting is reminiscent of every lawyer stereotype the rest of us laugh about. Uproxx calls him the "Real life Saul Goodman," which isn't too far off, except the whole criminal aspect.

Except, that's exactly what the federal government is calling him.

Earlier this week, a Congressional report implicated Conn and retired Administrative Law Judge David B. Daugherty in a Social Security disability scheme that processed thousands of claims in "assembly-line fashion. The report accuses Conn of using manufactured evidence in claims brought before Judge Daugherty, which were rubber stamped en masse by the now-retired judge, reports The Associated Press.

5 Things to Know About Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III

Here at FindLaw, we understand the pressures of being a legal professional - most of us are recovering lawyers - so we want to help by tossing you that preferred life preserver of the legal profession, the short list.

Though Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has been known as one of the more conservative appellate courts for years, the majority of the judges on the 15-member court were appointed by Democrats. Judge J. Harvie Wilkerson III, the lone remaining Reagan appointee, is not only a notable conservative on the court, he's also the longest-serving Fourth Circuit judge.

Judge Stephanie Thacker Sworn in to Fourth Circuit

Stephanie Thacker was sworn in as the first female judge from West Virginia to serve on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, reports the West Virginia Record. West Virginia’s senators, Jay Rockefeller and Joe Manchin, joined Chief District Judge Joseph R. Goodwin, Thacker’s family, friends and some former co-workers at her investiture.

Judge Thacker was confirmed by the Senate for the appellate bench in April by a vote of 91-3. Senators Jim De Mint (R-S.C.), Mike Lee (R-Utah) and David Vitter (R-La.) opposed her confirmation.

Federal Judicial Center Guide Wins Thomas Jefferson Award

If you can’t get your fill of the law practicing before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, perhaps you would like to leave your office for a field trip to the federal archives.

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) keeps most federal records at the NARA facilities in Washington, D.C. and College Park, Maryland. (Also known as, in the Fourth Circuit’s back yard.)

NYT's James Risen Claims Reporter's Privilege in CIA Leak Appeal

Like lawyers and priests, people tell journalists secrets. Unlike lawyers and priests, journalists get to spill those secrets to the public.

Occasionally the long arm of the law knocks on a journalist's door, demanding the names of secret-sharing sources. The journalist, of course, can choose to play the moral superiority trump card and declare, "I would rather go to jail than reveal my sources." Sometimes they wind up in jail. Sometimes they ask the courts to apply the reporter's privilege.