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Here are three great things Maryland has: the very first national highway, most of the Chesapeake Bay, and the only state flag based on English heraldry. Now here's a fourth: access to FindLaw's newly launched Code of Maryland and Constitution section, the best new source for Maryland laws online.

So whether you're looking for Maryland's constitution, or its criminal procedure laws, or the nation's only law on how to set up a flagpole, you can now find them here, right on FindLaw, and entirely for free.

Things got a little better for parties seeking to recover attorney's fees in the Fourth Circuit this week. On Tuesday, the Fourth ruled that Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 41(d), which seeks to deter forum shopping and "vexatious" lawsuits, allows courts to award attorney's fees, but with limits.

Some courts have fully rejected the idea that Rule 41(d) entitles parties to recover attorney's fees, while others have awarded them almost as a matter of right. The Fourth Circuit's decision places it firmly between these two extremes, allowing recovery of fees only where the underlying statute defines costs to include attorney's fees, or where plaintiffs had acted in bad faith and vexatiously.

Jail time is becoming ever more likely for former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell, who was convicted of public corruption charges last year. McDonnell's conviction stemmed from accepting $177,000 in loans, gifts, and other perks in exchange for promoting a friend's dietary supplements.

 

McDonnell was sentenced to two years in prison but has remained free while he appeals the conviction. The Fourth Circuit rejected his appeal last week, bringing him one step closer to serving time.

Md. AG Files Response in Adnan Syed's Petition for New Trial

After the wild success of the "Serial" podcast, Adnan Syed, convicted in 2000 of the murder of former girlfriend and fellow high school student Hae Min Lee, was granted a new appeal by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.

Actually, the appeal was in progress before the podcast series began, but interviews conducted by reporters for "Serial" led to the discovery of more evidence on appeal that Syed contends his lawyer should have introduced.

Judge Roger Gregory is the first African American judge to sit on the Fourth Circuit. He's also the only judge we know to have ever been appointed to the same judicial seat by two separate presidents.

Aside from these distinctions, Gregory is also known for authoring the Fourth Circuit's opinion in King v. Burwell, which upheld the Affordable Care Act's subsidies. That opinion, coming from a court once described as "the most aggressively conservative federal appeals court in the nation," helped maintain a central piece of Obamacare -- a piece that is currently before the Supreme Court.

The District Court of South Carolina can't avoid hearing a dispute over who is the proper leader of the Protestant Episcopal Church in South Carolina, the Fourth Circuit held on Tuesday. The unusual case pitted two rival Bishops, the Reverend Mark J. Lawrence and the Reverend Charles G. vonRosenberg, against each other, with each claiming that they were the rightful leader of the church and thus entitled to use its trademarks.

The controversy, like all great religious disputes, stems from a schism in the Church. The conservative Diocese of South Carolina split from the more liberal Episcopal leadership over the national denomination's increasing acceptance of gay and lesbian church members. At stake are not just the souls of Southern Episcopalians, but also $500 million in church property and the right to Church trademarks.

Federal prosecutors filed their first response to an appeal by former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell on Thursday. McDonnell was convicted of 11 counts of public corruption last September, relating from his relationship with a Richmond businessman who had given him over $177,000 in loans and gifts.

McDonnell contends that his conviction is invalid, that he never promised or performed any "official acts" in exchange for gifts and that his prosecution is a threat to democracy. Prosecutors' the one-hundred some page long filing argues that the court must uphold McDonnell's conviction.

Bob McDonnell Sentenced to 2 Years in Prison

The saga of disgraced former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell came to some kind of resolution today as he was sentenced to two years in prison, less than what prosecutors wanted.

McDonnell and his wife Maureen were charged last year with public corruption for taking $177,000 in gifts while McDonnell was governor. The trial turned from a simple bribery case into a sideshow that placed the McDonnell's allegedly troubled marriage in the spotlight.

Does Gag Order in Ex-Massey Energy CEO's Criminal Case Go Too Far?

It's extremely hard these days to get indictments against corporate officers for corporate wrongdoing, but the feds managed it in the case of Donald Blankenship, the former chief executive of Massey Energy, one of the country's largest coal mining companies.

Blankenship was indicted on federal conspiracy and false statement charges for allegedly covering up mine safety violations that led to an explosion, killing 29 miners at the Upper Big Branch coal mine in West Virginia four years ago. Now, though, a federal court has imposed a gag order on the whole thing.

Lawyers in Ecuador-Chevron Suit Must Hand Over Privileged Documents

"The story of the conflict between Chevron and the residents of the Lago Agrio region of the Ecuadorian Amazon must be among the most extensively told in the history of the American federal judiciary," begins the Fourth Circuit's opinion in yet another chapter of the litigation.

This time, the case is captioned Chevron v. Aaron Page.