Free Enterprise - The FindLaw Small Business Law Blog

How Do Mom Biz Owners Take Maternity Leave?

More small business owners than ever are women. That means some of those businesses have to figure out how to deal with maternity leave for an owner.

Executives and owners are entitled to a maternity leave just like any other employee but often it can be hard to let go and accept the time off. Companies don't run themselves, after all. So any extended leave can lead to complications.

New moms deserve some time off to enjoy their little ones. But you also need to protect the company so that it doesn't suffer or get into legal trouble while a director is on maternity leave.

The one "convenience" of planning for maternity leave is that you have a while to do it. Even if a female executive doesn't want to disclose her pregnancy until after the first trimester, that still gives the company six months to prepare itself.

Companies, and new mom owners, need to recognize that things will need to change during maternity leave. Delegating some tasks and automating others, including payroll, is a good first step.

Writing up a clear plan and schedule of important tasks, similar to your original business plan, can give employees guidance when you're out the office. In some cases, letting go a little and allowing other employees to take charge can benefit the company, reports Bloomberg Businessweek.

It's important to recognize what areas of business are crucial for growth and success and which ones need attention to avoid legal issues.

Some aspects, like employment issues, government filings, intellectual property, and advertising or sales need monitoring to ensure they comply with the law. But you don't have to do it yourself.

During maternity leave, you can rely more on your attorney to take care of your business's legal needs.

Just like you'd rely on an expert to deal with complex things like taxes and accounting, find an attorney you can trust to handle legal logistics. That allows you and your company to put focus elsewhere during this hectic time.

When the baby comes, you need to be prepared to balance parenthood and business. But if you don't feel prepared (and who does really?) at least you have it down on paper.

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