Greedy Associates

Greedy Associates - The FindLaw Legal Lifestyle and Career Blog


A while ago, we offered some advice on typography and typesetting, much of which we learned from reading Matthew Butterick's excellent book Typography for Lawyers. But we'd be remiss if we focused exclusively on the lawyer-end of readability. What about the courts? As the Seventh Circuit has made clear, it's thinking about typography and readability -- even as others aren't.

Here are some good (and not so good) alternatives to Times New Roman (TNR) we've seen in court opinions.

Congrats Morgan Lewis: you've now an even bigger BigLaw firm.

Last week, Morgan Lewis acqui-hired most of Bingham McCutchen, bringing on 525 lawyers and staffers, as well as 226 partners from the now-former firm. The move expands Morgan Lewis to around 2,000 lawyers in 28 offices, reports the ABA Journal. It means more or expanded practice areas for ML, and a few fleeing partners from the new conglomerate -- of the 307 listed partners at Bingham, 226 are making the move. The rest, presumably, are headed for other BigLaw firms. Thirty Bingham staffers are losing their jobs as well.

As for the associates, it looks like most, if not all, are making the cut. Here are a few thoughts for them, as well as anyone who doesn't make the cut:

The life of the BigLaw associate is centered around billable hours, and get about 2,000 of them in a year. Who hates them? Associates hate to keep track of them and meet them. Clients always think they're being cheated. And all of their spouses hate hearing about it.

Seems like only partners like billable hours. Jackson Lewis, however, decided to buck the system. Starting in 2015, reports Above the Law, 293 of its associates will longer be tied to them "as an evaluative tool."

After months of flashbacks and teasing, we've finally arrived at the "Winter Finale" of "HTGAWM," where the question #WhoKilledSam gets #answered. The next question is what tantalizing event they're going to dangle in front of us for the next half of the season. This week's episode had nothing to talk about in the realm of "Monster of the Week" or law school, outside of a nod to final exams. Then came the murderousness. Big spoilers ahead. Big.

That's Detective Goth Girl

At the behest of Detective Lahey, Goth Girl is armed with a USB flash drive, determined to find some dirt about Dead Girl's murder on Sam's computer. When Goth arrives at the Law Office House, Michaela is already there, on an innocent-ish mission to return the justice statute that she just pilfered from "OITNB" Guy (OK, fine, he has a name; his character's name is "Asher," but that's my sister's cat's name, so we'll just stick with "OITNB" Guy.)

Boy, what a week for Lawyers (Allegedly) Behaving Badly. Today, police announced the Florida State University alum who shot three people at the FSU library early this morning was a lawyer too.

Myron May, 31, graduated from FSU and then received his J.D. from Texas Tech University School of Law. According to WESH-TV in Orlando, May entered the FSU library just after midnight, opening fire with a semiautomatic handgun, wounding three students.

Police killed May after he allegedly refused to drop his gun and began firing at them.

"Serial" is the hot new podcast that's taking the nation by storm. A spin-off of "This American Life," "Serial" is the story of Adnan Syed, a kid from a Baltimore suburb who was convicted of the murder of his ex-girlfriend in 1999. The show's creator, "TAL" producer Sarah Koenig, was clued into the story by Rabia Chaudry, a lawyer, journalist, and friend of Adnan's family.

The show unfolds in a serial format (hence the name), with a new episode each week focusing on a different aspect of the case. The podcast has already spawned a cottage industry of meta-podcasts and discussion groups. Much of the focus of the story is on the legal system.

Why should lawyers care about this show? (Minor spoilers follow. Just listen to the podcast, already.)

On Tuesday, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced 16 people would come together to form the Ferguson Commission, a panel appointed to help the community heal after the shooting death of Michael Brown.

According to The Associated Press, two attorneys will sit on the Ferguson commission, along with pastors, a community activist, a professor, and a detective, to name a few. And while some construction blogger is likely furiously typing about the owner of a Ferguson construction supply company's involvement, we're a bit more interested in the two lawyers.

So who are the lawyers on the Ferguson Commission?

On Friday, police in Southington, Connecticut, put an ad on a prostitution website soliciting clients. They got a lot of replies, including six suspects who were arrested at a local motel, apparently hoping they could get in on that prostitution they'd heard so much about.

And wouldn't you know it? One of them was a University of Connecticut adjunct law professor.

5 Tips for Your Legal Cover Letter

We've covered resumes before, but cover letters are a whole other ballgame. The cover letter -- which you should be sending even if a job description doesn't ask for it -- is your time to shine, to separate yourself from all the other lawyers blindly sending their resumes into the ether.

While there's no single correct way to craft a cover letter, there are some general principles you can follow for a smoother experience and with any luck, a better outcome (read: a job!).

#DearFindLaw - Advice for New Lawyers and Law Students from @FindLawLP

This week in #DearFindLaw, it's almost time for the first major break of the school year. For a blessed week at the end of November, there will be no classes -- but that doesn't mean there isn't work to be done. Whether you're a 1L freaking out about final exams (what's the Rule against Perpetuities again?) or a 2L struggling to finish the draft of your law review note (and praying the Supreme Court doesn't rule on your case until after you've published), you're a long way from free to do what you please.

In a Q&A here in the Bay Area, Justice Stephen Breyer once said that being a lawyer means having homework for the rest of your life. Does that mean you should go home for Thanksgiving? Here are a few pros and cons: