Greedy Associates

Greedy Associates - The FindLaw Legal Lifestyle and Career Blog


#DearFindLaw - Advice for New Lawyers and Law Students from @FindLawLP

#DearFindLaw: It's like Dear Abby, but for masochists masquerading as legal scholars.

What are this week's topics? The first is all about revising your legal writing (especially in law school) using checklists. Also, a wise man in a warm, humid place wants to know what a "3-2-1" study schedule is.

A few days ago, the topic of the day in the legal world was Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's comments about gay marriage and the Sixth Circuit: If they create a circuit split, it ups the urgency for the Supreme Court to take on the issue.

While others were debating the importance and propriety of her comments, I was debating something else: her glasses. Did anyone else notice the debut of Justice Ruth Bader Hipster, whose new thick, black glasses scream: "Straight Outta Brooklyn"?

We kid, of course -- her new, trendy choice of eyewear looks way better than her old set of frames. But it did inspire some musing about different styles of eyeglasses for lawyers, and what those spectacles say about the person wearing them:

Earlier today, we covered the best damn disciplinary opinion we've ever read, mostly due to the contributions of the defendant herself, Svitlana Sangary. (Quick recap: Sangary got busted for posting fake pictures of herself with celebrities on the "Publicity" page of her law firm's website.)

Sangary's philosophies on life, determination, and strength were so inspiring that we figured we'd share what we learned with all of you young attorneys out there, just starting out in the world.

Just remember: "Wikipedia [and FindLaw] describe it. SANGARY exemplifies it." Here are five takeaways:

When faced with an allegation that you ineffectively represented your client, do you (a) vehemently deny it or (b) begrudgingly accept it?

How about (c): Dress up as Thomas Jefferson and appear before the state Supreme Court to talk about how the First Amendment protects your terrible judgment?

That's the answer Ira Dennis Hawver chose. Hawver represented Phillip D. Cheatham Jr. in a capital murder case in 2005. Cheatham was convicted and sentenced to death, but the Kansas Supreme Court overturned the conviction in 2013, finding ineffective assistance of counsel.

Yesterday, Florida State University College of Law held a memorial service for the late Professor Dan Markel. In addition to teaching, Markel was a well-known legal blogger who founded the widely read PrawfsBlawg.

Markel, 41, was shot and killed in his garage in Tallahassee, Florida, on July 18. His murder remains unsolved.

With job prospects still fairly grim for recent law graduates, you might be asking yourself, "Should I move somewhere else?"

It's a decision fraught with questions if you don't have a job offer, and even more fraught with them if you do. Where should you move? And is it a good idea?

Here are five things you may want to consider:

In honor of Constitution Day, which is -- in my opinion -- the real birthday of the United States, we'll help all you 1Ls in your Constitutional Law studies by discussing five classic Con Law cases. Here we go:

1. Marbury v. Madison (1803).

Marbury started it all; and by "it," I mean "judicial review," which is nowhere to be found in the Constitution and otherwise appears only in The Federalist 78. The facts of the case are hopelessly irrelevant; all that matters is that, in Marbury, Chief Justice John Marshall declared, first of all, why the new country's Supreme Court exists in the first place: "It is emphatically the duty of the Judicial Department to say what the law is." He went on to articulate what is basically the foundation of constitutional law: When the Constitution conflicts with a lower law, the Constitution wins. Believe it or not, before Marbury, that was up in the air.

Welcome to Constitution Week at FindLaw! Why this week, of all weeks? Because during this week in 1787 (on September 17, to be exact), the U.S. Constitution was signed by attendees of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

Of course, the original draft had a few imperfections -- no Bill of Rights, the three-fifths compromise, and slavery, for example -- but the foundation was solid.

That being said, we're glad the Constitution has a built-in editing function. Here are our staff members' favorite fixes (amendments) to the U.S. Constitution:

#DearFindLaw - Advice for New Lawyers and Law Students from @FindLawLP

Welcome, folks, to another exciting edition of #DearFindLaw Fridays. Today's topic? Attack outlines.

We know. Contain yourself. We promise: This won't be too exciting.

And for those of you (lawyers, law students, pre-law folks) with questions about anything (law school, finances, student loans, tech choices for firms, Syria and ISIS), you can tweet us @FindLawLP and we'll try to give you a hand in our next weekly column.

Drinking. It sure is fun, isn't it? It's as much a part of the common law as misprision. Lawyers drink, and soon enough, there will be a happy hour consisting of you and your fellow awkward associates, plus a partner or two.

How do you survive such alcohol-fueled social interactions with other human beings after spending the last four months in Supermax (aka your law firm cubicle)? Here are some "dos and don'ts" to get you started: