"A Law School Carol" Sings the Law School Blues - Greedy Associates
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"A Law School Carol" Sings the Law School Blues

Mid-December is that special respite time in the life of a law student.  Finals draw to a close and suddenly there is an expanse of two weeks and change to help remember life outside the stare decisis of the law.

With the numerous holiday blockbusters making their red carpet unveils in December, the typical--or dare we say "reasonable"--law student might be doing everything in her might to stay away from mixing law and celluloid entertainment for the next few weeks.  And not to derail such efforts, we did come across a small screen animated series that might spark your interest.

And by "small screen" we mean laptop small.



In what may well be his directorial debut, a California law school graduate repurposes the malleable "Christmal Carol" featuring ghosts past, present, and future to express a feeling of 'buyer's remorse' for launching into a J.D. 

And while the animated online series, complete with computer-generated voices featuring questionable pronunciation, meticulously provides a counter-argument to many supposed arguments for attending law school it also seems to come back to the essential question, why do you want to go to law school?

The tale of the animated hero of the micro mini series centers around mismatched expectations of the costs and benefits of a legal career.  But if the answer to the question of 'why law school' is that you want the degree, you want to practice, to teach law or you otherwise are compelled to be in the field of law...you may emerge the series undeterred and unshaken.

If law school is where you wanted to be, for better or for worse, pursuing the degree might be the only way to quench that thirst.  For others, especially the many who 'wander' into law partly by chance, the virtual videos will likely speak a familiar dialect of legalese.  And for newbies thinking about applying to law school, the videos--and their underlying arguments-- are worth your consideration.

Bah, humbug.


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