What Women Should Not Wear (i.e. Miniskirt, Cleavage) to OCI Interviews - Greedy Associates
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What Women Should Not Wear (i.e. Miniskirt, Cleavage) to OCI Interviews

What should you wear to OCI (law school "on-campus interviews")?

For guys, it seems relatively simple. Slap on a conservative suit and a tie, a pair of nice shoes, and you're good to go.

For gals, it seems a little more complicated. Pant suit? Skirt suit? Flats? Pumps? Blouses? Knit shells?

A lot of what you end up wearing to your interviews is dependent on what you're comfortable with and what kind of firms you'll be meeting with.

But, there are some general fashion faux pas that all women should try to avoid:

The cleavage-baring top. In many social situations, wearing a cleavage-baring top may be an advantage. But, in a professional setting, it can come across as a little too bold. Dress a bit more conservatively, and save these bosom-flattering tops for after-work events.

The miniskirt. Exclaiming "but Ally McBeal wore miniskirts with her suit!" is not something you're going to land a job with. Television lawyers get away with sexier outfits. Real life lawyers do not.

The sandal. Many schools have OCI in the hot month of August. Your feet might be aching to slip into some nice, aerodynamic sandals, but do not wear them with your suit. OCI is not a day at the beach.

The oddly-colored suit. Bright pinks may have worked for Elle Woods, but alas, you are not her. Thinking about wearing that carnation-colored skirt suit? Think again. These types of suits may be acceptable where you live. In other places, it might make you stand out (and not in a good way).

The shirt that looks like lingerie. Lacy blouses seem to be on trend these days. But, there are some blouses and tanks that tend to look like intimate wear. Steer clear of these racy numbers, lest you accidentally send the wrong type of message to the interviewing partner.

So, what should you wear to OCI? It seems that when dressing for interviews, you need to use your common sense about what would be appropriate. And, if your common sense fails you, consult your school's career services office.

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