Greedy Associates - The FindLaw Legal Lifestyle and Career Blog

5 Signs of a Cheap Boss

If you are reading this article about signs of a cheap boss, you already know it doesn't end well.

It's like looking in the obituaries to see if someone died. It's the same thing that makes us slow down to look at car accidents. We just want to see what we know is already there.

So if you are reading this to confirm the sad truth of what you already know, enjoy a little spin. With apologies to Jeff Foxworthy, you might have a cheap boss if:

He Asks You Out to Lunch ...

... and hands you the check.

Seriously, if the boss says there literally is no free lunch, you might have a cheap boss.

She Emphasizes the Job Benefits ...

... but downplays the salary.

Benefits are great, but most of us work for money. Last time we checked, landlords don't accept PPO's or flex-hours in lieu of rent payments.

You Pay for Travel Expenses ...

... and the company doesn't reimburse you.

This is tricky because cheap companies may "reimburse" some expenses. "We'll reimburse you up to $100 for a room and $50 for meals." In other words, you'll be staying in Compton when you go to that conference in Beverly Hills.

Highly Value "Work-Life Balance"

In other words, the boss "doesn't highly value compensation."

Work-life balance is important, allowing employees to work fewer hours and to take time off for personal matters. But if your employer values work-life balance over pay, just make sure you can live with that monthly balance.

It Just Feels Wrong

If your employer wants you to do something that feels wrong, then you might have a cheap boss. That's because many things are intangible, until you actually do feel them, like sexually harassing pats on the backside.

The classic case is when the boss promises better pay after dinner -- even if he pays. Just ask Bill O'Reilly.

The bottom line is, penny-pinching is a major sign you work for a cheap boss. Frugality and fiscal discipline are real words to live by, but Scrooge is in the dictionary, too.

Related Resources: