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Pre-Law Students' Interest in Politics Jumps After Election

Since Donald Trump became president, some might think that the path to the White House is through reality television.

Or perhaps it is the billionaires club, except that didn't work out for billionaire candidate Ross Perot. So maybe it's just like the late George Carlin said: "Anyone can become president of the United States. And that's the problem."

In any case, more pre-law students see law school as the way to politics than in recent years. According to Kaplan Test Prep, more than half of 500 students surveyed say they would consider running for political office. At 53 percent, it represents a 15 percent jump in five years.

"Law school has long been a bullpen of aspiring politicians, and we think the recent election showed many pre-law students of all political persuasions how important it is to stay involved and stand up for what you believe," said Jeff Thomas, executive director of pre-law programs, Kaplan Test Prep.

Want to travel the world? See the lights of Paris one week, a bazaar in Indonesia the next? You can! Sort of. At least, metaphorically. In your legal work. With the right job, you can be handling issues that span the globe, from the frozen corners of Alaska to everywhere you can buy a Coke.

For this week's collection of cool legal jobs, presented as part of our affiliate relationship with Indeed, we're rounding up the best gigs with a decidedly international focus.

Who will win next weekend's Super Bowl showdown, the New England Patriots or the Atlanta Falcons? Who cares! (It's the Falcons.) What matters is that you win -- win in the career game, that is. And, if you're a lawyer with a passion for pig skin, you can.

In honor of Super Bowl LI, and as part of our affiliate relationship with Indeed, we're bringing you the three coolest, football-related legal jobs we could find this week.

If you feel like your career needs a jolt, maybe a switch to the energy sector is what you're looking for.

This week, as part of our affiliate relationship with Indeed, we're looking at openings in companies that handle everything from major dams to nuclear research. These gigs combine typical transactional law with a warren of government regulations and cutting-edge technology. They could be just what you need to give your work some spark.

Are you interested in the ways the law impacts non-human animals? Are you fascinated about the rights of primates, or the implications of biomedical science? Do you just want to hug every cat?

Well, then you might be interested in animal law -- and luckily, there are a few openings in this niche practice area. So, push your cat off your keyboard and load up your resume. This week, as part of our affiliate relationship with Indeed, we're bringing you the coolest three legal jobs we could find dealing with animals and the law.

We're probably a long ways away from colonizing Mars, but that doesn't mean there aren't plenty of people out there giving space exploration their best efforts. And unlike the Space Race, a lot of our extraterrestrial adventures now involve private actors.

Elon Musk, the Silicon Valley billionaire behind Tesla and SpaceX, wants to send humans to the Red Planet ASAP. Virgin Galactic is planning on flying you to space -- some day. Tickets should be just a few hundred thousand dollars. And last summer, a private company earned federal approval for travel to a celestial body. Moon Express became the first company to make it through the government's space regulatory scheme in August, earning the right to follow in Neil Armstrong's footsteps.

What do these businesses need? Not astronauts. Lawyers. And that means your dreams of a Space Law career might take off, someday soon.

Harvard Law Dean Steps Down to Teach

When Elena Kagan left Harvard to become a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Martha Minow had a tough act to follow as the new dean at Harvard Law School.

That was eight years ago, longer than Minow expected to serve as dean. Now, after weathering financial and enrollment problems that challenged many law schools, Minow is returning to her duties as a professor.

"Leading this institution for the last eight years has been an extraordinary honor and opportunity for daily learning (inspiring me to serve well beyond my initial intention of five years!)," she wrote to her friends and colleagues on Tuesday.

If you're a law school grad, but you can't find or don't want a job as a lawyer, there are plenty of alternatives: president, talk show host, Cuban revolutionary, or whiskey maker. Consider, too, the cybersecurity field. Cybersecurity, or "the cyber" as some have taken to calling it, is one of the fastest growing tech sectors, with the market predicted to be worth over $200 billion in a few years. The industry is adding millions of jobs and the unemployment rate for those with cybersecurity experience is zero, according to some reports. Zero. That's way better than the unemployment rate of law school grads.

And you don't have to be a computer sciences major to end up in cybersecurity. In a recent interview with Forbes, law school grad and former attorney Shelly Westman talked about her journey from law school to tech. Here's how she got from crim law to Senior VP of Alliances and Field Operations at the data security company Protegrity.

Congrats, law students. You've survived finals, most of the holidays, and still have a few days left before you have to drag yourself back to class. What should you do in the meantime? Work, of course! Sadly, your winter break isn't really much of a break. Instead, it's time to start scrambling for summer jobs.

So, if you're working on your JD, start updating your resume and polishing your cover letters. This week, as part of our affiliate relationship with Indeed, we're bringing you three of the coolest summer jobs for law students.

When Kirkland & Ellis sent a junior associate to a status conference, Eastern District of New York Judge Nicholas Garaufis had a bit of a fit. For the BigLaw firm to send an associate instead of a partner, for it to "think so little of this court," was "outrageous, irresponsible, and insulting," Garaufis said. Then he refused to continue the conference. "I've been a lawyer for 41 years and a judge for 16 years and I'm not having this discussion with you," he told the Kirkland associate, according to the New York Daily News.

But Garaufis may be the exception, not the rule. While young associates have been increasingly shut out of court in recent years, working more as glorified law clerks than litigators, some judges are making a point to demand fresher blood in the courtrooms.