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The Evergreen State just got a little greener, at least for lawyers. The Washington State Bar Association gave attorneys the, ahem, green light to use weed and operate marijuana-related businesses, just three years after Washington voters legalized recreational use.

This makes Washington the first state to not only allow attorney recreational use of weed but to also allow lawyers to go ahead and open their own pot shops, farms, or other businesses.

Top of your law school class? On the fast track to making partner? Don't expect us to be impressed. Real gunners become federal judges. Before they're 40.

Honestly, it shouldn't be that hard. At least according to the Ninth Circuit's resident conservative, porn aficionado, and cinephile, Judge Alex Kozinski. Kozinski, you may remember, was appointed to the Court of Federal Claims at the young age of 32. Follow his instructions and you could have the president calling you up for a spot on the federal courts, Kozinksi claims.

Two-thirds of parents want their kids to grow up to be lawyers. The other third have probably read the stats about lawyer depression, alcoholism, and student debt.

But forget lawyer kids, what about lawyer parents? There are plenty of perks that come from being an attorney, including pleasing your parents, but how does the legal profession stand up when it comes to actually being parents?

Welcome to "First Week at the Firm," a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Hello, new associate! There's a lot of unique, variable, and engaging work ahead of you -- some day. In the mean time, you'll be getting used to life as a new associate. Here are three things you'll soon be hearing over and over as you start your career as a lawyer.

Ah, to be a lawyer. The prestige, the wealth, the simple nobility of the legal profession! Sound good? Of course! If only real life matched the fantasy.

The fact is, a career in the legal profession isn't for everyone. The hours are grueling, the work draining, the job prospects shaky. But if you love it, you love it. Luckily, for those considering becoming a lawyer, there's plenty of opportunities to test out the legal profession before getting a J.D.

If only legal skill and acumen were all it took to build a firm! Instead, those looking to grow a practice soon realize that marketing and business development are essential to success — and sadly, these aren’t skills typically taught in law school.

Women lawyers, in particular, can face unique challenges in building a practice and making it rain. Thankfully, Thomson Reuters, FindLaw’s parent company, is here to help with “The Woman Lawyer’s Rainmaking Game: How to Build a Successful Law Practice.” Consider it a legal aid, just as essential as any practice guide on your shelf.

Abraham Lincoln got his start as a lawyer. Then again, so did Nixon. In fact, more than half of the U.S. Presidents have been lawyers. Working as an attorney is still one of the most common paths to political office, with 37 percent of the House and 57 percent of the Senate being made up of attorneys.

Politics is, after all, just another legal career. So, if you get tired of working with the laws, should you consider taking a job making them? Consider these pros and cons if you're ever thinking of making the jump from Greedy Associate to Greedy Politician.

A Juris Doctor is a terminal degree. Not because it kills you, though it might, but because it's the highest level of degree awarded in legal studies. So what do you do if a J.D. just isn't enough? You go down one -- to a Master of Laws, or LL.M. degree. An LL.M. is usually a one year course of study in a specialized area of law. You can get, for instance, an LL.M. in environmental law, tax law, or fashion law.

Generally, LL.M.s require a lot of extra debt while resulting in few career benefits. That's why people often refer to it as a "Lawyers Losing Money" degree. They're not worth it -- except when they are. Here are three times when it might make sense to go back and get an LL.M.

Welcome to First Week at the Firm, a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Sure, in law school you studied the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, probably criminal procedure, too. You might have even seen some state rules on ethics or jurisdiction. But nothing beats local rules.

Local rules are the court-specific rules governing your practice in a particular jurisdiction and you likely never really learned about them until you started practicing. These rules matter, though -- controlling everything from where to file your suit to how to move for summary judgment. Here's how to handle them:

Welcome to "First Week at the Firm," a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Your first week at the firm will probably find you worrying about your work load and stressed about performance as you start getting this whole lawyering thing down. But don't forget to make sure you have everything settled down HR-wise as well.

If your firm is large enough to have an HR department, swing by. HR can help set you up with direct deposit, employer contributions to your retirement plan, free gym memberships, and more. You've just got to know what to ask them. Here are five questions every new associate should ask their HR department: