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Forget Bird Law; Weed Law is one of the hottest legal fields right now. As more states turn slowly towards legalization -- 23 states and D.C. allow medical marijuana, while four have fully legalized it -- many lawyers are looking to specialize in this growing (no pun intended) market.

So, do you have a future representing Mary Jane?

So you're looking for a new job. We feel for you. Job searches are grueling, especially in an unforgiving economy. What's worse is how easy it is to do them wrong.

Of course, you know about the simple mistakes people make when looking for a job. Things like having a five page resume, addressing the cover letter to the wrong firm, or showing up late to an interview. You're smarter than that.

But those aren't the only mistakes to be made. In fact, these three are so common, you might not even know you're making them:

Now that you know what employers don't want to see on your resume, the question is: what do they want to see? (Advice framed in the negative is useful, but so is positive advice.)

When preparing your resume, make sure that your resume includes all of these elements. And remember: Your resume doesn't get you a job; it gets you an interview. You don't need to put your entire life story into your resume.

We've talked before about the importance of mentors. They give you advice, they give you experience, and hey, if you play your cards right, they just might point you toward a job opening.

The reality, though, is that once you're out of law school, your mentors will be practitioners, and they're very busy -- too busy, it would seem, to take a green lawyer under their wing. As it turns out, though, you can even get those busy lawyers to pay attention to you.

In the annals of what state bars can do to a lawyer, being disbarred ranks number one on the list. Lawyer TV shows frequently trot out disbarment as a punishment for things like lying to the court or breaking client confidentiality, leading civilians to think that it happens a lot.

Disbarment, though, is pretty rare, and reserved for only the most heinous offenses. Low-level offenders usually just get suspended, and if they did something particularly nasty, the state bar makes them re-take the bar exam.

So what does it really take to get disbarred?

A Virginia lawyer and politician accused of having sex with his law firm's then-17-year-old receptionist is out of jail, but his legal troubles aren't over yet.

Virginia Delegate Joseph D. Morrissey was released from jail last week -- just in time to be present as his former receptionist gave birth, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports.

Morrissey, a former high school teacher and Georgetown Law grad, served as the Commonwealth's Attorney for Richmond and was later elected to the Virginia House of Delegates. He was accused in 2013 of an having improper relationship with his law firm's teen receptionist. That woman gave birth over the weekend to a healthy baby boy, with Morrissey by her side.

Malpractice insurance. It's something most law firm attorneys don't have to think about. They're already covered under their employer's policy.

But contract attorneys don't always have the protection of an employer's malpractice insurance policy. As a contract attorney, do you need your own malpractice insurance?

Cue the lawyerly answer: Maybe.

Your resume is the first impression you make with employers. If it doesn't grab the employer's attention, you'll never get the chance to make your case to them in an interview.

CNN reports that, on average, human resource managers receive more than 75 resumes for each open position. How can you stand out from the crowd?

Consider these five techniques to elevate your resume:

A friend you knew in law school started his own law firm and is hiring. Congratulations, you have an advantage!

Many employers would prefer to hire someone they know over a stranger. Your lawyer friend knows how wonderfully smart and capable you are. He thinks you'd be a great addition to his law firm. But is it a wise idea to work for a friend?

Of course! But, keep these five tips in mind to maintain your friendship and sanity:

You're at the end of a law firm job interview and everything's going well. You smiled at all the right times, appeared interested, and shook hands like a pro. Just don't screw up these last few minutes and you might actually have a shot at this job.

Then the interviewer asks, "Do you have any questions for me?" Uh oh. Questions for you? What if you don't ask the right questions? Or any questions? Should you even ask questions?

To start, yes, it's a good idea to ask questions at the end of an interview. It looks like you're engaged and interested, plus you also get substantive questions answered. So instead of suddenly sweating from every part of your body, relax and take a look at these questions that you actually should be asking: