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Your resume is the first impression you make with employers. If it doesn't grab the employer's attention, you'll never get the chance to make your case to them in an interview.

CNN reports that, on average, human resource managers receive more than 75 resumes for each open position. How can you stand out from the crowd?

Consider these five techniques to elevate your resume:

A friend you knew in law school started his own law firm and is hiring. Congratulations, you have an advantage!

Many employers would prefer to hire someone they know over a stranger. Your lawyer friend knows how wonderfully smart and capable you are. He thinks you'd be a great addition to his law firm. But is it a wise idea to work for a friend?

Of course! But, keep these five tips in mind to maintain your friendship and sanity:

You're at the end of a law firm job interview and everything's going well. You smiled at all the right times, appeared interested, and shook hands like a pro. Just don't screw up these last few minutes and you might actually have a shot at this job.

Then the interviewer asks, "Do you have any questions for me?" Uh oh. Questions for you? What if you don't ask the right questions? Or any questions? Should you even ask questions?

To start, yes, it's a good idea to ask questions at the end of an interview. It looks like you're engaged and interested, plus you also get substantive questions answered. So instead of suddenly sweating from every part of your body, relax and take a look at these questions that you actually should be asking:

While we've taken our shots at the "practice-ready" curriculum and "JD advantage," if you're at a law school where those buzzwords percolate, chances are your job prospects aren't that awesome (otherwise, the career services office would be talking about actual practice jobs, not "sort of law-related" jobs).

You've made your bed. No use crying over spilt milk. And other cliches. Lots of lower-tier law schools are trying to make their students attractive by giving them other skills. So prepare yourself for some intensive training in ... accounting?

A new Harvard study, which claims lawyers are more liberal than the general population, has been making the rounds in the ABA Journal, The New York Times, and on Above the Law. The study aims to determine whether the judiciary is politicized, as has been claimed in the media for a long time now -- at least, depending on whether you agree with the judge's decision (which is problem one here).

The study also aims to determine what, if any, effect the politicization of lawyers has on monetary donations to judicial election campaigns. Most state court judges are elected, and the amount of money being spent in judicial campaigns is going up dramatically.

From the "here's what you can do when you don't want to be a lawyer anymore" files, have you tried becoming an Internet entrepreneur? Of course you have, but you aren't as inventive as Matthew Homann.

Among his many projects, Homann created a website where people can create fake profiles for significant others they don't have in order to convince their family and friends that they have a girlfriend or boyfriend.

The results from Vault's 2014 Law Firm Associate Survey are in, reports TaxProf Blog. Wait, why is TaxProf Blog reporting on this? Probably because "Tax" is the practice area with the highest associate satisfaction. Take that, antitrust!

So what makes tax law so interesting? "Tax law may be satisfying work because it is often described as solving a puzzle, allowing lawyers to find creative solutions to their clients' problems," Vault opines on its website. I read that to mean "finding ever-more creative ways around the tax code." But hey, everyone needs to find fulfillment at work.

So in which other practice areas are associates happy, according to this survey?

"They're terkin' 'er jerbs!" That's ostensibly the sound of lawyers, angry that non-lawyers are muscling in on our "profession." The latest target of our collective outrage is the Limited License Legal Technician, a type of legal job that as yet exists only in Washington state.

Once just an idea on paper, the first generation of LLLTs is ready to take its licensing exam in March. Should lawyers be afraid of LLLTs?

If you're a law student, a recent graduate, or even a new associate, here's a tip: Consider a career in criminal law with the District Attorney's office or the Public Defender.

"But," you say, "I couldn't care less about criminal law. I went to law school so I could become a civil litigator!" That might be true, but what will you do after you inevitably leave this job, downtrodden and depressed? A career of only a few years in criminal law could do you some good and give your resume some valuable litigation credibility.

Quit harshing my mellow! Now that recreational marijuana will soon be legal (under state law) in The Last Frontier, can attorneys advise clients on getting into the pot business? After all, it's still illegal under federal law.

Yeah, that's great. But the thing that lawyers really want to know is: Can I smoke, too?