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Abraham Lincoln got his start as a lawyer. Then again, so did Nixon. In fact, more than half of the U.S. Presidents have been lawyers. Working as an attorney is still one of the most common paths to political office, with 37 percent of the House and 57 percent of the Senate being made up of attorneys.

Politics is, after all, just another legal career. So, if you get tired of working with the laws, should you consider taking a job making them? Consider these pros and cons if you're ever thinking of making the jump from Greedy Associate to Greedy Politician.

A Juris Doctor is a terminal degree. Not because it kills you, though it might, but because it's the highest level of degree awarded in legal studies. So what do you do if a J.D. just isn't enough? You go down one -- to a Master of Laws, or LL.M. degree. An LL.M. is usually a one year course of study in a specialized area of law. You can get, for instance, an LL.M. in environmental law, tax law, or fashion law.

Generally, LL.M.s require a lot of extra debt while resulting in few career benefits. That's why people often refer to it as a "Lawyers Losing Money" degree. They're not worth it -- except when they are. Here are three times when it might make sense to go back and get an LL.M.

Welcome to First Week at the Firm, a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Sure, in law school you studied the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, probably criminal procedure, too. You might have even seen some state rules on ethics or jurisdiction. But nothing beats local rules.

Local rules are the court-specific rules governing your practice in a particular jurisdiction and you likely never really learned about them until you started practicing. These rules matter, though -- controlling everything from where to file your suit to how to move for summary judgment. Here's how to handle them:

Welcome to "First Week at the Firm," a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Your first week at the firm will probably find you worrying about your work load and stressed about performance as you start getting this whole lawyering thing down. But don't forget to make sure you have everything settled down HR-wise as well.

If your firm is large enough to have an HR department, swing by. HR can help set you up with direct deposit, employer contributions to your retirement plan, free gym memberships, and more. You've just got to know what to ask them. Here are five questions every new associate should ask their HR department:

If you're a law student or recent graduate, you're probably aware by now that finding legal work that pays can be difficult. For a law student looking to gain important legal experience, or young lawyers just starting out, it can be tempting to offer your services for free.

We're not talking pro bono representation of the indigent here, but unpaid internships, volunteer attorney positions, and no-cost legal services for otherwise paying customers. Should you ever do it?

Welcome to "First Week at the Firm," a FindLaw feature for beginning associates, focused on helping you navigate the transition into firm life. We hope you'll enjoy this new series and come back regularly for more insider tips.

Welcome to the firm! Mind doing my laundry, grabbing my kids from school, and bringing me a coffee? Yes, it is pretty unlikely you'll be greeted with these questions (if you are, congratulations on being one of the world's highest paid gophers). But sooner or later, you will probably get an inappropriate work request, something that just doesn't sit right.

An inappropriate work request might come your first week at the firm, or your second year, but odds are it will come, sooner or later. How should you respond?

Cesar Vargas came to the U.S. illegally at the age of five. His status as an undocumented immigration didn't stop him from pursuing a career in the law.

Undocumented aliens generally aren't able to obtain professional licenses in the U.S. The Appellate Division, Second Judicial Department reviewed Varaga's case. In the context of Obama's immigration reform policies, the state appeals court granted Varaga admittance to the New York Bar.

Working at a big firm this summer? Congrats! Summer associate positions aren't easy to come by. You've had to work hard to land the spot and you'll work hard throughout it. But, it's not like a summer associate position isn't without its perks.

Indeed, while you should treat the summer as a season-long interview, the firm will also be trying to sell itself to you. Good pay, good food, good work -- or at least lots of work -- are just some of the perks awaiting you.

It's not exactly the glamorous legal work shown on "The Good Wife" -- or even "Night Court" -- but document review makes up a fair share of many attorneys' work. In fact, document review is one of the great unifiers of the legal profession. Highly paid associates at BigLaw firms often slog through tedious document review just like their poorly paid contract attorney counterparts.

But is document review even the practice of law? Not according to one lawyer, who is arguing that his year plus of doc review for Skadden was so rote and mechanical it couldn't possibly be considered legal work -- and thus, he should be entitled to significant overtime pay.

The legal industry has seen plenty of technologically induced changes over the past decade, as e-discovery, online marketing and advances in legal research reshape the way lawyers work. As part of a symposium on the "legal profession's monopoly" last year, legal scholars argued that "machine intelligence" is on the verge of further revolutionizing the legal industry. The changes could be similar to the undoing of print journalism following the rise of Internet media.

Are such legal futurists just applying the typical clichés about "disruption" and the need to "adapt or die" applied to the legal industry? Absolutely. But there could be more to it than just that.