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If you want to make a good impression, dress better than everyone else. But just 25 percent better.

That's right, looking just a tad sharper and a bit more polished than everyone else around you could be the key to success, whether you're trying a case, interviewing for a job, or just looking to impress your peers.

The kids are out of school and you're still stuck working nights and weekends trying to make your billable hours. Sure, you'd much rather spend your days taking the little ones to the beach, instead of sitting through another status call or polishing off a memo, but that's not always possible.

So, lawyers with children, what exactly can you do to deal with the kids over the summer?

You've landed your dream legal job and you're ready to start your career as a superstar lawyer. But, unless you're starting off at the smallest of firms, you're not going to be entering the firm alone.

So how do you make yourself stand out from the rest of your associate cohort? To make an impression on the firm's partners? Here's how.

A bad boss can make an already difficult job unbearable. An annoying or aggressive coworker can turn every day at the firm into a crucible. But sadly, we're all going to run into terrible bosses and miserable coworkers at some point.

Thankfully, there's more you can do than just gritting your teeth and counting to ten. To help you out, here are our top tips on dealing with problem partners, insupportable support staff, and straight up jerks.

Business-Minded Attorneys Wanted by Startups

New startups are facing complex legal problems that need sharp, business-minded attorneys to help them work through the processes. Small companies trying to make it big are relying ever more on their attorneys to guide them. If you are an entrepreneur at heart, then that attorney could be you.

If You Have a Sadistic Boss, Should You Leave?

As if working in law wasn't tough enough already, now you're at the office facing the prospect of another day of subtle (or not so subtle) verbal abuse from your superiors. You figured that this was part of the tacit hazing-slash-training that came with the new-associate territory. But now you're beginning to wonder: "Is it worth it?"

A disgruntled ex-BigLaw associate took to Reddit yesterday to call out her old firm and explain why she left the law. Kristen Jarvis Johnson says she was a partner-track associate for nine years with Squire Patton Boggs. While at the firm, she experienced "blatant gender discrimination, sexual harassment, and a very clear glass ceiling," she wrote on Reddit.

So Johnson quit her job, walked away from her a nearly $400,000-a-year income, and now wants everyone to know just how awful her time in BigLaw was. Spoiler alert: it was pretty awful.

Law Clerk Murdered in Tragic Case of Mistaken Identity

Tragedy struck the city of St. Paul, Minnesota last week. Chase Passauer worked as a law clerk at the small criminal defense firm, North Star Criminal Defense, until he was shot dead last Thursday when a disgruntled client mistook him for his lawyer. The young clerk was considering eventually becoming a lawyer.

This is a reminder to all attorneys that they must practice vigilance, particularly when practicing law in emotionally-charged legal areas like criminal and family law.

Be a Better Lawyer by Handwriting Your Notes

If you're a millennial lawyer, you most likely spent your entire academic career taking notes in class using your computer. But according to research conducted by UCLA and Princeton, you weren't doing yourself any favors. Looks like new news is old news.

The research suggested that those students who took notes by longhand actually learned material better and retained the information longer than their laptop typing counterparts. It's no secret that writing effectively and learning quickly are essential tasks for lawyers. Can writing notes by hand make you a better lawyer?

The legal industry isn't winning any awards for diversity. After all, law is one of the whitest, malest professions in America. And the industry has been stubbornly slow to evolve. The number of women and minorities in the law has barely changed over the past 15 years, for example. That's probably why law firms have the worst reputation in the country for commitment to diversity, according to a recent survey.

But it's not all bad news! There are places in the law where diversity has persisted and even thrived. With that in mind, here are FindLaw's top seven posts on the legal industry's diversity successes.