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Congrats Morgan Lewis: you've now an even bigger BigLaw firm.

Last week, Morgan Lewis acqui-hired most of Bingham McCutchen, bringing on 525 lawyers and staffers, as well as 226 partners from the now-former firm. The move expands Morgan Lewis to around 2,000 lawyers in 28 offices, reports the ABA Journal. It means more or expanded practice areas for ML, and a few fleeing partners from the new conglomerate -- of the 307 listed partners at Bingham, 226 are making the move. The rest, presumably, are headed for other BigLaw firms. Thirty Bingham staffers are losing their jobs as well.

As for the associates, it looks like most, if not all, are making the cut. Here are a few thoughts for them, as well as anyone who doesn't make the cut:

The life of the BigLaw associate is centered around billable hours, and get about 2,000 of them in a year. Who hates them? Associates hate to keep track of them and meet them. Clients always think they're being cheated. And all of their spouses hate hearing about it.

Seems like only partners like billable hours. Jackson Lewis, however, decided to buck the system. Starting in 2015, reports Above the Law, 293 of its associates will longer be tied to them "as an evaluative tool."

You've seen the Christmas commercials and the Thanksgiving commercials, all filled with snow and jingling bells (which are wholly foreign to you if you're practicing in Los Angeles). The holiday season is upon us, and that probably means you'll soon be going on vacation.

If you're lucky enough to get some time off in your first year as an associate -- and even if you are technically "on vacation," you might be tethered to your phone -- there are some housekeeping chores you need to complete before locking your file cabinet and jetting off to parts unknown (or your parents' new house in Florida).

Here are a few "to-dos" you may want to add to your list:

In your law firm -- heck in your life -- you'll encounter people who are wrong. As in, factually wrong. Like, you can point to the fact in the book where what that person says contradicts what the book says.

Granted. But what if that "wrong" person is your boss? Or your colleague? Or -- gads -- a judge? There are different strategies for dealing with different kind of people (and here we're assuming, of course, that you've done your homework and you're certain that you're right and the other person isn't). Here are a few pointers to keep in mind:

Of all the places to get angry, work is probably the worst. ("In the middle of surgery" comes in a close second -- at least if you're the doctor.) Can you believe the partner just said you had to come in over the weekend? Or that he made you take on another case when you already said you couldn't? And look at this: Opposing counsel is categorically denying all your interrogatories. They can't all be vague, overbroad, compound, and burdensome!

It's times like these when you just want to scream, or hit something, or both. Stop for a second, though: There are better things you could be doing than preparing to get fired. Here are five suggestions:

Young associates work a lot. They're asked to do this, they're asked to do that -- and they feel like they need to say "yes" to everything in order to continue earning the boss' favor (that's the law firm partners, in this case).

But good relationship management involves establishing early on what each party expects from the other. This means learning the fine art of saying "no." By letting the partners know early on in the relationship that you'll push back if you have a really good reason, you let them know that you're not a pushover and, while you'll gladly take on additional work if you can, you'll be assertive about when you can't anymore.

So in honor of National Boss' Day (October 16), here's a bit of advice on the fine art of learning to say "no" to a partner or senior associate:

It's not enough to merely go to the office and do what you're supposed to. In a law firm, young associates have to do a little bit extra and impress their bosses -- senior associates and/or partners. After all, anyone can do what they're told, but if you want to really succeed at a law firm, you've got to go above and beyond the call of duty.

So how do you know if you're impressing the supervisors and higher-ups at your firm? Here are five questions to ask yourself:

It's time! Bar review is done. Bar exam is done. It's officially fall, and it's time to get to work.

For many of you, that means heading into the hallowed halls of BigLaw. Others will ply their trade for less pay, but arguably more noble causes. No matter where your shingle is hung, however, you are now joining the ranks of the working legal professionals.

Congratulations. Now don't screw it up. Here are five tips for new fall hires:

Ask any litigator: What's the most annoying part of the case? Discovery. And more specifically, depositions.

"Objection. Objection. Asked and answered. Objection. I need to speak with [coach] my client."

You get the point. It sucks. And we're not the only ones who have noticed. A federal judge, fed up with the "state of discovery in modern federal civil litigation," issued a sua sponte sanctions order against a BigLaw partner after reviewing the depositions in the case. Even better? The creative sanction wasn't cash. (H/T to Above the Law.)

It's going to happen sooner or later, if it hasn't already: you've been asked to write a brief with other people. In a big law firm, this could mean multiple layers of associates, senior associates, partners, managing partners, senior partners -- well, suffice it to say, there are a lot of people involved in the process.

Don't panic even if you are working with multiple people, each with different schedules, writing styles, writing habits, and different temperaments -- we're here to help. Here is your goal: Come out of writing the group brief with the same number of collegial co-workers you had going in, clothes unbloodied, and your sanity intact.

Now, here is how to reach that goal:

Going solo out of school? Spend more time developing practice skills and leave the marketing work for the experts.