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As lawyers, we can't advise our clients on the best way to break the law. We also aren't supposed to break the law ourselves. It's that ethics stuff that you slept through in law school.

In Washington (and Colorado), it is perfectly legal to toke up. Recreational use of marijuana, thanks to state initiatives, does not violate state law. It does, however, violate federal law to buy, sell, smoke, snort, chew, or to do pretty much anything with weed. So, when a Seattle lawyer wants to partake in a state-legal substance, or advise a client on the best way to structure her pot dispensary corporation, he may just be violating the Rules of Professional Conduct.

Drat.

With a few signatures from Governor Jerry Brown, California may have just become the most immigrant-friendly state in the country. On Saturday, Gov. Brown signed a package of bills reducing the state's cooperation with federal deportation programs, giving undocumented immigrants the right to obtain driver's licenses, and most important for our purposes, allowing undocumented immigrants to practice law, so long as the other requirements of bar admission are met.

While the legislation should have far-reaching effects across the state, it will be especially good news for one 36-year-old man, who has been waiting for a green card since the age of 17, and who passed the bar in 2009, yet is still waiting to practice law. Sergio Garcia's case ended up in the California Supreme Court last month, but with the new legislation, the case may be moot.

There may be no pragmatic reason for you to be sworn in to the Supreme Court. After all, how many of us will ever actually argue a case in those hallowed chambers? Still, for most of us, the Supreme Court represents the epitome of our legal system.

It may be the Yankee Stadium or Fenway Park of American law, home of some of the greatest legal minds in history, the playing field for countless others, but gaining admission is simply a matter of applying, after meeting a few prerequisites.

In honor of Supreme Court Week here at FindLaw, here are the rules of the game:

At FindLaw, we're a little tired of the negative "lawyers are sharks" jokes, so we're reclaiming the word. As Run-DMC would say, it's "Not bad meaning bad, but bad meaning good."

When people are making all those jokes, they seem to forget that lawyers are also the people defending their civil liberties. So, in honor of the Discovery Channel's Shark Week, we thought it would be fun to highlight some of the most bad-ass lawyer sharks throughout history.

How Do Random Acts of Ignorance Affect the Gay Rights Debate?

In case you missed it, vandals redecorated the Lambda Law Students Association's office at Boston College Law School (BCLS) over the weekend with a wall full of hate. Above the Law has a photo of the hooligans' handiwork here.

BCLS Dean Vincent D. Rougeau condemned the act. Jason Triplett, co-chair of the school's Lambda Law chapter, told Above the Law that the graffiti was shocking because the both students and faculty at the school are inclusive and supportive of the organization. Another Lambda Legal member suggested that the perpetrator was unaffiliated with the law school.

We have a problem. The editors insist on uniform standards of writing. Though such a quest is laudable, it creates a significant issue for us writers when it comes to two weird words: pleaded and drunken.

It's not just us either. The ABA and the Daily Report are pleading for a resolution to the pleaded versus pled debate. Meanwhile, we've turned to bottles of two buck chuck after arguing for common usage over technicalities in the drunken drunk debate.

Justice Elena Kagan Goes Antelope Hunting with Scalia

Justice Elena Kagan had a lot to say in a presentation at the University of Tennessee on Friday, but the part everyone paid attention to was when she mentioned going hunting with Scalia.

During the talk on her life both in and out of the courtroom, Kagan mentioned that she has gone hunting with fellow Justice Antonin Scalia. She also admitted to plans to go hunting in Wyoming for big game with the hopes of bagging an antelope, much to the chagrin of some liberals.

Besides establishing herself as a hunting enthusiast, Kagan also had some interesting things to say about being a woman on the court and a few tidbits to share about herself.

Introducing our Ex-Lawyer of the Week: Nelson Mandela.

Mandela, South Africa's first black president, turns 94 today. Many are celebrating by completing "67 minutes of good deeds," one for each year of Mandela's anti-apartheid struggles, Reuters reports.

But Mandela's push for social justice actually began with a groundbreaking law practice he founded with a friend. The firm of Mandela & Tambo marks its 60th anniversary this year, and stands as a monument to Mandela's lifelong commitment to equality.

Justice Stephen Breyer's Caribbean vacation took a scary turn last week. Breyer was robbed by a man armed with a machete, who took about $1,000 in cash, Reuters reports.

No one was hurt in the Feb. 9 robbery at Breyer's vacation home on the island of Nevis, and the robber is still on the loose, according to Reuters. An FBI agent arrived in Nevis on Friday, but his role in the investigation was not immediately clear, The St. Kitts-Nevis Observer reports.

While U.S. laws don't apply in Nevis, Nevisian law does -- and Justice Stephen Breyer's robber could get a lashing in court. Literally.

With January's arguments completed, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has embarked on a legal "listening" tour of Egypt and Tunisia, one year after the "Arab Spring" uprisings began.

The Supreme Court's elder jurist landed in Egypt on Friday, the start of a politically significant weekend there. Justice Ginsburg, 78, is traveling with her daughter, Columbia law professor Jane Ginsburg, according to the State Department.

Justice Ginsburg's visit to Egypt will be followed by a stop in Tunisia where the Arab Spring uprisings began, the State Department reports. Perhaps due to security concerns, just a few scant details about the associate justice's trip have been released: