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One of the world's greatest athletes passed away last weekend. Muhammad Ali, the three time world boxing champ, died on Saturday at the age of 74. Ali was more than just a thrilling boxer, he was an icon, a justifiably self-confident braggart, a war resister, and a civil rights advocate. And for a celebrity athlete, he had a closer connection to the law than many. His death came just shy of the 45th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision overturning his conviction for draft evasion.

Here's what lawyers can learn from his life and passing.

America is obsessed with where transgender people poop. In March, North Carolina made it a crime for anyone to use a bathroom that doesn't correspond to their sex at birth -- ostensibly to fight off the non-existent plague of predatory men in dresses lurking behind the commode. That set off a showdown with the Department of Justice over what rights are afforded transgender people, who simply want to pee in peace. Just yesterday, the Fourth Circuit urged a quick appeal to the Supreme Court in a case over transgender bathroom access.

But as the fight over trans rights enters courtrooms across the nation, only one judge can speak from her own personal experience. Phyllis Randolph Frye is an associate judge in Houston's municipal courts and the first openly transgender judge in the country. She recently sat down with the ABA Journal to discuss the latest front in transgender rights: the bathroom.

The American Bar Association is currently considering amending the Model Rules on attorney misconduct to make "discrimination and harassment" a professionally punishable offense. That's great, right? After all, pretty much no one is for discrimination and harassment.

Except the wording of the proposed amendment has many attorneys up in arms -- particularly over the inclusion of on "socioeconomic status." Here's why.

What brought down the biggest and greatest rock band of all time? It wasn't Yoko Ono, despite what you might have heard. It may have been litigation however, as the Beatles were dogged by a series of lawsuits and legal missteps virtually from the band's founding.

That's Stan Soocher's take on it, at least. Soocher, an entertainment attorney, recently published "Baby You're a Rich Man: Suing the Beatles for Fun and Profit," which was excerpted in the May issue of the ABA Journal. The Beatles' early legal troubles meant that the band "found themselves on the losing side of battles over nearly every aspect of their business," Soocher writes. And those ill-fated battles stretched on long after the band had split.

When Justice Scalia passed away last Saturday, politicians and pundits immediately set about remembering the conservative jurist and his legacy. But one voice stands out among the rest: that of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose relationship with Antonin Scalia proved that friendship knew no boundaries.

Their camaraderie spanned boroughs (he's from Queens, she's from Brooklyn), backgrounds (he attended Harvard, she's the only Columbia grad on the High Court), and, of course, politics. It even inspired an opera. Here's how Justice Ginsburg remembered her longtime friend and "best buddy."

World Record Academy Names World's Oldest Law Firm

The world's oldest law firm is one you've never heard of: Thomson Snell & Passmore. The England-based law firm has offices in the towns of Dartford and Tunbridge Wells near London.

Part of the reason you might not have ever heard of the firm is because the firm has changed its name a number of times throughout its long and storied life. Well, you would expect something like that from a law firm has been around since Shakespeare was writing his sonnets.

It's been over 300 years since the Salem Witch Trials. Today, children parade down the street in witch costumes, Hollywood's leading actresses line up to play sorceresses, and Seattle-area high schools consider opening football games with satanic invocations.

A witch even sued a warlock in Salem District Court -- and won! Whatever happened to good, old-fashioned witch burnings?

ACLU Sues CIA Torture Program Architects

Approximately one week ago, the ACLU filed a complaint against the engineers of the CIA's notorious torture program on behalf of three men who claimed they were victimized by the CIA's brutal interrogation techniques.

It is believed to be the first legal suit that is directly related to the 2014 release of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Report regarding CIA torture of suspected terrorists.

An underage sex scandal quickly became a billion dollar extortion attempt involving a former federal judge, a retail magnate, and Alan Dershowitz -- at least according to Dershowitz himself. The famous lawyer testified under oath last Thursday that Paul Cassell, a former federal judge and current Utah law professor, and Brad Edwards, a Florida lawyer, tried to use him as part of a "criminal conspiracy" to extort one billion dollars.

You might remember the Dershowitz from his defense of Mike Tyson, Patty Hearst, and O.J. Simpson -- or maybe from his almost 50 years teaching at Harvard Law. The current controversy stems from another controversial Dershowitz representation, this time of Palm Beach billionaire Jeffrey Epstein, who was accused of organizing an underage sex ring.

Kansas may be without a state court system soon, if the governor and legislature get their way. The courts face a total loss of funding after a judge struck down a change to the way chief judges were selected. In an attempt to prevent that ruling, the state legislature passed budget legislation in June that would make the court's budget "null and void" should the law be invalidated.

Besides just selecting new chief judges, Kansas court's system is also responsible for simple things like conducting criminal trials, granting divorces, and probating wills -- services that might be harder to provide should all funding disappear.