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PayPal, the online payment company owned by Ebay, has agreed to pay $25 million to settle claims stemming from its "Bill Me Later" program. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau had accused PayPal of refusing to honor the advertised terms of its online credit product, signing customers up for credit without their permission, and failing to properly manage its credit and billing system.

Thankfully, PayPal's failure can be your inspiration, as there's plenty to learn from the company's credit debacle.

A recent survey of directors, board chairs and CEOs sheds new light on the role of general counsel in large corporations. The survey, conducted by the legal recruiting company Barker Gilmore and NYSE Governance Services, reached over 5,000 corporate leaders, though the response rate was not given.

It's filled with valuable insights into the minds of executive teams, who are increasingly looking at general counsel as a valuable part of corporate leadership. Here's some of the lessons in-house counsel can take away:

The nation's largest retailer, of both discount goods and guns, doesn't have to include a proposal from shareholders in its proxy materials, the Third Circuit ruled on Tuesday. A lower court had ruled that Walmart violated securities law when it refused to include a proposal by a shareholder and one of the nation's oldest churches, Trinity Wall Street.

The case is a reminder of the fine line between shareholder proposals which seek to change a business's social policy, which are permissible, and those which seek to change its day-to-day operations, which a company may ignore.

Amazon and Yelp are both currently suing companies that sell fake online reviews, a major reminder that online reputation can have a major impact on the success or failure of a business. Reading just three negative reviews can be enough to change the mind of most consumers, according to The Guardian, so sham online ratings may result in serious damages.

So, what should you do if your company is bombarded with false, negative reviews? Here are three tips:

JPMorgan Chase is instituting new software that will identify "rogue employees" before they actually do wrong, the banking and financial services company announced. We'll skip the comparison to "Minority Report," the early aughts film in which Tom Cruise hunts down "precriminals" before they can act.

Chase has been rattled by compliance over the past years, having recently settled a Department of Justice investigation into its mortgage practices for $13 billion. It has faced continuing investigation on multiple fronts, from accusations that it manipulated energy markets, to claims it improperly steered clients into self-serving investments.

Could a corporate Big Brother be the answer to Chase's woes? If it is, will others follow?

Things aren't looking good for Wynn resorts and casinos these days. Institutional Shareholder Services, a proxy advisory firm, issued an unusually strong condemnation of Wynn and its management, saying that it had created a corporate governance record that is "among the worst" in the U.S. It urged shareholders to withhold votes for every nominee to the board.

Elaine Wynn, one of the resort's co-founders, has been campaigning to rejoin the board. The board had voted to allow her seat to expire this April, reducing its size from eight to seven, and had supported two incumbent directors, but not her, for re-election.

As a co-founder of the company and director for 13 years, the proxy firm held her responsible for many of the failings at the resort company. Here are three lessons to be learned from their report:

As Indiana and Arkansas were considering "religious freedom" bills that, opponents argued, would give companies the right to discriminate, several high profile corporations took public stances against them.

Apple, Salesforce, American Airlines and even Walmart spoke out against the legislation. Yeah, Walmart, the second largest corporation in America, often reviled by progressives, contacted the Governor of Arkansas and urged him to veto his state's RFRA legislation.

Why?

Charles Malik, a Lebanese philosopher and diplomat, once said, "The fastest way to change society is to mobilize the women of the world."

This year, in honor of International Women's Day (March 8), we've rounded up our Top 5 In House blog posts about women mobilizing to create change in the corporate legal department:

While Walmart's in-house counsel may know all the rules regarding age and disability discrimination, some of Walmart's in-store employees clearly do not. The EEOC filed suit against Walmart on behalf of David Moorman, a former manager at a Walmart store in Keller, Texas, alleging age and disability discrimination in violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Moorman claimed he was taunted and ridiculed by direct supervisors who called him "old man" and "old food guy." He was also allegedly denied reasonable accommodations for his diabetes (he requested a change in work duties) and was subsequently fired.

Walmart has agreed to settle the case, and to pay Moorman $150,000. Walmart also must train its employees on what conduct constitutes unlawful discrimination or harassment under the ADA and the ADEA.

Several years ago, the Justice Department announced it was cracking down on violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the federal statute that makes it a crime to bribe foreign government officials in order to get business.

Last week, the French engineering company Alstom interrupted its Merry Christmas to plead guilty to FCPA violations and pay $772 million in fines -- the largest ever for foreign bribery, according to The New York Times.