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Your company is hiring. It's inundated by resumes, applications, letters of recommendation. Once you've found the perfect match for the job, you can click delete and let the rest of the applications go, right? No way. Keep those suckers around -- for years.

Federal record keeping requirements are strict. Failure to hold onto applications can open you up to litigation, from applicants and from the EEOC, as Coca-Cola learned the hard way a few weeks ago.

Here's a simple tip for corporate communications: don't start emails to your team with "Wuddup my n*****." In fact, don't use the "N word" at all. Ever. Especially not when you're working high up in a diversity-starved, struggling tech company.

It's not a hard lesson, but it's one that Yahoo's Jerry Shen failed to learn. Shen worked as a director of engineering and joined Yahoo after his fantasy football app was bought up by the purple, exclamatory tech company. He recently sent an N.W.A.-themed email throughout the company. It started with "Wuddup" and didn't get much better from there. Shen was fired the same day.

The ranks of America's independent contractors, freelancers, and temporary workers have swelled over the past years. Many companies have eagerly switched to a contract-based workforce. After all, using independent contractors allows corporations to avoid many of the costs and risks of employment -- by shifting them onto the worker.

But, if today is the golden age of contract work, two recent developments signal that the era could be coming to an end -- or at least facing major new obstacles. The first, a decision by the National Labor Relations Board removes a significant protection provided employers using contract work. The second, the granting of class action status to thousands of Uber drivers, risks exposing corporations to significant, costly litigation for potentially misclassifying workers.

Long hours are coming under fire. First, there's the Department of Labor's plan to expand overtime pay to millions of white-collar workers. Then there's that New York Times Amazon piece. You know the one -- the one that emphasizes the online retailer's grueling hours and demanding culture. The one that makes Amazon look like a corporate Guantanamo, but with less downtime.

Excessive work demands took an extra blow the other day when a Pennsylvania court ruled that the widow of a worker who died during a 14 hour shift was entitled to death benefits. The employer was liable for working the man to death, the court ruled.

Forget Alphabet or Moore's Law or artificial intelligence: when it comes to big news in tech, families are taking center stage. Less than a week ago, Netflix announced a new, generous parental leave policy, giving new parents as much paid time off as they need. Then Microsoft followed suit, announcing that employees could take five months of leave. Yesterday, Adobe caught up, offering over six months of paid leave.

Apparently, parental leave has become the new hot commodity when it comes to recruiting and retaining top talent and proving one's commitment to employees and family. Should your company follow suit?

Litigators usually aren't natural investigators, but in-house counsel can often be called on to play that role. Whether it's responding to an allegation of harassment, accusations of discrimination, or internal whistle blowing, in-house counsel will sometimes have to play the role of Sherlock Holmes, rather than ... whoever played Sherlock's lawyer.

That means taking a different approach to investigating complaints, often beginning with a simple investigatory interview. Here are seven tips to help guide your way through the investigation process.

It's no secret that the legal profession has been slow to cultivate and support a diverse workforce. Law is one of the whitest, most male-dominated professions, losing to the medical, engineering, and even tech industries when it comes to diversity.

Yet, many in-house legal departments are faced with corporate diversity initiatives which seek to strengthen diversity within the company and its partners. Here's how CGs can help accomplish those goals, helping to lead the way to a more diverse legal profession despite barriers in the industry.

You knew it was coming and now it's here. The Obama administration announced the long anticipated expansion of overtime requirements last month. Under the proposed new rules, millions of white collar workers, previously exempt, will now qualify for overtime pay when they work more than 40 hours a week.

The new white collar overtime rules are expected to come into effect in 2016. In-house legal departments should start preparing for the change now.

No company likes to lose valuable employees -- given how much it costs to hire, train, and develop employees, pretty much all of them are valuable. What's worse is when a skilled employee leaves to work for the competition. As Chris Brown so eloquently put it, highly skilled professionals ain't loyal.

What's a GC to do? Slip in non-compete clauses and other post-employment restrictions into all employment agreements, of course. However, given recent updates in the law, it might be time to update your standard boilerplate -- or consider revising them all together. Here's what to keep in mind:

Get ready for expanded overtime. In the upcoming month, the Department of Labor is expected to release new Fair Labor Standards Act rules which are expected to greatly expand the number of employees eligible for overtime. The FLSA requires that employees who work more than 40 hours a week be paid time and a half for any overtime.

For decades, that overtime requirement has been applicable only for lower-paid employees. Under the new rules, the salary cap will go up, allowing millions of salaried workers to qualify for overtime for the first time. GCs should be ready for the change.